Winterizing your Outboard Motor.

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by peewee williams, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Winterizing the 2 and 4 cycle Outboard Motor.Gas and oil stayed pretty much the same for most of my life.Most of the change was slow.Much was good.Some was bad.Gas,oil and additives are constantly changing now,along with manufactures recommendations.As I value your opinions,I would like to ask the gentlemen of "Bob and Bubba's Outboard Advice" for their latest recommendations on "Winterizing" our 2 and 4 cycle motors with the products now on the market.Thanks,peewee-williams
     
  2. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Pee wee You can go to about any local shop a get some fogging oil. add stabil stabilizer to the fuel and check the lower unit and change to oil in it and the gasket around the fill and drain screws.
    As for the fogging oil I use PB blaster because it has anti corrosion additives in it and I use staibil or sea foam for the fuel.


    Now Bob fools with these things for a living and he most likely knows more about the latest products on the market
     

  3. Stainless

    Stainless Member

    Messages:
    185
    State:
    Ft Smith, AR
    I'm glad this question was asked because I was wondering the same thing. One question that I have is how to make sure there is no water left in the two stroke engines?
     
  4. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

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    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    I meant to add that Corey but forgot it. Just stand that motor straight up and all the water will run out. I have seen some guys that live up in the cold country take anti freeze and put it in a barrel and add water and circulate it through the motor.

    Just stand it up and all the water will fall out and make sure you check the lower unit because it will freeze and burst the housing.
     
  5. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Here is an articl some one wrote up that I snaged a long time ago and it has some good instructions in it. It is written a lot better then I could write it up.


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    WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR STORAGE
    Proper preparation for periods of extended storage of your outboard requires a comprehensive look at the entire boat/motor/trailer package. Of course, if you just have a small "kicker" that you use on a cartopper, the only thing you have to deal with is the motor itself!
    Gather the following items, along with your boat, fuel tank filled, in an area where you can run the motor on your "flush" attachment.
    Applicator containers of: storage "fogging" oil, fuel stabilizer like Sta-Bil or OMC 2+4, anti-corrosion spray, and a good spray lube product like LPS2 or OMC 6 in 1. A trailer jack. Your toolbox.
    Proceed as follows. First, add some fuel stabilizer to the gas in the recommended amount. In fact, the best thing to do is add it before you fill up the tank! Why fill the tank? (After all, its gonna sit - right?) This will prevent a couple of unpleasant things from happening. Condensation. And oxidation and subsequent spoilage. I hope you can get undoped gas - oxygenated and gasohol Fuels are a NO-NO! if you cannot get anything else, you must COMPLETELY drain ALL the fuel system. And I mean AAALLLL. The lines, the VRO on OMC motors, the whole monkey. This stuffs deadly. Start the motor on the flush, run it up to warm and to ensure that the treated fuel gets in to the whole system. Apply the fogging oil to the carburetors equally - some motors have a fitting you can apply this thru, most you will have to look around for openings to shoot the stuff through, maybe even remove the silencer cover. You'll get lotsa' smoke. Great. So disconnect the line and run the motor out of gas at IDLE. Keep fogging. Note OMC motors with VRO system you will have to shut it off and drain the carbs manually or depend on the stabilizer. If you try to run the gas out, the VRO will fill the carbs with oil, this will turn to goo by spring.After the motor is run , unhook the flusher and drain the gear case and refill with fresh lube. If there is water in the old stuff, it could freeze and burst the case. Pull the spark plugs , tilt up and spray more storage fogging oil in the cylinders directly, turn it by hand to distribute it on the cylinder walls

    This should take care of the motor innards. But - wait - you're not done yet. Here's the good stuff. Clean the powerhead up to remove accumulated crud and any salt deposits.Let it dry, douche it good with the 6 in 1 or equivalent, coat electrical connections with anti-corrosion spray.
    Next, (unless you have hydraulic steering) disconnect the steering link arm from the motor and unscrew the big nut on the motor tilt tube. remove the steering cable from the motor and extend the cable all the way out. Run an oily rag down the tube to remove all the crud from the bore. Clean all the gunk off the cable and let it hang down for awhile to get any water out. then spray it, and the tube with the anti-corrosion spray. Leave it off and extended, hang it up under the well where it won't get in the weather. For hydraulic, remove the extenders that hold the cylinder and remove the rod thru the tube, clean as above. You ain't seen grief til this stuff all seizes up and you get the bill.
    When you have the boat where you are going to store it, disconnect the battery and REMOVE IT from the boat, put it inside on a board and keep a trickle charger on it a couple days a month. Clean the terminals with soda and spray with the anti-corrosion treatment. Spray the area around the base of the powerhead and the trim (if equipped) with anti - corrosion. If the inside of your motor cover has a foam sound blanket and you use the motor in saltwater, see if it is a closed cell foam, if not RIP IT OUT! Salt is hygroscopic, that is it attracts moisture and the 2 do a great job of eating up the motor. All OMC motors use cheap foam. 86 it quick! Store the motor tilted DOWN to running position. And when you put the cover back on, don't wrap the motor in a piece of plastic or a "Blue" tarp. cover it up with a cloth cover and set a piece of plywood or something on top to keep rain off. Otherwise condensation will never dry off the block. Same for the boat. It's gotta breathe. If you have a really fancy rig to store outside, have a pro come out and shrink wrap the BOAT. Not the motor.
    Last, but not least, attend to the trailer. Jack it up and pull the wheels and hubs. Repack the bearings, if you have buddy bearings, ensure they are full. Put the thing on blocks and store the tires in the shed. Spray anti - corrosion on any unprotected iron.
    SO there you have it. with any luck, on that first nice spring day, your steering will steer, the trailer will roll, the motor will mote and a good time will be had by all. You may even save enough to upgrade that old PC you are reading this on! One last caveat! Check the registrations on the rig & trailer and renew them early so next spring you won't get fuzzed
     
  6. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    That's an excellent post Bubba. I'll add a few things later for particular engines, but for the most part, that's a winterized boat if those directions are followed.
     
  7. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Like I said.Things change.There is nothing wrong and everything right with doing something the way we always do it because it works.Many of these products that we once used to do this are no longer available including the Gasolines and the old paraffin based,pure oil non detergent oils that we had then.I asked a oil company representative teaching us some years back about buying a pure non detergent oil to use in the old 2 cycle motors.He told me that as far as he knew,"no one had one on the market"."The modern non detergent oils had additives to enhance lubrication,prevent breakdown,etc. and could very well damage a 2 cycle engine"."We recommend that you always follow your manufactures recommendation".He acknowledged that this was "imposable as far as he knew".We will often miss out on new but not always better ways if we don;t keep up.Knowledge is the key to success and the chance to use the best that is available to us.Thank you very much.Your help has the potential of saving many thousands of dollars in repair cost to us outboard owners if we will follow your advice.You done us good!Thanks again.peewee-williams
     
  8. roofermike

    roofermike New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Jefferson City, Missouri
    I am a little ignorant about motors, what the heck is fogging oil and what does it do?
     
  9. Stainless

    Stainless Member

    Messages:
    185
    State:
    Ft Smith, AR
    I'm some what ignorant about motors myself but I believe the fogging oil helps lubricate the inner works of the motor from seizing or rusting up, especially the cylinder walls.
     
  10. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    well put corey It takes place while an engine is stored for any length of time.
    Corey has it in about as plain as I can say it. You can purchase it at about and dealer in boats and accessories.
     
  11. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

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    3,039
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    Supply NC
    A bit further on the winterization process;

    Jonson/Evinrude;
    If you can, drain the carbs. A small hex head bolt at the front of the carb bowls can be removed to do this. For smaller engines, other than four stroke, just turn the engine upside down.

    For the four stroke engines, just loosen the small hex head bolt in the carb bowl and the gas will drain. This little bolt is brass and has a slot in it for a screw driver, which I never recommend using.

    Tighten or replace these little bolts right after the gas is drained.

    For oil injected Johnson/Evinrude engines;
    Under the hood of these engines you'll find a little yellow clip on do-dad, usually attached to a hose near the VRO fuel pump. This is supposed to be used to plug the oil line during storage. On the end of this yellow do-dad should be the rubber sleeve that went over the oil intake line on the outside of the engine when it was new. You'll probably never see that. It should be used to cap the oil intake. Tape a rag over it, and plug the line. This is done outside the engine, not by removing any line from the pump.

    Storage of these engines requires that the oil line be disconnected so that when the gas in the carb is drained, or evaporates, oil will not fill up the carbs. I've seen this happen many times and be mistaken for fouled carbs. By draining the oil from the carbs then purging the primer bulb, this condition will clear up. I've yet to see the oil foul the carb. Before you take it in for carb maintenance, try draining and then refilling though the fuel line bulb.

    I don't think I should have to tell you all to place rags or tuck paper towels under the carbs before draining, so I won't:big_smile:

    This oil take over of carbs is usual to just the Johnson/Evinrude. I've not seen it happen in other model engines. Different kind of oil injection pump in other models won't allow this to happen.

    Yamaha's with Oxigen Sensors;
    Never run fogging oil of any type through the engine, it'll foul those 300.00+ little gadgets and ruin your day. Do remove the spark plugs and squirt your storage oil in the cyl's and rotate the engine to spread it around.

    Fuel injected 2 stroke Yamaha's have these little trouble makers on them. The use of a carbon guard additive in these engines is highly recommended.

    That's about all I can think of right now.
     
  12. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

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    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Thanks Bob I learn something new every day from you.

    Good post.
     
  13. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    The best winterization is to never stop using them.:wink: That's how I do it. :lol:
     
  14. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Dave I would venture to say you are right on this assumption but keep in mind the lower unit. You have to check it more often in the winter when using because water intrusion on one days use will render it useless in a hard freeze.
     
  15. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    That's a good point Bubba. That's why I usually change mine right before duck season starts. Being I'm out in my boat all winter also, about the only month it doesn't get used is February. But that's just because I'm recuperating. :lol: So I usually change my lower unit oil in early summer and early winter.