Worm Beds

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by BIG_D, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. BIG_D

    BIG_D New Member

    Messages:
    8,107
    State:
    Batchtown IL.
    thinking about tilling up a little spot in the back yard and making a worm bed what do you guys do to keep worms coming and staying in your worm beds when i was a young man my grand father had a worm bed all i remember him doing was keeping it coverd with leaves and keeping it wet
     
  2. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    my friend puts coffee grounds in his dirt.if he don't have that he puts corn meal.and you can throw old bread in there too.not much help but thats all i know,unless you wanna buy some rabbits.
     

  3. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    There are some pretty good articles in the library about building worm beds. If nothing else, it might give you some ideas for what you're trying. I've read about newspaper, potato peels, coffee grounds, oatmeal and things like that.
     
  4. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    Dallas good luck on your new project. I agree with all of the above post.
     
  5. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    if you put starter worms in don't use candian night crawlers.all i've read on worm beds said they will crawl away.certain kinds will stay.
     
  6. whiteriver

    whiteriver New Member

    Messages:
    617
    State:
    in
    Try this Dallas, I hope this is what your interested in.

    Getting started is easy. Everything you need can be found in your local home-improvement store. You can estimate spending about $70 on the supplies needed to build your worm bed.
    YOU’LL NEED:

    • 2 25-lb. bags of cement mix
    • 6 7-inch by 1⁄4-inch by 6-foot boards
    • 6 7-inch by 1⁄4-inch by 3-foot boards
    • 6 2-inch by 1⁄4-inch by 2-foot boards
    • a 3-by-6-foot screen mesh
    The boards can be bought new or you can use old boards you have lying around. The boards may be different sizes as long as they are equal to the size of the bed.​
    STEP 1: Pick a spot that is shady most of the day.
    STEP 2: Measure an area 6 feet long by 3 feet wide.
    STEP 3: Dig a hole the size of that area to 36 inches deep. Keep some of the dirt for use later.
    STEP 4: With your boards, make a box frame to fit inside the bed you’ve dug. The box will be set into the ground about a foot below the surface.
    STEP 5: Place the frame inside the bed. There should be a 1/4-inch gap around the outside of the frame.
    STEP 6: Mix the cement according to the directions on the bag.
    STEP 7: Pour the concrete into the 1/4-inch gap around the box. Don’t overfill into the bed.
    STEP 8: Let the concrete harden. Remove the frame one wall at a time.
    STEP 9: Fill the bed with a mixture of peat moss, shredded newspaper and part of the dirt you removed.
    STEP 10: Make the top from two of the 6-foot long boards and two of the 3-foot boards. Nail the screen mesh to the boards to make a rectangular door-like frame.
    STEP 11: Place the top on the worm bed. This will keep animals out of the bed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  7. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    Whiteriver has an excellent idea. I may try that project this winter. And I want to add it's probably best to use rough, untreated lumber. Treated lumber might just have some chemical not good for the worms.

    Which type of nightcrawler would be best to raise? I too have heard that Canadian 'crawlers are not the best. Maybe European crawlers?

    Whiteriver, how many nightcrawlers do you advise putting in there for starters?
     
  8. whiteriver

    whiteriver New Member

    Messages:
    617
    State:
    in
    I don't have any experience with night crawlers, all I have ever raised is red worms. RW usually double every 60 days or so depending on the temp. You are right about not using treated lumber.
     
  9. richard dunbar

    richard dunbar New Member

    Messages:
    550
    State:
    Washington
    Leaves and wet is good. Add some old coffee grounds or lettuce or some other used food every month or so. You also have to keep it soft so every week or so go out and turn over with a regular shovel. In about two weeks your numbers should double. Eventually depending on the size of the bed you should have thousands of worms in there and as long as you manage it every time you go out the baits there. :wink:
     
  10. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc

    Dallas, search on " vermicomposting ", It's something you may wanna look into or at least get other options from. I know you have some nice plants at the house and this may be of use to you.