When is it too hot for catfish?

Discussion in 'ARKANSAS LAKES / RESERVOIRS TALK' started by catfishcraz, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. catfishcraz

    catfishcraz New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    arkansas
    I am just curious, when is it too hot to catfishing? I mean, they go deeper but I am sure there is a point that they just don't bite. What is the recommended tempatures for catfishing? I used to have a chart for all kinds of fish but lost it somewhere. Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. puppypal

    puppypal New Member

    Messages:
    2,294
    State:
    Sheridan, Ar
    Not really sure if it gets too hot............
    They tend to eat more at night when the sun stops shining in the summer but i have always been told hotter the better bite.
    Here is a bit of information on the catfish cycle etc. Ya might not know the exact data


    Catfish are reported to live up to forty years, attain approximately 1 m (40 in.) in total length and nearly 20 kg (44 lbs) in body weight. In the wild, however, fish over ten years of age, 53 cm (21 in.) in length, and 1.5 kg (3.3 lbs) in body size are unusual. Channel catfish can be sexually differentiated at about 6 months of age and normally breed for the first time in their second or third year of life. Thereafter, catfish will usually spawn every year throughout their life time. The spawning season of catfish is usually during the months of APRIL through JUNE;
    females start laying their eggs at water temperatures above 21°C (70°F). The eggs of catfish are large (2.4-3.0 mm or 0.1 inches in diameter), very adhesive, and usually laid in a large egg mass. Females have large variation in the number of eggs they produce, laying between 3,000 and 50,000 eggs, depending on the age and size of the fish; improved spawning success (number of eggs produced, larger eggs, and egg fertility) are observed in fish three to five years of age. Catfish have an elaborate breeding behavior and the male usually incubates the eggs. The period of incubation (hatching time) of catfish eggs depends on water temperature. Eggs hatch in four to ten days at temperatures between 21 and 27°C (70-81°F); at optimum spawning and incubation temperatures (25°-27°C), embryos hatch in 4 to 6 days. Young absorb their yolk sacs and begin swimming (swim-up stage) 3-4 days after hatching. After yolk absorption, young catfish actively feed on a variety of foodstuffs and readily accept artificially prepared diets.

     

  3. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    I agree with Glenda. July and August are my favorite months to fish.
    It gets to hot to fish in the daytime but the nights are perfect on the
    water.
     
  4. shania

    shania New Member

    Messages:
    5,942
    State:
    San Leandro, Ca
    :0a27:
    In my opinion (& that's not much - lol) - I think that Glenda is right on the money with that one. :0a23:
     
  5. Wiscars

    Wiscars New Member

    Messages:
    93
    State:
    Arkansas
    I agree with Glenda too! Last year in late July we started to fish at 7:30PM. When we got to the dam at Morrilton the bermuda grass was burnt brown and the air temp was 99degrees! When I opened the truck door it was like a pizza oven outside. Just about left right then.:embarassed: But we set up on the bank with the river to ourselves. We were soaked with sweat and hoped for the cool air after dark. Never happened,but we started to tear them up till midnight. First fish was a 12# blue,then a 22#blue followed by a 15# blue then a bunch of 5-8 pound blues and channels all on skips. Hot? Man was it ever.:eek:oooh: Sweat all night till dawn. But I still remember those hard strikes and nice fish.:big_smile: So I think the heat is more a factor with the fishermen rather than the fish. Just my 2cents worth of info for you.:wink:
     
  6. mudcat dale

    mudcat dale New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    Texas
    I don't think it can get too hot for the fish, just the fisherman. My best catches have been in July & August here in TX with the temps in the 90's even after dark. Also, that tends to be when the river is the lowest here and the fish seem to gather up in the deeper holes.
     
  7. catfishcraz

    catfishcraz New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    arkansas
    Thanks everyone, Being from california I remeber I used to fish with my dad at night all the time and caught tons of fish everytime. MOving to arkansas and getting married and alot of issues lately has really taken alot of my time away but am working ongetti8ng that habit developed again. See, I normally get up 230 am to go to work so that is a big change over on the timeclock. But gotta admit, it is true that night time is usually far better for better results. Thanks everyone.
     
  8. 320hotrod

    320hotrod New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    KCMO
    I'm with Mark there, it's more the fisherman than the fish. I still believe in the afternoon bite, as that's always been my most productive time regardless of temperature. But when it comes to heat, most people will fish less and remember mostly that they sweated and burned all day and tend to stay out less or not at all.
     
  9. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    My best luck for BIG blues is in July and August. They are eating alot. I have fished where the water temps were 85deg and the fish were eating. They were in deep shaded areas, but still eating in the middle of the day.
    Good Luck