Why are used motors so expensive?

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Chief, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. Chief

    Chief New Member

    Messages:
    261
    State:
    Indiana
    i been wanting a small 3-5hp outboard for awhile now and even the old ones from the 50s are like $200 or more. its insane i could get an old beatup pickup truck that still runs for that price
     
  2. slabmaster

    slabmaster New Member

    Messages:
    719
    State:
    missouri
    basicly because of how pricey the new ones are.another reason is because if you take care of a small out board you cant wear it out. i have a brand new 15 hp 4 stroke merc and if i keep it oiled and change the water pump every 2 yrs or so it will be running long after im gone.
     

  3. copycat

    copycat New Member

    Messages:
    1,841
    State:
    New Jersey
    Hey Rex, can I have that 15 HP mercury after your gone? :eek: LOL
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I think thats called "supply and demand". If nobody wanted those motors, they'd be giving them away,...but because people will pay that price, and smile while doing it, the prices will stay high... just like gasoline.
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Is Indiana in the 'rust belt'? The reason I'm asking is that here in Arkansas it's extremely difficult to find a pickup of any age in decent running condition for less than $500. As a matter of fact, if it's got a good engine in it, an old totalled pickup will often bring $500, just for the engine and transmission. Finding an older small outboard in good condition for $200 is much easier than finding an older pickup for $500.
    My first car came out of Cleveland; cost, $100. It was a rustbucket, but ran like a clock. After a year or so of my trying to set new speed records with it, though, it developed a severe knock. Even so, I had no trouble selling it for $100--exactly what it cost. That was in Tennessee.
    Things often have what is called 'place value', meaning that because of an abundant supply an object may be relatively cheap where you are, but relatively expensive where I am; or vice versa.
     
  6. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Some of those old old old ones end up being collectors items. They are worth more to people sitting in a display all cleaned up than they are on the back of a john boat.