Wild mushroom medley

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by micus, Oct 15, 2008.

  1. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    Went down to the family camp on the Jacks Fork for the last week of September, the main activity is fishing of course and we have one meal we keep fish for. This is the only time we keep fish during the year at camp.

    We like to have wild mushrooms with the meal so I went out in the morning and did some scratching around, These are the edibles that I kept for the meal. NOTE: do not combine different species like this unless you know exactly how each person tolerates each species or you might not make it to being an OLD mushroom hunter.

    I cooked them plain in a little vegetable oil, served with fresh fried okra and various species of sunfish including smallies.

    A. Indigo Milky, B. Cinabar Red Chanterelle, C. Smooth Chanterelle, D. Purple Gilled Laccaria, E. Old Man of the Woods, F. Coral, G.Lycoperdon perlatum (Puff Ball), H. Calvatia cyathiformis (Puff Ball)
     

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  2. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Mike,I wish we had wild edibles like that around here.
     

  3. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    Mike you are very well schooled on wild plants. Mushrooms are something
    that I enjoy but do not know anything about. I know there are foolers that
    to the untrained eye they appear to be a different type when they are deadly
    I just leave them all alone.
     
  4. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks Mike! Great find! Sounds like a good meal to me. I would like to find some oyster mushrooms, but I don't know where to start looking. :embarassed:
     
  5. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    This time of year (They are year round) look on dead hardwoods especially old growth, standing or down. They stay fresh a lot longer with the cooler weather.
     
  6. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    Also look for swampy or wet areas. Riverbottoms, etc. If a dead hardwood tree falls in the mucky wet mud. They grow good. If it's too dry, they'll never pop out. I love oysters. I ate a bunch lastnight in spaghetti. I look for them every year. It's one of the few species I can positively identify without fear of getting a poisonous look-a-like. Those and coral fungi. The coral fungi are awesome to eat. they taste naturally spicy.
     
  7. Don Wessling

    Don Wessling New Member

    Messages:
    316
    State:
    IL.
    The season is almost here in Southern Illinois for morals. We had 2" rain yesterday and the temps are supposed to be close to 70 for next several days. They should be poppin. Usually find over 500 every year. In the fall, I usually find over a hundred lbs. of Hen of the woods.