Why mono leader on braid?

Discussion in 'Fishing Line Review' started by WaltonsMountain, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. WaltonsMountain

    WaltonsMountain New Member

    Messages:
    233
    State:
    Nebraska
    I'm confused as to why people use mono leaders on braid. I've even heard of people using a lighter lb mono leader than their braid which seems even more crazy!

    People say not to worry because you are only losing the weight then, but i use a carolina rig so if i lose the weight i'm also losing the swivel, bead, leader and hook....

    I'm confused..... what's the benefit of having a mono leader on a braided line? :eek:oooh::big_smile::confused2:
     
  2. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    Braided line is not abrasion resistant at all.
    Mono is. Well quality mono anyways.:smile2:
    Makes sense to have the business end have a little protection.
    I just use mono, but thats a big reason why those who use braid use a mono leader.
    If you use a light mono for a leader and you get snagged, usually you will just loose your hook, not the weight. For many the weights cost more than the hooks.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2009

  3. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    You use lighter mono leaders so you don't break the braid. I use a Carolina rig with 65# braid and a 40# mono leader. If I get hung up the mono will finally break. You don't loose your swivel, weight and bead..just the leader and hook.
     
  4. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    Because, on the business end of catching catfish, braid frays, then parts.
    Mono is used as it is tougher,, less resistant to abrasion, and provides a bit of shock absorber function..
    Whether you're dragging your line over rocks, deadfalls, or the rough "teeth" of the fish,, etc. Mono is better to handle that sort of thing.
    Braid is stronger for Pulling, Mono is tougher for fighting..
    If you're using 100# braid, and a 50# Mono leader, supposedly, If you become snagged, you can break it off easier...:big_smile:
     
  5. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    Hmmm, I meant mono is More resistant to abrasion,,,
     
  6. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    I put a crosslock snap on the end of the braid. You can switch rigs without losing a foot of line every time. Some people are just fine with a 1/2 full spool but it kills casting distance.
     
  7. tangell88

    tangell88 New Member

    Messages:
    36
    State:
    Tennessee
    what keeps the lighter mono leader from breaking when u have a big fish on?
     
  8. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    If your leader is 40# or higher the only thing that can break it is structure. Your drag on your reel wont even hold 20# of drag.

    No fish will break the line, only abrasion will. If a #40 mono leader is your weakest point you are really in good shape. Just think...lots of guys even run #20 mono mainline and they dont break their lines ; )

    A 40 or 50# mono leader is far from weak.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2009
  9. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    I could not have worded it better.
     
  10. Magnus777

    Magnus777 New Member

    Messages:
    30
    State:
    Arkansas
    I agree 100%. The only reason to use such heavy line at ALL for freshwater fish is because of abrasion. Big Game fish in the open ocean over 100lbs. are regularly caught on 30lb test. Fish of several hundred pounds are caught on 50lb test line, because it's the flexing of the pole that fights the fish, and it's the function of the drag which keeps the line from breaking. Set the drag too high, and POW!, the line breaks...set it too low, and you'll watch every yard of line speed off your reel till it hits the knot. But in freshwater, around heavy structure where our prefered gamefish like to hide, your number one enemy is abrasion. Cat men use the heavy line and stout equipment to winch Mr. Whiskers up out of the rocks, and log jams. But a big cat is a mean, and ornery critter...you've got to pull him out of the thick before he gets a chance to wrap your line around something, or cut it on a rock...but set your drag to high with that heavy line and you're asking for a broken pole, or a busted reel.
     
  11. joshmorgan

    joshmorgan New Member

    Messages:
    30
    State:
    columbia, MS
    I use 50# braid for the main line for the 75 to 80 yrds I can cast with it. U aint gonna get more than about 40 yrds with 50# mono. And the mono leader is a must for it's abrasion resistance.
     
  12. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    High pound test mono is thick and has a lot of memory. Thats why I dont spool up full with it. It seems to birdnest and stuff. But its very abrasion resistant. Braid is thin and has very little memory and casts well but gets comprimized easily by rocks and such. thats why I use braid with mono leader. Using lighter mono than braid saves you sinker and swivel too!
     
  13. thunderchicken

    thunderchicken New Member

    Messages:
    769
    State:
    Yuma Az
    Many old timers use to call a leader a shock leader before all the fancy superlines came out to indicate the purpose of the leader was to absorb initial shock of a vicious strike as it has the ability to stretch before reaching breaking strength. This would also help preserve your main line which was usually more expensive.

    :cool2:
     
  14. Rollinunknown

    Rollinunknown New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,286
    State:
    Missouri
    well i use 30lb test and never have had 1 problem... ill try to show the way i rig tomorrow . I learn from a guy who ran missouri for 40+ years and gets 40s 50+lbs a fish a week .... on a 12ft gold surf pole 30lb line 4 oz sinker and skipjack.
     
  15. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    I've always considered a shock leader a length of heavier mono ( the length of the pole and then some ). It is use for long distance casting with big weight. We have some guys here on BoC that compete using these methods. The lighter main line would snap while casting the weight they use...this is where Shock leader comes into play, it withstands the initial " shock " from casting.

    Interesting how many definitions there are depending on where you come from ; )
     
  16. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
    If you only take in one thing this year, DITCH the mono leader and switch to FLUOROCARBON leader material. Roundhill kept after me to switch to fluorocarbon, every time I told him of a leader failure with my 50# mono. Man, I lost a heap of trophy fish! Like many others, including Jimmy Jonny, I use a leader with less test than my main line so I only lose hook and leader, and save swivel, bead and lead when breaking off. Examine the fluorocarbon leader material, and you can see and feel the difference. It's TOUGH stuff! It's not as susceptible to UV ray damage either. I use 100# Power Pro, and a 60# fluorocarbon leader. The Fluorocarbon is SO tough, that occasionally my 100# Power Pro will break before it does. The fluorocarbon is SO much more abrasion resistant than mono as well. The only drawback is price as it is not cheap. I pay about $17 for 25 yards of it. Worth every dime of it though when you hook into a trophy and have 100% confidence in your terminal tackle. We fish HEAVY cover in the Pee Dee with 95% of my fishing, thus the heavier than normal setup. Some of you may have seen the tree I pulled up from the canal at the Santee with the braid/fluoro combination.

    Bill in SC
     
  17. BajaCoop

    BajaCoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,199
    State:
    Poplar Bluff,MO
    Here is my reasoning behind how i rig up.

    I use a braided main line because I want to have a high strength line but still have the ability to cast quite a ways and also want to be able to have 250-300 yards of line on my reel without having to have a reel the size of a 5 gallon bucket. Also for those people that fish in heavy current because braid is a much smaller diameter it has less drag in the water adn you can often get away with a smaller sinker than if you were using heavy mono.

    I use a mono leader for abrasion resistance and for shock absorbtion.
    I use a leader that is lighter in weight than my main line so that i can break off just my leader if i get snagged and not break my main line with 100 yards of line out and then have to respool. Even though the leader is lighter than the main line it is still more than adequate to fight a 100 plus pound fish.
     
  18. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
  19. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
    I sent ya some reps to get your mojo up and running Magnus. Your reply is spot on! WELCOME to the BOC from South Carolina!

    Bill in SC
     
  20. WaltonsMountain

    WaltonsMountain New Member

    Messages:
    233
    State:
    Nebraska
    Thanks for the info so far guys.... much appreciated! :cool2: