Who uses thumb releases?

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by smhmc6, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    I'm interested in trying out one of these thumb releases. From what I gather they aid in back tension shooting and also puts less torque on your bow. I'm a pretty decent shot as it is, but I think the wrist style are kind of annoying. They always seem to get in the way and if you've got to take it off, say to take your coat off and relieve yourself:eek:oooh: theres that loud velcro sound.

    I've looked at a few, I'm thinking that the ones that swivel are probably best that way you could shoot with your palm down or out which ever way was more comfortable. Looks like most models have the same caliper style like the trigger releases I'm use to.... are these better or are the hook style better or is it preference? I think most of these are designed for competitive shooting and the reviews I've read online say that some of them are pretty loud. Granted with an arrow traveling around 320 fps in most cases it probably woulnd't make too much difference, but the thought of a loud release makes me cringe. So if you use them, what do you use, would you recommend it, pros/cons, etc? Thanks for the help guys.
     
  2. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    From my experience with using the back tension releases, I only recommend these styles of releases for PRACTICE only. Not for hunting. Reason being is, your using this release for the surprise release. Not really knowing when the arrow is taking off!! Using back tension, the arrow takes off and gives you the surprise!! That's the correct way of shooting, because your not commanding the release at all, and that allows for no shooting faults. It definently helps in the aid of TARGET PANIC. I've had thiis and can tell you it's not fun. With the use of a back tension release and some smart practice, I was able to overcome this and have gained my confidence in shooting and made myself way more accurate too.

    Don't get me wrong, the wrist style releases are supposed to be used the same way, but instead you wrap your index finger around the trigger and put slight tension on it. Using the back muscles again, this allows more pressure on the trigger and send the arrow on it's way.

    There is different types of back tension.

    1.The push and pull technique. Pushing the bow away with the bow hand (left hand) for right hand shooters, and pulling back with the back muscles.

    2. The trigger squeeze. This is where you slowly squeeze the trigger with the index finger to send the arrow on it's way. The most widely used form of back tension. Back tension is still used.

    3. The trigger punch technique. This is where you command the shot, by aiming on target and punching the trigger. This can be an accurate way of shooting the bow, but can create the most faults too. Like Target panic and anticipating the shot. Not a good way of shooting the bow.

    To get back to the subject of wrist styles of releases. Velcro straps are noisey to put on and take off. Even when pulling back the bow. Some guys swear by using leather straps and even adding more holes in the strap to get that custom feel.

    Myself I use the velcro and take a few practice pulls while in the stand. This helps break in the release and makes it more quiet while the shot counts!! Why I wouldn't use a back tension release for hunting. Because the shot can take so long to get off, especially if your nervous or cold. Never command the thumb knob to make the arrow go!! That's wrong. This can create a bad shot, because of torqueing the bow. That's the way I first used one, before I started using it the right way!!

    Hoping this helps you!!

    Good luck. Just saying to stick with the wrist style and Practice well with it. Get a good one. Spend some extra money if ya can. They're so much better than a cheaper one. Trigger adjustability is great. Adjusting the tension to suit your tastes is key. Just never go to loose with it. That's like having a hair trigger on a gun!! Can make the arrow go off, before you're even ready!! Watching the deer or whatever animal say BYE BYE!!

    Mark.
     

  3. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    Thanks Mark, good post. I've always the wrist style trigger releases. I shoot well with it. I use the method you talked about slowly squeezing the trigger until your shot goes off. I like to sqeeze my whole hand instead of just my finger, I think this helps avoid the "punch". The reason I was interested in the thumb style release is cause I see so many archers using them these days, and I kind of like the idea of just having my release in my pocket or hanging on my bow till I need it. Those wrist ones always seem to get in the way and sometimes bang on the stands or something like that. Also I heard it really aids in shooting correctly. Like I said, I shoot well with my wrist style, so I guess if it isn't broke no need to fix it.
     
  4. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Hey Steve!! I'm not here to steer you away from trying to use a back tension release for hunting. I've watched many hunting shows that showed guys using back tension releases for hunting. I'm thinking Stan Potts of North Amercian Whitetail show, has one and has been a very successful hunter to say the least. If your thoughts take over and you want to try one for hunting, then great, Go For It bro!! I totally understand what your going through!! Archery is such a great sport and we learn so much through trial and error. It was just some advice to take in, so I'm hoping your success in the field is a great one this fall. Hoping you harvest the buck of a lifetime. Just practice you A$$ off and hopefully it comes together for you!!

    Be safe in the stand bro!!

    by the way: wrist style I use is a Scott Silverhorn. back tension is a Carter Chocolate Addiction. Love this release. It's a safe back tension release. Costs more, but I think it's worth it!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2009
  5. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    Thanks Mark, I appreciate the help. It probably wouldn't be bad to get one just for practice. I've always found that rarely do you get those textbook shooting positions in the field, but if you practice right the fundamentals take over. So practicing correctly and practicing alot is a key component to being successful. Thanks again for the advise.