wild mushrooms

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by river scum, Oct 11, 2005.

  1. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    i know most of you know about morels.dose anyone hunt fall mushrooms like these puffballs?
     

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  2. Schoe

    Schoe New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Moline ILL.
    Yes, I have found and tried to cook the Puff Balls with no success at all. After trying several different ways I gave up on them years ago. I hope some one comes up with a good way to fix them. Schoe
     

  3. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    we just season flour n fry in butter. some likesum some dont i guess. nice site you have goin schoe,congrats brother.
     
  4. Marshallmth

    Marshallmth New Member

    Messages:
    61
    State:
    Dayton Ohio Area
    Yeah, fried puff balls is the only way I kow of too. I seem to alway find them next to Paw-Paw trees. Which I think also taste good.
     
  5. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    PUFFBALLS (LYCOPERDON spp. and CALVATIA spp.)
    Description: Depending on their size, puffballs have been mistaken at a distance for everything from golf balls to sheep.

    These round or pear-shaped mushrooms are almost always whitish, tan or gray and have no stalks. The interior of a puffball is solid white at first, gradually turning yellow, then brown as the mushroom ages. Finally, the interior changes to a mass of dark, powdery spores, Size: 1" to 12" in diameter, sometimes larger.


    When and Where: Late summer and fall; in lawns, open woods, pastures, barren areas. On soil or decaying wood.

    Cautions: Each puffball should be sliced from top to bottom and the interior examined. It should be completely white and featureless inside, like a slice of white bread. There should be no trace of yellow or brown (which will spoil the flavor) and especially no sign of a developing mushroom with a stalk, gills and cap.

    Cooking Hints: Remove outer skin if it is tough, then slice, dip in batter and fry.
     
  6. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus)
    Description: Those hardy souls who take long winter walks are sometimes treated to the sight of a snow-capped mass of fresh oyster mushrooms growing on a tree or log.

    This large white, tan or ivory-colored mushroom is named for its oyster shell-like shape. It has white gills running down a very short, off-center stem. Spores are white to lilac, and the flesh is very soft. Oyster mushrooms usually are found in large clusters of overlapping caps and always on wood. Size: 2" to 8" wide.

    When and Where: Spring, summer, fall and during warm spells in winter. On trees and fallen logs.

    Cautions: This mushroom has a number of look-alikes, (including Crepidotus and Lentinus spp.), but none are dangerous. they may however, be woody or unpleasant-tasting. Check by tasting a small piece. Watch out for the small black beetles which sometimes infest this mushroom.

    Cooking Hints: Soak in salted water to remove bugs. Dip in beaten egg, roll in cracker crumbs and fry.
     

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  7. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    thanks for the info spoonfish.
     
  8. flatheaddundee

    flatheaddundee New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    Madison,MS
    Oyster shrooms and puffballs taste great to me. I don't need no store bought mushrooms to have a good meal get em myself!
     
  9. rodpod

    rodpod New Member

    Messages:
    518
    State:
    Evansville, Ind
    Wow, I didnt know about those mushrooms. My mother and I go morel hunting every year in the spring. We usually bring home over a thousand in a few weeks. My mom doesnt even eat them she just likes to get out and hunt them. If she found out there was shrooms to find in this weather, she would be dragging me out there. LOL Are these found in southern indiana? And how do you prepare these things?