YEOUCH!!

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by ozzy, Oct 1, 2008.

  1. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    Now I know what a bowstring across the forearm feels like. I shot about a dozen arrows today, first time Ive fired off this bow. Did pretty good. first 2 shots at 20 yards was about 2 feet low, i messed with the sight some and got to within a foot below the bullseye. Dead center just low. Kept hitting low so I left and picked up a bow square on the way home. The bottom brush on the hostage rest was pushing up on the arrow so I played around with it. Now gotta go back out and see how it shoots. Ill get there.
     
  2. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Ozzy. Here's a tip for you. Keep the bow arm slightly bent while shooting. If this feels to uncomfortable, then the draw length may be to long. Good luck with the rest. You should be able to get it zeroed in. Good shooting and have a great time. I also wanted to add, make sure you have good follow through on the shot. Don't let the bow drop after the shot. Than can cause low hits. If you're right handed, the bow bow should swing to the left after the shot sequence.
     

  3. BIG_D

    BIG_D New Member

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    8,107
    State:
    Batchtown IL.
    lol dosent that feel good that wont happen to many times till you learn to hold that bow square lol it will make you take note of what not to do real fast
     
  4. rrssmith

    rrssmith New Member

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    3,059
    State:
    Bakersfield
    I knew what you were talking about by just reading your headline!!!!!!doesnt feel to good does it
     
  5. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    All these guys are right on target. The only advice I didn't read here is this; don't hold the bow too tight. That can cause "string rash" also. If you hold it lose and let it float in you hand, you tend to get a more consistent release. I just wrap my index finger around so it just touches the tip of my thumb. The other fingers don't even come into play. Keep trying. In no time at all you'll find what works for you. Another good trick is to have a buddy or a video camera standing off the side, (string hand side) watching your release. Sometimes you can't tell if you are dropping your hand, twisting your wrist, not coming to anchor point, second guessing your release, etc. Someone on the side can identify some of these problems, and soon it will become second nature.
     
  6. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

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    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    I know the pain! Your draw length is way to long! Take it to a pro shop and see if they can shorten the draw length for you.
     
  7. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

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    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    That's good advice Willie! I shoot with my hand wide open and the bow resting on the web between my index finger and thumb and a wrist sling attached to the bow. That way when I release the arrow I'm not gripping the bow to keep it from falling out of my hand and to the ground. The less you touch the bow during the shot the less chance of torquing.
     
  8. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    Being the first time Ive shot a bow, I think I just leaned into my arm. Was watching the level, the pin, trying to keep it in the corner of my mouth, looking at the target, concentrate on my breathing, etc. I had 2 different people measure me and both told me 28" draw length. I did find a small hole in the wall pro shop, if I keep doing it Ill go to them and get it resetup. Thanks.
     
  9. Mike81

    Mike81 Well-Known Member

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    4,186
    State:
    Alabama
    Dat smarts don't it???? lol :big_smile::tounge_out:
     
  10. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    I read about that and I think I was holding a little to tight. I figured I better stop, go home and evaluate what I was doing. I hit it again in a couple days.
     
  11. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    I wont be doing that again! I think my release is to long, past my finger tip. Gonna short it up a bit.
     
  12. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Here's a tip Ozzy. I don't really recommend doing this for beginners, but it does help with the proper grip. Rubbing lotion or something slick on the grip hand. This helps the hand and grip, slip into the proper position. The pressure point should be in the area of the LIFE LINE on the palm of your hand. This area is located on the meaty part of the lower thumb. Keep the hand at a 45 deg angle for the proper grip. This will help from torqueing the bow. Keep practicing and having someone experienced watching you will help tremendously. Experienced archers go through approx. 30 different phases of the shot sequence, but for now just work on the basic fundementals and it will come to you!!:big_smile:
     
  13. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    Thanks, I was the only one out there today. Just wanted to get a few out there just to see how it feels. I tell ya Im hooked. I wish I started years ago.
     
  14. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    No time like the present to learn OZZY!! Wish I would of started years ago to. I've been doing it for aprrox. 13-14 years now, but I wish I would of learned at an earlier age.

    Actually starting with a traditional bow and learning to shoot fingers is very beneficial for a beginner. Don't get me wrong, I started with the compound and release too. I'm doing just fine and you will too!!:big_smile: Todays bows are made so accurate that a beginner can take a well set up bow and shoot lights out in a matter of a few shots. Considering his or her form and shot sequence are done right.
     
  15. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

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    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    I remember the first time I got a string burn. I went right out and bought an arm guard for target shooting untill I found the sweet spot for my arm.

    Keep on flinging those arrows and watch your groups shrink before your eyes. Some day soon you will hear an odd noise and you'll say to yourself 'what the heck was that?' It will be the sound of your very first robin hood. It's a pretty cool sound and feeling but gets expensive after a while!

    Your hooked dude! I too wish I had started sooner.

    This dog is ready to hunt!!!!!
     
  16. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    The guy who set my bow up at BPS didnt seem to happy and kind of did it quick. I figure Ill just learn from the best here at BOC and do it myself. Self taught my whole life, why change now. :big_smile:
     
  17. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    I almost bought an arm guard on the way home and thought, nope Ill learn the hard way. Ya Im hooked. :big_smile:
     
  18. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    I tell ya I was very surprised how quiet this bow is. Its short axle centers 30 5/8. Its a BPS model but made by Diamond. Heck Im going again tomorrow, only six shots tho and evaluate again.
     
  19. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Arm guards are best for keeping your lose camo from getting in the way of a shot. The only time I use one is when I'm hunting. I believe in being self taught. When I started, I listened to everyone that had any advice. I read everything I could find on bow hunting. I tried different rests, different sights, no sights, different anchor points. I tried it all, but eventually I found what worked for me, and stuck with it. Being primarily a bow hunter, and not a target shooter, I found it best to shoot instinctively and eliminate all the gimmicks that break down, wear out, and require maintenance. A baseball pitcher can put a ball anywhere he wants at 90 feet, 30 yards, with no sights. If hunting is your game, I'm sure you can do the same thing with an arrow, you only have to be able to hit a chest cavity the size of a dinner plate) with no sights, just a little practice. People have been doing it for centuries. Byron Ferguson hits aspirin out of the air without and sights, rests, or any other gimmicks. Check this out!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxS8W7lWMU
     
  20. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    Now that man is good. :crazy: