winter...pointers on how to find some channel catfish?

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by Tangler, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. Tangler

    Tangler New Member

    Messages:
    129
    State:
    Sugarcreek, Ohi
    Hey everyone! Its been a couple months since ive had a chance to post anything on here so its good to be back.

    For the last couple weeks, ive accepted that the fishing season is over for me and i would just regroup and hit it hard again next year when the temperature gets back up above bone-chilling.

    However i get to work one day last week and there happens to be a North American Fishing magazine on my desk left by a coworker that knew how i felt about angling and i got the fever...Now i am chomping at the bits trying to find information on winter fishing, buying all kinds of stuff for the season ahead, drawing pictures, making lists, etc.

    As i have said on here before, I live very near to the tuscarawas river and fish its waters a lot. Can anyone give me any pointers on how to find some channels or even what may be biting this time of year? i need to feel that tug that tells me that theres something on the other end of my line!!

    Hell id even settle for a turtle right now as long as i got to think it was a fish on its way in, lol. Help me out if you can. Thanks !
     
  2. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    Welcome back bro.. The channels I get during the cold months are usually caught in deeper wintering areas. Or in the calm eddy areas, off of the main river channel. I also like to downsize cutbaits to small pieces such as the size of a quarter simply fished off of a lead 1/2 oz. jig head. Lighter line and tackle is an easier way to pick up on the light bites I think in the cold water. Cut creek chubs are a fav. Along with shad, cut gill, and sometimes even just the gill heads can be productive. I fish the Tusky some, not late in the year though, most of my fishing is done on the Muskingum. A few warm days on a fairly shallow river could make for a hot bite! I'm sure if you look around you will find them though. goodluck to you.. rollo
     

  3. kenlaw76

    kenlaw76 New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    S.E. Pa.
    I have luck catching channels in deep wintering holes and below warm water discharges.
     
  4. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    Here's a channel cat that was caught a couple years back on a fillet of cut carp. We caught numerous channels this afternoon, this was the biggest one around 15 pounds. We were fishing the river two days before Christmas. Sorry for the clarity, I didn't own a digital then.. Go Get 'Em Bro..:eek:oooh::tounge_out::big_smile: rollo
     

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  5. Tangler

    Tangler New Member

    Messages:
    129
    State:
    Sugarcreek, Ohi
    very nice fish rollo. Looks like hed be fun pulling in.

    I caught a lot of channels out of a small river fed lake that i liked to hit all summer. I dont know much of the depth but i know that the river is just a couple feet deep where it feeds into the pond. i should have a good chance of getting some kitties out of here wouldnt you think? im not familiar with their migratory behavior in such a scenario if they even move at all. the pond is around 25-30 ft at its deepest as far as i can tell. is this deep enough for the cats in the cold months or would most of them move out into the river and stay with the flowing water?
     
  6. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    I look for deep holes:0a22:
     
  7. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I know everyone has said deep holes but a few things I have learned is that just because its the deepest hole in the area doesnt mean it will hold fish. We have a few 19-20 ft deep holes that we fish in the winter and while the stray cats are there, we catch just as many in the mid depths ( 7-9 feet range) and better yet if there is a gravel bottom and some slight current, if there actively feeding, they will be in the current!! I do not normally have any luck in muddy eddy's unless the river is up several feet and chocolate, then they will be stacked in eddys staying out of the heavy current and you can really whack them in big numbers when that happens all through the winter. Those muddy flats seem to be the ticket in early spring when the fish are sunning themselves on the warmer muddy bottom, then we do well for them in those areas.
    Salmonid
     
  8. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I have posted the same for wintering flats Mark.. Some of the deepest aren't always the best for wintering fish. I think the flats need a current obstruction of some sort and structure to hold.. Channels seem to venture out alittle more at times, and some decent weather gets them going fairly quick. I like holes that are adjacent from the main river channel to be honest. These are often ones on outside bends, that the main channel may wash out in higher water conditions, but the actual channel doesn't hug and stay along the bank long before turning back to the system. These pocket areas with a lack of current seem to be hot spots for me. I have found some of them mid range spots as well... The channels seem to suspend at times, hopefully I we will get some good ice this year and I can try to get them through the ice!! Good post bro...rollo
     
  9. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    the ice-fishing was directed towards lakes and ponds..lol... im not one of those nuts!:smile2: rollo
     
  10. Still_Waters...

    Still_Waters... New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    Ohio
    If your looking for channels through ice I heard, haven't got to try yet, that channels will suspend in anywhere from 5 foot of water to just off the bottom, and they also like to hang out under large schools of shad and gorge on the die off, but like everyone has said slow and small is usually the best way to go in winter/cold water for bait, because it seems like you almost have to smack them on the nose in order to get a good response, but then again, this is mostly hear-say, and a little bit of personal experience. :wink: