What type of mulch do you use?

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by floundahman, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. floundahman

    floundahman New Member

    Messages:
    564
    State:
    North Caro
    I have used many different types of mulch in my garden in the past; newspaper (never again), grass, straw and landscaping paper. I was wondering what you all use to keep weeds down and moisture in.
     
  2. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Black plastic, then cover with anything you might like or just leave it alone.
     

  3. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    composted horse manue and sawdust,,,I live next to a stable,,, I get 1-2 loads a day,,, lol

    I'm gona try 5 foot wide black plastic with soaker hose underneath with melons this year,,, just want to see.
     
  4. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    peat moss and lawn mower clippings
     
  5. tyrupp

    tyrupp New Member

    Messages:
    306
    State:
    Ellis,Kans
    I use leaves saved from the year prior.
     
  6. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Never used any,must be why my garden goes to hell about august,grass takes it over.:wink: I have been thinking about trying something,anything to keep the weeding down. Seems like if ya miss just one day,you can't ever catch up
    I dont have many weeds,just the native grass thats a pain .
     
  7. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    I use horse manure that is about one year old.

    I started to say I use one year old horse manure, but I know some of you would want to know why I don't use it from horses older than one year.:wink:
     
  8. shadchucker

    shadchucker New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    indiana
    I have about 20 pines boarding my property, I will use the pine needles has mulch for the garden.
     
  9. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    I've used store-bought mulches, like cypress, etc. & I've used grass clippings. I've had good luck with both. I try to only use straight grass cuttings though; not when I've been mowing the weeds in the dog pen!
    I never would've thought about using a composted-type manure; I would think it would be too "hot". It doesn't burn up the plants?
     
  10. joesf

    joesf New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Bloomington IL
    I think that depends on the plants. Tomatoes are best mulched with black plastic put a soaker hose under it to water with out wetting foliage. Tomatoes like warm feet and dry leaves. Try this old companion trick, plant a plot with corn, pole beans and pumkins or squash or cucumber. The squash works as a mulch and the beans feed the corn nitrogen and the corn gives the beans something to climb.
     
  11. TJD

    TJD New Member

    Messages:
    258
    State:
    Missouri
    Because of mulch my hoe has almost retired. I love grass clippings. I pour them on deep and wide so they seal out the sun light. I agree, I don't use clippings that contain weed seed. I don't use clippings off a yard that has been sprayed with weed killer. I learned that lesson the hard way. I have used the ground up tree branches from the tree trimmering co. It is best used on crops like black berrys and straw berrys. Just broad cast some extra fertlize before you spread the wood chips. Wood chips mixed with the stuff from under the chicken roost make a great combination. I add a new deep layer each year.
     
  12. Tomatoman

    Tomatoman New Member

    Messages:
    75
    State:
    WV
    I always went with the lawn clippings, myself. They break down relatively quickly and add a nice slow supply of nitrogen throughout the season. The price is right also.
     
  13. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    My wife's cousin's husband owns a sawmill nearby. We can get a truckload of mulch very cheap. Usually I lay down newspapers first as extra anti-weed reinforcement (with no colored ink photos), only black and white print. Then scatter the mulch on top. Sometimes I use dried pine needles I can find in the woods for acid loving plants. For organic fertilizer, our neighbors down the hill have a large goat farm where I go shovel manure, that is some rich stuff.
     
  14. Tomatoman

    Tomatoman New Member

    Messages:
    75
    State:
    WV
    Those are all great methods, festus. That'll make a garden grow! I have chickens, so i compost a lot of manure, bedding, and feathers from them along with leaves, lawn clippings, and any other organic matter i can get my hands on. I add the compost to the soil and use it to make compost tea as well. All those nutrients and microbial life will do amazing things for plants.
     
  15. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I use Post for grass, it won't kill a broadleaf (my beans) . And 2-4D for broadleaf, it won't kill grass (corn).
    And of course good ol hands and knees plucking.

    So the corn rows I gotta pluck grass.
    Bean rows I gotta pluck weeds.

    Other then that a properly set up tractor or tiller.
     
  16. canebreaker

    canebreaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,311
    State:
    Southaven,MS
    Last season was the first year to try mulching the garden. I had 2 rows of tomatoes and a row of okra. I layed out a cover of newspaper and covered with leaf mulch. Another bed with okra was leaf mulch without the paper.
    For now I'm hauling in loads of cotton hulls and manure for wintering. Part of the garden is covered with greens. There are leaves as big as serving platters. All will be turned over when I'm ready to start planting.
    After I till the middles the second time this year, I'll start laying out the paper and leaves with soaker hose under it.
     
  17. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC

    Leaves and pine needles are really high in acid.
    Ever walked much in agricultural fields and noticed that close the tree line the corn or soybeans are thin and smaller?
    That is because the soil close to the treeline is more acidic because of the trees in the area.

    Depending on the soil the may not be a good thing.