Which cast net to buy?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by JPritch, Feb 2, 2007.

  1. JPritch

    JPritch New Member

    Messages:
    1,852
    State:
    Lynchburg, VA
    I haven't been able to find much info on the type of cast net to buy, only how to throw them.

    I see they come in different radius sizes, mono/nylon, some with the accu-throw ring etc......

    What would be the ideal cast net for somebody with no experience?
     
  2. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,710
    State:
    Independen
    Get about a 4ft radius mono net without the ring on it. Practice with it till you've got it down, then move up in size (maybe to a 6ft). If you're planning on eventually throwing a big net (8-10ft), you'll find the techniques needed will be a little different. Once you've mastered the bigger net, you'll find it's easier to be consistent with it than the small net.
     

  3. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    I would agree with this post. I might add that you consider a mono. net over a nylon.Take a look at Betts Old Salt Premium monofilament net,in a 4' size. This is a good net to learn with and it will do the job so well you will hang on to it a long time.:lol:
     
  4. TomV

    TomV New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    Warsaw, Missouri
    I agree with Doug also. I was going say the same thing, small like 4 foot radius and no ring.
     
  5. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
  6. navigator

    navigator New Member

    Messages:
    199
    State:
    NC- Brunswick County
    it also depends on what you are after.
    I am ok with a net, have a 6ft I bought to catch shad with.
    I went shrimping a couple of times and went and bought a 4footer because it didn't wear me out as much.
     
  7. TA2D

    TA2D New Member

    Messages:
    886
    State:
    Nebraska
    A 3.5 foot or 4 foot raduis is great to start with, I do have a 5 footer in my possesion that I despise throwing, with a smaller net you will yeild less fish, but you will develop a good technique and become fairly accurate.

    Aaron

    TA2D
     
  8. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Check ur local Wal-Mart out they most likely will have some. thats where I bought my net at.
     
  9. coolarrow2

    coolarrow2 New Member

    Messages:
    249
    State:
    Texas
    The blue mono net that walmart sell is a good net. I use the 6' net and it seams to be the best all round one for shad. When it gets stiff you can wash the net in laundry soap and it will get soft again. I wash mine once a year or so.
     
  10. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    I'll go against the crowd and suggest you start out with a bigger net - maybe 6 to 8 ft radius (provided nets that size are legal in your state -- they may not be, so check the regs if you're not sure.) I can throw an 8 or 10 ft radius net with absolutely no problems. But I have a 5 ft radius net that I can throw to save my life. As Doug says, the technique is different for larger nets; if you're ever going to be throwing a big net, it's just as easy to start out and learn with it.

    Mesh size should be 3/8" to 5/8" - certainly not any smaller than 3/8. Bigger mesh size sinks faster but also only catches bigger bait fish. You also want at least 3/4 to 1 lb of lead per radius foot if not more - more lead sinks faster. Cheap nets will have maybe 1/2 to 3/4 lb per radius foot - if the label doesn't say how much, it probably isn't enough.

    If you're catching shad in 4 ft of water, you don't need a fast sinking net. But if you want to get them in 15 or 25 ft of water, you need large mesh and lots of weight as well as a large radius.

    No matter which net you get, soak it overnight in a solution of regular household fabric softener - maybe 1/4 cup to 2 or 3 gallons of water. That will soften the net and make it a lot more manageable to throw.

    I've had good luck so far with Betts Old Salt and Fitec Super Spreader "Pro" series nets. Neither is very expensive (at least not compared to Calusa or Excalibur or some of the other high-dollar jewels) and will last just as long as an expensive net -- that is, it will last until the first time you get it hung up on a stump, boulder, sunken car or whatever and rip a giant hole in it.

    You're always one throw away from needing a new cast net.
     
  11. MoMudCat

    MoMudCat New Member

    Messages:
    186
    State:
    Troy,MO
    I have to disagree with starting out with a small net. I started with a 3.5 footer and got frustrated really fast. Slider showed me how to throw his 8 footer and I have never looked back. I can catch a lot more bait with fewer throws. I find the 8 foot net a lot eaiser to throw for some reason. And as for accuracy, well practice in the yard. I bought an 8 foot bait buster net and really like it. The only thing I dont like is it has over 1.5 lbs per foot. I bought it for using below dams with swift current but wheeeewww it will wear you out quick. Just my two cents.
     
