Why is Cajun Red line "invisible"

Discussion in 'Fishing Line Review' started by GrainDrain, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. GrainDrain

    GrainDrain New Member

    Messages:
    88
    State:
    Texas
    If this cajun red line is invisible to fish and because it is red then why do people have baits that have red hooks to resemble blood? why do people say fish bite at the color red and stuff like that? I dont really understand the concept of having a color that disapeers in one situation but is a feeding instinct in another?
     
  2. T-Bone

    T-Bone New Member

    Messages:
    1,125
    State:
    South of Dallas
    Another Brother from Texas! Welcome to the BOC Sir.
    We have talked about this in another thread and some of what has been said is: Red is the first color to disapear in the water. The line really does fade away unlike some of the green line that I have used. Plus I can see the line real good during the day (so it helps my tired eyes see it).
    Red hooks are just a sales pitch. The red comes off the hook and then it's just another hook again. They tell ya that it makes a fish think the bait is bleeding, will I and others also think the sales guys are just tryin to sell more hooks.
     

  3. GrainDrain

    GrainDrain New Member

    Messages:
    88
    State:
    Texas
    That would make sense, and is most likely true about the line disapeering but why do fish go after baits that have red gills? is there just an absense of color or image there? and how do we know what they see?

    Another thing on that: The camo commercials that ask how many hunters do you see, does it matter how many i see? doesnt it matter how many hunters the prey sees?

    But thanks for your answer i just dont get it other than for what you said, i had the same thoughts.
     
  4. elphaba7

    elphaba7 New Member

    Messages:
    795
    State:
    Mo'town, WV
    Good question! I wouldn't have thought red would face in, like that.
     
  5. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Well, The reason it disapeers, is because light can pass through it, giving it no reflective qualities.
    Those red hooks on the other hand, are designed with the fisherman in mind. They don't catch fish any better than any other hook out there does, IMO. It is the flash that makes people buy them, much like a new sportscar, most people would rather have a nice shiney red one than an ordinary gray one, LOL!!!
     
  6. SilverCross

    SilverCross New Member

    Messages:
    1,562
    State:
    Fairbury, Illin
    Welcome to the BOC, GrainDrain.
     
  7. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Remeber that guy you heard about in school: ROY G. BIV?
    It's all his fault. Red has the longest wavelength of visible (to us) color and blue the shortest. Red is the first color to disappear and violet the last. All thing equal if red line disappears then red hooks are a scam but as Grain said, it's what the fish see that matters. Different creatures have different cones (the things in our eyes that see color) and some are able to see extremes of color (infra red & ultra violet) that are invisible to us. Very little catfishing is done in water that is clear enough for this issue to be worth a hoot to us. We either fish so deep, at night or in water too murky for anything to be visible.
    Use whatever line you like to look at...W
     
  8. Nobody Special

    Nobody Special New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    TN
    Maybe the red hooks work better because the fish DON'T see them. Maybe the lure looks more natural because the fish don't see the hooks dangling from them. Maybe it's just another marketing ploy. I have tested them spider rigged crappie fishing with 4 poles with two hooks on each line with red hooks and gold hooks mixed and saw no difference in them.
     
  9. elphaba7

    elphaba7 New Member

    Messages:
    795
    State:
    Mo'town, WV
    Someone told me that the red hooks work good for gill and such, and you can drop them straight down, without bait and the fish will bite. They said the fish think the hook is the worm.

    Now, I've never tried this, but has anyone else heard it? Does that make sense? Maybe gill can see the red. After all, walleye like chartruese and hot pink, right?
     
  10. Mountain Cur

    Mountain Cur New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    Missouri, Warsaw
    Colored hooks are for fisher"men." Those receptors on a fish, around thier mouths and down thier sides(?), think about how well they see with them on a pitch black night or in fourty feet of water. I use Low Vis Green for no other reason than I like the way it "works." I wouldn't care if were pink, well maybe NOT pink, but what do we know about color perception in a fish? They can obviously "see" what is in the water regardless of what color it is.
     
  11. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    Well, it would make sense that red disappears in the water quicker than the other ones, because the red lightwave has the smallest amount of energy since it has the longest wavelength. Since it has less energy, it takes less to absorb all of the light wave's energy, thus leaving no light to see. So if water can absorb x amount of light energy per foot, and red has 12x worth of light energy in each wave, then it would take 12 feet (the supposed limit for red light in water) to make it dissapate. Not only that, but if you are fishing in murkey, muddy, or stained water, everything else will absorb a little of it too. Now violet on the other hand has the most energy since it has a shorter wavelength, so it would have say, 800x light energy. That would take 800 feet for it to dissipate in water, which is (from what I read) about the length that it takes.
     
  12. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    But I thought longer wavelengths (red) travel FARTHER than short wavelengths (blue)? For example, when light hits the atmosphere, it scatters and diffuses the blue photons. This is why the sky is blue when the sun isn't on the horizon, because the blue photons are scattered and reflected all over the place. When the sun IS on the horizon, the light has to travel farther through the atmosphere. The blue photons diffuse and can't make it that far, so all we see are the reds and oranges of a sunset (or sunrise).

    It seems like this would apply to fishing line too, so now I'm really confused. :confused:

    Is the difference due to the fact that the line only absorbs/reflects light vs. the sun, which EMITS light?
     
  13. griz

    griz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,744
    State:
    Murray Ky.
    This is from a website The Physics of Scuba Diving:
    Here are some quick facts about light underwater:

    Colors begin to drop out at varying depths as you dive down.

    Red disappears first at about 30 feet down because it has a longer wavelength.

    Only blues and greens are left at depths below 100 feet.
     
  14. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    Well thats close to right. You are right about the fact that when light hits the atmosphere during the day, it scatters the blue light and then it can come directly to our eyes when we look at the sky. However, when it is evening, if the blue waves didnt make it that far, then we wouldnt be able to see blue in the evenings at all. Since this is obviously false, the blue waves still get through, they just arent visible because they arent refracted directly to our eyes. Instead it is the reds, oranges and pinks that are refracted.

    Now, to explain the waves, we can just say that one wave, from one peak of a curve to the next peak of a curve has a fixed amount of energy for all light. Now if there are more of those waves in a given space, there is more energy in that given space. Red has a long wavelength, so fewer waves fit into a given space than blues and violets, which have a shorter wavelength. If something absorbs energy as light hits it, and there is less energy, then it takes a shorter time for that light to become completely absorbed, while something with a higher energy can give at the same rate and not disappear for a while longer.

    And like Griz said, red disappears because it has a longer wavelength, thus less energy, thus less to propel it farther.
     
  15. GrainDrain

    GrainDrain New Member

    Messages:
    88
    State:
    Texas
    So we can assume the line "disapeers" and we can also assume the red hook deal is a market scam. Then do fish see other fishes gills?
     
  16. Rainman4u2

    Rainman4u2 Guest

    Wasn't this in another thread???? Hmmm, no quote either.....

    Ray
     
  17. Rainman4u2

    Rainman4u2 Guest

    Now I know I saw this in the same thread.....:)

    Ray
     
  18. troller

    troller New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Georgia
    I was told by O'Neil Williams that the red line disappears because it is translucent (light passes through it) and the red on lures and baits is non-translucent therfore is visible to the fish. It seems to be well documented that both work and seem to enhance ones fish catching ability. I haven't tried the line but intend to. I do believe and have faith in red on my bass lures. However as we all know, a product ain't worth spit if the user doesn't believe in or have faith in it. I say give try it a good try and if it don't work chunk it.
     
  19. lilgriz

    lilgriz New Member

    Messages:
    436
    State:
    Aurora, KY
    my opinion on the color issue is that i don't think catfish really care what color it is or if they can see the line or the hook, if it smells good and taste good to them they are going to eat it. i do however use cajun red line, not for the color, but for the strength, low memory, and great abrasion resistance. (the red color does look pretty good on my ABU reels though :) )