Whats the best rig for cats

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by General, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. General

    General New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Michigan
    what would you guys say the best rig for catfishing in a river that isnt that fast but not that slow...:confused2:
    -josh-
     
  2. breadboy

    breadboy New Member

    Messages:
    431
    State:
    North Carolina
    I would say a basic fishfinder rig. It consists of an egg sinker above a swivel, and a hook tied to a 1-2 foot leader underneath the swivel. I like to have the leader slightly smaller test than the mainline, in case I snag up. When I do that, I can just lose a hook and not the whole rig.
    Hope this helps.
     

  3. BigCatDreaming

    BigCatDreaming New Member

    Messages:
    263
    State:
    Illinois
    theres to many factors to determine what is or isnt the best rig. Some might work better in small farm ponds than small rivers. Some might be good in big lakes but not work as good in big rivers.
     
  4. katcatchingfool

    katcatchingfool New Member

    Messages:
    2,032
    State:
    illinois
    i use a simular rig as breadboy but my leader is heavier than my main line i always try to atleast double the line weight
     
  5. General

    General New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Michigan
    thanks...i will try that tonight...hopfully
    but thanks again
    -josh-
     
  6. Baitkiller

    Baitkiller New Member

    Messages:
    1,029
    State:
    Akron, Ohio
  7. Redd

    Redd New Member

    Messages:
    790
    State:
    Southeast Kansas
    My favorite rig for the river when its not up, is a 2oz bank sinker and bead on my main line and a barrel swivel for the stop. Then around an 18" leader connected to that. And a good general hook size to use is a 4/0. But if you're goin' after big old fish, I'd go with as far up as a 8/0 for blues and a 10/0 for flats. I usually have my leader the same testline as my main line, but if I have the option, I like it to be heavier so that big flats and blues won't bite through it as easily. Hope this helps.

    -Red
     
  8. General

    General New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Michigan
    thanks i will have to try that too tonight.
    -josh-
     
  9. photocat

    photocat New Member

    Messages:
    803
    State:
    HOCO, Maryland
    the most basic of rigs is a wieghtless one... line to hook then bait and cast out... this works well if the water isn't too fast and is clear of most snags... it gives the bait a more natural drift through the area...

    the other rig i use most often is a carolina rig... weight on line tied to the swivel (not snap) with a bead inbetween to protect the knot then to the other end of the swivel tie the leader and hook... leader length depends on the bottom of the river and current... don't want to get tangled all the time... weights can vary from egg sinkers to no rolls to bank to flat spoon... just depends on conditions... eggs are good for still water because it will roll in current :-(... i use no rolls for the most part because i want the bait to go down and stay where i put it when i cast out... it just seems to work best... i also use bank sinkers for deeper water cause they get down deeper and faster with less water resistance then the no rolls...
     
  10. wishiwasfishin

    wishiwasfishin New Member

    Messages:
    776
    State:
    kentucky
    try a slip float around down trees or rocks you find.
     
  11. breadboy

    breadboy New Member

    Messages:
    431
    State:
    North Carolina
    I almost always use slip-floats in small lakes. It is nice and it is the easiest to see the strikes and hook the fish imo. Haven't tried it in a river, but I don't rivers fish much.