What would be your #1 boat choice

Discussion in 'LOCAL ARIZONA TALK' started by hoosier angler, Oct 24, 2005.

  1. hoosier angler

    hoosier angler New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    Arizona
    I am trying to deceide if I should bring my boat out here or just buy another one more suited to this location. I would like to be able to fish the rivers and lakes, maybe even go up to Powel for some striper action. It sounds like water levels change here quite a bit. Does the salt river dry up? Is their some other reason you can't navigate it rocks, dams, rules ect..? I did talk to a FS officer this summer and as I understand it going up the verde (above Bartlett) is off limits to power boats? He said something about being off limits during the eagle nesting period to any access except for floating downstream without stopping. I would like your views on this one, I don't plan on deceiding real soon. It took me a bunch of experience back home to figure out what worked for me there.
    (experience = Midwest term for screwing up a lot!) It sounds like you fellows get out quite a bit and I would value your thoughts. I currently have a 16 foot Lowe big jon (wide & deep) 30 horse four stroke tiller, 26 horse mud motor.
    I failed to mention I am a duck hunter. I know it's the desert, but any chance of some of that here. Thanks JA
     
  2. capt.kirk

    capt.kirk Guest

    i cant really give you any real good advice,except you may want to take
    it with you to use for tradeing for something more suited to your new
    location.i have made my share of boat misteaks also,probably been thru
    10 boats in the past 20 years.if you decide not to take it with you where
    in indiana is it,and what do you want for it?i am retired to florida,but from
    connersville in. we took what was supposed to be a 2 week vacation up
    that way back in late august 1 week to visit the kids 1 week to go down
    to barkley lake,i got so sick after the first week that we cancalled the
    fishing trip to get back down here.i have a new NITRO and just left it in
    my son in laws garage in indiana,i have a small boat here but i sure do
    miss my new boat,i may be moving some where back north if i can sell
    this home here,then i will hook up with my boat,thats about all i can tell
    you,didnt help a bit did i.
    KIRK :D
     

  3. tdpasser

    tdpasser New Member

    Messages:
    829
    State:
    Gilbert AZ
    I think your jon would be fine unless your planning on trolling a lot. like for stripers and trout. the flat bottom of the jons get blown around in the wind a bit but i've always liked jons.
     
  4. asukevin

    asukevin New Member

    Messages:
    88
    State:
    Tempe, AZ
    hoosier angler, yes there is some good duck hunting, and i do believe that it is up north in the white mountains. check out azgfd.com for details on that.
     
  5. TIM HAGAN

    TIM HAGAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    State:
    Walkersvil
    i have looked at many different boat but i went with the smokercraft sportmens 20 ft jon all open inside loads of room very well made high sides.
    handles the wind very well check out my site theres a link for them there just something to check into .
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I like the flat bottomed low freeboard with a high bow in a center console configuration.
    I refuse to use a net in landing fish so lower sides are better for me. Lower sides also give a lower profile which in turn gives less for the wind to catch. Thats another plus if you fish open water.
    You can make a flat bottomed boat track better by simply installing a long tapering skeg that hangs down a couple of inches. Easier done on a wood boat of course.

    I prefer the center consoles because it's a fish around boat instead of a fish through boat. I took a lesson from the SKA boats on that. (Southern Kingfish Association).
    With the high bow, something of the dory style, you'll increase the seakeeping abilities of the boat. The bow is the biggest determination in what she can handle. Big bows are bouyant.
    I like the flat bottom or near flat bottom for stability. I can rock all day long on the porch in a chair. I don't need a boat to rock me senseless.
    For example, the famed Simmons Sea Skiffs that were designed and originally built in Myrtle Grove NC by a cabinet maker. Hey Bobpaul!

    They used to run these 18 foot boats through the treacherous inlets of NC and well out into the ocean by oar and outboard back in the day commercial fishing or running nets with a low freeboard.
    The only way to get one now is to hire someone to build it for you or get crafty yourself.
    I'd like to build a 20 foot Simmons one day to just be able to say I have built one and own one. Not to mention the resale on them is darn good.
    I love Mahogany and so does the lumberyards. :sad:

    Over the last 10 years or so we have seen a big increase in new boat materials. Mainly in the cored hulls. Space age materials being used by manufacturers and home builders alike like Kevlar or foams.
    With the rising cost of fuel these types of hulls are looking better and better as they are lighter, easier on the tow vehicle, and easier on the wallet to operate.
    There are 25 foot Pangas built out of core materials that are capable of running well offshore with a 90-115 horse motor and plenty strong. Stronger then your all glass boats in many ways.

    There are alot of options out there and it boils down to one method I have used. A pencil and a piece of paper.
    Write down what you want in a boat, What is allowable where you fish, and the money you have available. Then commence to the dreaded compromise.
    All boats are a compromise in some way.

    Have fun with the process. :D
     
  7. thunderchicken

    thunderchicken New Member

    Messages:
    769
    State:
    Yuma Az
    I think it depends on where you might go. On very deep water lakes like Powell or Mead they often experience very windy conditions that can make the water pretty rough. At the very least that can make for a wet ride. If your boat handles waves and wind well then it might not be a concern. Personally a semi V or deep V works for me. If you are going to be mostly in smaller waters the your current works well. Wish you luck.
    P.S. Lake Havasu is a very good lake also.
    :cool:
     
  8. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    If you have ever fished in central or south America or southeast Asia you have probally fished from a Panga. These narrow hulls are usually 14 -38 feet long and are very seaworthy. They run 20 footers 60 miles offshore.
    They can take some bad sea conditions with experience behind the helm.
    This is an American version. The south American versions are home built with less eye pleasing roundness of course. They require smaller engines because the hulls are narrow but a good example of a low freeboard boat that takes to the open seas very well.

    Notice the deep entry but these boats have 6 degrees deadrise or less (nearly flatbottomed)
     

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  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    This is a site dedicated to the Simmons Sea Skiff and it's builders as this is a boat that has never been put into mass production. The most the designer/builder ever built was 1 a week and estimates are he built around a thousand of them the last he built in 1972 or 73. Today there are thousands of Simmons skiffs that have been built all over the world. If you live in North Carolina and have spent any time on the coast you have bound to have seen a few of these. A nice history is behind these boats and they are also very seaworthy and capable of holding their own with a closed transom design that incorporates a motorwell. These would make great catfish boats on virtually any body of water with low power requirements and can be configured with a side console or center console.


    Simmonsseaskiff.com


    Thumbing through a catalogue the other day I think I found the name for my boat... Knot Tonight
     
  10. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    To see one of these being built there are some links from that site or Wooden Boat magazine started a feature build in their October issue. Virtually a step by step of the building of one of these boats. Interesting reading if nothing else to see what goes into building a boat by this particular method.
     
  11. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Hoosier, I'm not sure if My two cents worth will help ya or not. I recently bought a lowe 2070VTC. its a big flatbottom center console 20' long and 96" across the beam. Its got a lot of wide open space front and rear casting decks. mine came with a 90hp merc 2-stroke, manual bilge pump, one areated livewell and one battery. I've added another battery, trolling motor, lowrance sonar,livewell timer, on-board battery charger,2nd battery tray, tie down cleats two pedestal seats and an minn kota powered anchor. I've got quite a bit tied up in it so far and not done yet. Love the boat but it has its bad points as well, not enough drystorage only two compartments, (plenty of room to add more though) and its not the dryest boat on rough water. other then that shes done me good.

    The lowe wasn't my first choice in a boat. a River Pro was, but cost kept me from getting it. river pro is a super tough merc sportjet driven boat that will take about anything you can dish out. if river fishing is gonna be your main thing a river pro would be ideal but for lakes and such the sportjet doesn't keep up with the big bass rigs or ride nearly as nice.
     
  12. hoosier angler

    hoosier angler New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    Arizona
    I have been away for a few days. I just read most of them, good info Thanks JA
     
  13. Zonaman

    Zonaman New Member

    Messages:
    508
    State:
    Florida
    OK, I'll bite. My ideal boat is probably a bit off the beaten path. I've always wanted a little cuddy cabin. Something I could anchor anywhere and still have some shelter form the storm. This way I could ride out any summer monsoons in relative comfort. I'm looking for a 60's vintage Glasspar Seafair Sedan.
     

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  14. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Zonaman, I like the cuddies too but in the Novia Scotia style lobster boat form. This is another home built of course.
    22' feet in length, 100 horse outboard pushes her beyond 35 MPH.
    Another great design by Arch Davis.
     

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  15. Zonaman

    Zonaman New Member

    Messages:
    508
    State:
    Florida
    Very sexy! I'd have a bit trouble garaging anything over 20 feet though. Maybe I should move into a houseboat!
     
  16. three_rivers

    three_rivers New Member

    Messages:
    688
    State:
    Tupelo Ar
    As far as something to that nature i've seen a boat or two that if i were to purchase another one it would be. The crew boats for port workers and the corp of engineers. Tinted windows, air and heat, and enough room to put in a small bed and plenty of space across the rear for rods....
     
  17. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Oxford,Miss
    I wouildn't have any other boat but the one I have,it's just a little 14ft simiV Polarcraft.I've had it on the Miss.Tenn and Ark. rivers pluse a few small rivers and a few large lakes and it works just fine.I know it's a small boat but I'm disabled and can't walk around in a big open boat anyway.I can't walk boatramps but once I get it in the water I can do any thing I have to do from the frount driver's seat.
     
  18. AZrivercat

    AZrivercat New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    Arizona
    You'll want a canoe or Kayak for the Salt and the Verde. We call them rivers in Arizona, but back east they would probably refer to them as creeks (with exception of some serious spring floods).

    The Colorado R. is the one to put a boat in, and it doesnt require too much, just make sure you have enough motor, theres a pretty good current in areas. And theres heavy recreational traffic in areas certain times of the year.

    Most lakes are friendly to most boats, Powell though can be real real nasty, in general you can take out most bass boats, but In the main channel it can get BAD, but you can always duck into one of its trillion coves.

    Theres a bit of duck hunting, I'm pretty sure you can hunt from boat in Alamo Lake and in Topock Marsh.