  12. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,710
    State:
    Independen
    If you have a good instructional video or somebody that can help with the bigger net, than by all means start with it. If not, you might get frustrated with it. And by the way, don't put the net in your mouth!:lol:
     
  13. powercat

    powercat New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Olathe,Ks/Fish Gravois Mi
    I would recommend the larger size. I started throwing a net this past summer and was able to get enough bait to fish every day. I learned by placing the net in my mouth but the taste of shad wasn't great. I have been gathering information from the BOC and now need warm weather to learn how without placing it in my mouth. The information that is on this site is amazing.
     
  14. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    Bah! If you don't like the taste of river mud and shad slime, you're not a real catfisherman!

    I'd just as soon not have to hold part of the net in my mouth, but that's the way I learned... I can throw the net very consistently now and put it exactly where I want it. If swallowing a few shad scales is the price I pay, then so be it... :confused2:
     
  15. bank bouncer

    bank bouncer New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    INDIANA
    I've got to go with the 8ft wal-mart net, I'd rather open an 8 ft net 80%, then 100% of a 5 ft net. The method I use is the one In-fisherman has in I think, Predators on the prowl, or Big cat Safari, the method is the same as the one that you use when you put the net in your mouth, but this method you don't, it just stays in your hand.
     
  16. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,710
    State:
    Independen
    That's exactly where I learned and is the method I used. Watching ol' Jimmy Weir catch those monster James River blues.
     
  17. loki1982

    loki1982 New Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    I started with a 4 foot net, slowly worked my way up, and now im throwing a 9 footer.

    In my opinion start small, although as others have said, they liked starting larger. One thing to remember, the larger the net, the heavier it is. I can throw a 4-5 net all day long, but 50 throws of my 9 footer will wear me out.

    Larger nets in my opinion are better for a few reasons. The most ovbious is the fact that the larger the area, the less likely a fish can get away. But I think larger nets may sink slower(kinda like a parachute).

    Something else to think about, will you be throwing from a dock, a boat, or from land? Smaller nets are easier to throw further, so are more ideal for throwing from land. Larger nets are hard to get distance with, so are more ideal from a dock or a boat.

    Also your height is a factor. The larger the net, and shorter you are the more trouble it is to throw. Im 5'4" and I had to come up with my own special way of holding my net to throw it properly. I just dont have the height to grip it the same as a 4-5 foot net and not drag the ground, so I played around until I found a way to throw it.
     
  18. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    I'll go with the crowed that says get a bigger net. Them little nets are a pain. You maybe able to throw them 10 - 15 feet away from you. But you are not going to catch much once the net starts sinking and closing at the same time.
     
  19. powercat

    powercat New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Olathe,Ks/Fish Gravois Mi
    I may have to agree with you and eat shad scales and lake mud if I want to fish with shad.
     
  20. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    big vs small is a good arguement but if I were the person buying the net I'd buy the net to suit the environment I'd be throwing the net in ... if I'm a bank fisherman and fishing below dams where there's a lot of rock that'll claim nets ... especially the big ones then you should go with a 4 or 5 ft net. learning to throw a 4 ft net is quite a sum different than learning to throw and 8 ft net too ... so the learning process starts all over when you go from a small net to a larger net sometimes. if you're boat fishing where there's not much to get hung on then the 8 to 10 ft nets would probably be best. ya don't want to talk someone into getting a big net and then they go down to the dam and lose it on the first through. also the amount of shad that's in the area should be weighed in when deciding what net to get ... if there's tons of shad where you fish then you don't need a big one and using a big net where you'll catch 1000 shad with one throw will kill a lot of them or damage them when you pick the net up and picking up full net full of shad in an 8 ft net on a rocky shore is tough to do without ripping the net up. the smaller nets are easier to throw and are the ideal nets to use below dams ... get a biggun for throwing from a boat where shad aren't as plentiful. get with someone from your area and go fishin with them to see what they use and learn from them ... it shouldn't be hard to find a fishin buddy that's near your area off the BOC. good fishin and I hope this helps ya decide.