Wondering about my drag

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by cathouse, Oct 26, 2006.

  1. cathouse

    cathouse New Member

    Messages:
    313
    State:
    NY
    I was wondering if the drag on my reel is working properly , it is a penn 209 reel. How many pounds should the drag release at or should it lock down completely.I have it spooled with 65 LB. power pro on a medium heavy tiger ugly stick if that makes a differance.
     
  2. CatBusster

    CatBusster New Member

    Messages:
    295
    State:
    Out Fishing
    Star drags need a bit more attention than a lever drag, either the star drag is too tight or too loose.

    You can adjust the star as per fight, if the fish is taking line, tighten the star, if it is ripping the rod out of your habnd then loosen
     

  3. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    Chris, the best way to go about it is like catbusster said. I like to leave my drag loose, sorta like you are fishing for a 5lb bass. I use my thumb on the spool to put pressure on when I'm pulling him up, then release, wind in some line, and let him pull drag if he is big enough. You can lose more flats than you'll catch if you keep your drag too tight. Most of the ones I catch are hooked around the mouth, too tight a drag will cause the hook to pop through if he's hooked in the soft flesh at the corners. Just use steady pressure, always keep the line tight (no slack). Don't use any more pressure than you need to keep him under controll. I use 80lb power-pro so I'm not worried about him breaking my line, breaking my pole maybe, but you have more control with your thumb, and can always tighten the drag some in the middle of the fight. Also when you get him close to the boat make sure to loosen the drag back up so he won't break off or pull off when you hit him with that light as you try to land him. Cause they will almost always give you one more powerful surge trying to dive to the bottom at boatside.
     
  4. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    i dont think it should lock down completly but it should be verry hard to pull out by hand & glove. Ive asked the same question and only got one answer from peewee shimono's charter should be around 33lbs. Id guess 25-35lbs. However it smoothness that will tell if your drags working good. smooth=good jerky=bad.
     
  5. griz

    griz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,744
    State:
    Murray Ky.
    Most manufacturers recomend the drag be set at 1/3 the recomended line size, if the reel is designed for say 30lb line then the drag should be set at 10lbs.
     
  6. cathouse

    cathouse New Member

    Messages:
    313
    State:
    NY
    OK so i guess you can't expect nor should i want the drag to tighten to a complete lock down if i am under standing correctly, the drag is plenty smooth and i suppose with PP 65# test the drag should give before the line does even with the drag at its maximum tightness and if i should need more pressure use the thumb accordingly.Thanks a bunch to all of you for your help.
     
  7. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    That 1/3 setting is not from a direct pull from the reel, but with the line through the guide and pulling on the rod. The rod is part of the drag. Though, after you get used to it, you can probably get pretty close to the right drag setting by just pulling line from the reel.
     
  8. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    The rule of thumb is 1/3 of the reel's line rating. But I do it like most people, by feel. I tend to go with a fairly loose drag in open water, but tighten it down in places where a 10-20ft run is likely to result in a lost fish, such as around snags or next to a wing dike.

    My limited experience with a 209 is that the best the drag will do is something under 15lbs, and will not lock down on heavier line.
     
  9. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    The tighter your drag,the worse snatch you will have on everything when you put your reel in gear when a fish is taking your line and bait out.The heavier and faster the fish,the worst it is on your gear.If your gear survives it,then it still has to stand up to the rest of the fight.Tight line fishing avoids this,but it is best to tie your gear off to something.5lbs.will pull many a hook out of the soft tissue in a cats mouth.7 1/2 lbs.is all that I can handle Max.at my best times now,but I am crippled.3-5 was my usual heavy setting in salt water at my best times with heavy reels.I would not want to "engage" a 17/0 Penn at more than that.That is my opinion.I tear up few reels compared to many.I would ease the drag to it after engaging the reel if needed.A drag is nothing but a adjustable brake for your reel.My star drags were always tested and marked at home with a white paint stick,before fishing.Now I have never targeted large fresh water fish,and few large saltwater.The small fish ate better.I have kept and rigged heavy rigs for my friends and family as some of them enjoyed it.I also learned a lot helping and occasional working on a charter in Florida as a kid.Now in heavy cover you have little choice but to go to the heaviest drag that your reel is built to handle.Every one else is in the same boat as you when it comes to drag.Fish and conditions decide the correct drag.I think that it is as important as the right bait.All of the reel manufactures that I have ever talked to,recommend setting your drag for the maximum line test that your reel is recommended for to keep from damaging it.In your case that is 20lb.line,not the 65 lb.that you have on it.peewee-williams
     
  10. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Lancaster, Ohio
    These guys have made some good points. The one I think that is overlooked by most of us is "what is the reel designed to take"? if the drag is set too high above the design of the reel you probably won't have a failure the first time you hang a big fish but you will accelerate the wear on the drag, gears, bearings, etc.

    It is good to look for the line capacities stamped on the reel. This is usually the minimum and maximum test line that the reel will was designed for and the range of line sizes it will perform best. Unfortunately Penn doesn't stamp this info on the reel side plate. I pretty much use their catalog to find the line capacity and use it as the max line size. As peewee said, 20 lb test for a 209 & 140 Squider and 30 lb test for a 309 & 500 Jigmaster.

    I used to think this didn't sound right. Those numbers are pretty small and then you are supposed to set the drag to 1/3 of the number. That means a 7 lb pull at the end of the rod for a 209 and 10 lb pull for a 309 or Jigmaster. With a 6 foot rod I can pull that much line tension and hold it for some time. With a 7 foot rod it is more difficult. I suspect that there are not many of us that can pull a line tension of 10 lbs at the end of a 12 foot rod and hold it for 10 minutes. The simple laws of physics are just flat against us. The longer the rod the more against us they are.

    I finally concluded a good, low memory, 30 pound test mono on a 7 or 8 foot rod is all I'm man enough to handle. So I better fine tune my fighting skills.
     
  11. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    most of you missed the point of this thread entirely he asked how to tell if his drag was working properly not how to set it and fish it. he just was wanting to know if he needed to fix it or fish it. sorry to critisize those trying to help but alot of folks get way off track trying to preach the same stuff over and over again ending up way off the original topic and not providing the help needed. having a ruff start today thanks for letting me vent:angry: :embarassed: :big_smile: