What would you say to making catfish a game species in GA and placing a limit on size

Discussion in 'LOCAL GEORGIA TALK' started by Team Hold EM Hook, May 13, 2009.

Would you back this if it meant saving some catfish?

  1. Yes we need to do something now to preserve our fisheries for future generations to come.

  2. No there is no need for regulations on catfish. (Please explain why not)

Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. Team Hold EM Hook

    Team Hold EM Hook New Member

    Messages:
    272
    State:
    al
    Another member on this forum and I created a petition last year in June to gather some information and see if we would have enough support to pursue having a limit of 1 catfish per person, per day 34" or longer. There are several bodies of water in our state of Georgia that has this potential. In the last few years I have heard of and seen, more and more jugging, limb lines, and trot lines being used. I as well as others have noticed the depletion of the quantity of larger fish that are the breeder stock. We by no means are bashing others using different methods than a pole as I have tried them myself. If we do not preserve these fish now then who will and when? The link to this petition has been pulled off of this catfishing website 3 times that I know of. If and when I get permission to place it back on here I will.
    Team Hold EM Hook
    Joe Northrup
     
  2. boohoo222

    boohoo222 New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    georgia
    you got my support
     

  3. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    In my opinion the catfish are no more in danger than the common cockroach. I support limits, but our own DNR has been shocking and banking 6000 catfish a day out of the Altamaha river alone and have just about givin up hope. Catfish are here to stay and thats why there are no current limits. I said this in one of the threads and I'll say it again. It doesn't matter if every catfisherman in the state votes for this the DNR just wont buy into it. The state wants them over fished. All I can say is good luck in this endevor:wink:
     
  4. puddle jumper

    puddle jumper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,507
    State:
    NW.Georgia
    Joe,
    I got with Paul and exsplained what we are trying to do with this and we now have permision and the backing of the BOC,,
    Thanks Paul..:wink:
    Puddle
     
  5. puddle jumper

    puddle jumper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,507
    State:
    NW.Georgia
    Cretus,
    You are absolutly right ,Ga DNR is not going to do anything that will endanger the ecsystem, However you point was aimed at one river in this state,, the patition is for the intire state and to let ga DNR know we,, " the people that sighned the patition" want to see trophy regs on the apropriet rivers...
    Puddle
    oh,, are you saying you would not like to go down there and land a monster 100lb flatty?:roll_eyes: I know I would...:wink:
     
  6. efrith

    efrith New Member

    Messages:
    1,306
    State:
    Seale Alabama
    I live in Alabama But fish the Chattahoochee river and if there were a size limit on cats there would bigger cat to catch so I'm with you!:big_smile:
     
  7. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    I signed the petition last summer and support this 100%.

    By the way, the Altamaha is a huge river in a remote area of the state that does not get overfished. The Chattahoochee on the the other hand is a much smaller river that gets a lot more fishing pressure. It is getting hit hard by trotliners and limbliners and they are taking way too many big spawning sized flatheads out of the river. They are specifically targeting the bigger fish by using large live baits and I've also personally seen a lot of the big flatheads they catch being wasted and thrown away. I am already seeing a decline in the number of big flatheads we are catching. And it's not just the trotliners and limbliners. Last summer I saw a couple of rod and reel fishermen at the bait shop that had four big flats in the back of their truck that were dead and baking in the sun. I am sure these fish were eventually thrown away. There is no sense in this and we desperately need size and creel limits on this river.
     
  8. macdaddy

    macdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    687
    State:
    GEORGIA
    No you can not hurt the cat fish in the rivers and lake like the flathead once it in there its there to stay you cannot fish it out .....lol try to catch all the crappie out of a smalll farm pound when they have took over can't do it... eat them up not going to hurt them lol You may hurt some feeling but you not going to hurt that river.... only way i see is elec. shock or ppl telephoneing it now that will put a dent in it seen it happen on the Flint river...
     
  9. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper New Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    State:
    Dallas, GA
    I support this as well. I am glad to see the petition being circulated on the board again!
     
  10. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    True, they may be there to stay and you may not be able to fish it out completely, but you could have a much better fishery for both numbers of small ones and for trophy size fish with a creel and length limit. Just ask Alabama and Tennessee. :wink:
     
  11. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    The Best Tennessee Catfish Fishing

    Because there are plenty of fine lakes and rivers all over Tennessee, catfish fishing is good throughout the state. Regardless of your location, you can find excellent fishing holes to reel in the trophy-sized cats. Beware, though, because the reason there is such an abundance of oversized cats in the state is because Tennessee catfish fishing is highly regulated.

    While you don't have a limit as to the number of cats you take home after a good day of fishing, make sure that you never leave with more than one on any given day that exceeds 34 inches in length. Get ready to have a tough time deciding where to start - the rivers in Tennessee set a precedence for some of the best catfishing in the nation.
     
  12. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    Catfish size-limit regulation established

    Posted by Alan Clemons, The Huntsville Times November 28, 2008 7:00 AM

    Anglers are now restricted to possession of only one catfish longer than 34 inches from Alabama waters following approval of a new regulation.
    The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division was approached several times in the last couple of years about setting a size limit on catfish in state waters. Concerns focused on the continued practice of "pay to fish" lakes from other states contracting for capture of the big fish that were hauled in tanker trucks to those lakes.

    In essence, Alabama's resources were being raped and nothing was being done. Thousands of pounds of fish each year -- some of them the big 50-pounders and up -- were being taken away to another state so someone could pay to sit by a hand-dug pond and catch them. State officials were told repeatedly this was being done but nothing could be done to stop it because there was no regulation on possession number or a size limit.

    Thankfully, now there is.

    The new regulation is that only one catfish longer than 34 inches may be harvested and possessed each day by an angler.

    Furthermore, no live blue catfish or flathead catfish longer than 34 inches may be transported out of Alabama without approval in writing from the Commissioner of Conservation and Natural Resources.

    Catfishing is popular, fun, traditional and there's no limit on keeping fish 34 inches or smaller. If you want to catch 109 blues and keep them, so be it. Trotlines, jug fishing and limblines are wonderful ways to have fun and put some fish in the freezer for your family or a fish fry.

    Despite the abundance, Conservation officials say catfish grow slowly and it takes several years for them to attain significant size. A research study on Wilson Lake by Auburn University in 2006 and '07 showed blue cats take about 13 years to grow to 34 inches. Flathead cats can take up to 20 years to reach that length.

    This is a good move but only will be beneficial with enforcement.

    Actually doing something about it will be critical. I hope state officials check anglers at boat docks where catfishing is known to be hot -- especially the Tennessee River lakes, with Wilson being a key fishery hammered by catfishermen -- and cite violators.

    Making a regulation but doing nothing about it is moot. Put some teeth into it.

    Kudos to the Southern Catfisherman Association, Conservation Advisory Board and DCNR for taking the first step.
     
  13. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Good post Paul but I'd like to point something out. The average lifespan of a flathead catfish is 14 years and not to exceed 20 years. So these 80 and 90 pound fish are at that size because of their feeding habits and not age.
     
  14. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    True, they live for 14 to 20 years, but they don't get to 80 or 90 pounds just from their eating habits. A 5 or 6 year old flathead is not going to weigh 80 or 90 pounds, no matter how much it eats. LOL
     
  15. Team Hold EM Hook

    Team Hold EM Hook New Member

    Messages:
    272
    State:
    al
    I can agree and disagree on this. They can have all the food in the world but if they do not have the time to grow then it does not matter how much food they have. I read somewhere that catfish need a few years on them before they can spawn.
     
  16. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    Flatheads reach sexual maturity at 3 to 6 years. Scientists estimate that a female will lay 1200 eggs for every pound she weighs. A female flathead that weighs 50 pounds might release 60,000 eggs at a time.
     
  17. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    What's your opinion OconeeAaron? :big_smile: LM_O
     
  18. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    i signed it back when it first popped up around here........I would love some catfish regulations here in GA where most refer to catfish as a " trash fish". I see oconee getting jugged to death every summer I've lived here.......and most juggers don't CPR.....LoL Eventhough most juggers target smaller catfish.....there've been numerous 50 lb fish taken on jugs on oconee......and we sure don't have a surplus of 50 lb fish here....On the other hand I think a jugger taking out 30-40 fish under 10 pounds could help the trophy fishery....cause there does seem to be a good quantity of 10lb fish here. I just hate to see those pictures of 5 or 6 good fish laying dead or hangin from a tree. One over 34" sounds good to me!
     
  19. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    How about you Stumpjumper? Would you say Tennessee has some good catfishing? :big_smile: LM_O
     
  20. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    How about it Brother Hilljack? Does your club have an opinion on creel and size limits? :big_smile: