what to use for chum?

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by dano40, Feb 23, 2009.

  1. dano40

    dano40 New Member

    Messages:
    122
    State:
    Spirit lake, Iowa
    What does everyone use for chum?
     
  2. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Some folks take a 5 gallon bucket, fill it 2/3 full of corn and top it off with water. Cover it loosely & let it set for several weeks for it to ferment.

    As for myself, I keep a small bucket of range cubes in the boat. The break down over several hours and bring in all sorts of baitfish, which brings in the cats to feed on them.
     

  3. willybob

    willybob New Member

    Messages:
    46
    State:
    Arkansas
    sour corn
     
  4. NJ CLAD

    NJ CLAD New Member

    Messages:
    196
    State:
    Arizona
    It seems that to most catmen, chum, and to some extent, bait must have a horrible odor to be effective. I don't like dealing with "stinky stuff". I believe any kind of grain will work, most people ferment it with yeast, beer, etc. Scientifically, the only by products to this are vinegar or alcohol. Either could be added to the grain without making a person gag. As for alcohol, I've found no use for it as chum, but for me, that is a different matter. As for vinegar, it may have some use as chum. I don't use it as a rule, but when I've added it to chum or bait it certainly does not hurt, and may help. I use cattle feed, corn, soy, range cubes, cotton seed cakes, chicken feed, what ever, but have never felt the need to ferment them. If I did I'd just pour vinegar on them and let it soak while on my way to the fishing hole. Other useful chum is ground fish (carp, drum, any kind of fish guts, etc) , I use what I do not consider edible after cleaning, blood, and ground liver. Again I feel there is no value to placing these in the sun or garage and letting them rot. I just use them fresh. Hope this helps!
     
  5. delbert bumbleshoot

    delbert bumbleshoot New Member

    Messages:
    677
    State:
    Overland Park,Kansas
    We spend most of the summer chumming and chasing after large numbers of channel cats. Soybeans will work the best by about a 2-1 margin.Milo works pretty good too.Corn is ok but you will catch more carp than cats.Save the corn for making shine.Range cubes are Ok but Ive never had much luck with them.They don't stink though.I don't have a grinder but I'd like to try the ground fish. A few chumming guidelines; It aint magic if you dump it where there arent any fish you won't catch any. Chum several potential spots and only stay at each one 15-20 minutes unless youre hammering them. Try using a small natural bait like worms or liver and let it free fall with no weight. Punch bait or dip bait will work but I'm catch and release so I dont like to use treble hooks or something they will easily swallow.If they do swallow it don't do surgery to get your hook back use bronze j hooks and they rust out.Warm water deal May to October where I'm at.as a general rule chum no deeper than 15 feet most lakes.
     
  6. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    I use chicken scratch soured. I have also used dry dog food. Works for me.
     
  7. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    ive used dog food,and i save all the blood from my livers and use it to,cats will pickup on all that blood in the water.
     
  8. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    sorry double post:embarassed:
     
  9. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    May try the soybeans this summer. We have been fermenting with yeast and beer using 5 gallon buckets. We have had some good luck with layering from bottom to top about a 2 inch layer of chops then about a 2 inch layer of wheat leaving about a 5 inch space at the top for swelling. The soured wheat seems to do the best. I'll try some wheat and soybean mix this summer. If fermenting just remember to leave room for swelling and cover loosely so the expanding gas can escape but no flies can get to it. If the flies get to it you will end up with maggots. Cover grain with water/beer/yeast mixture, after it soaks it up cover one more time then let it sit in the sun and cook. It's killer for baiting up channel cats.
     
  10. ateamfisherman

    ateamfisherman New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Texas
    Try some soured wheat let it soak for s couple weeks it will bring them it will smell works good. Thanks Sam Davis
     
  11. papabear108

    papabear108 New Member

    Messages:
    127
    State:
    North Carolina
    What is a range cube?:eek:oooh:
     
  12. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD

    Do catfish like maggots? Might draw them in even better? :roll_eyes:
     
  13. OldSalt

    OldSalt New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    Texas
    Cattle feed. Sells at any feed store in 50# bags.

    rick
     
  14. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    Fish love maggots but your neighbors not so much :eek:oooh::smile2:.
     
  15. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    Range cubes are a substitute cattle feed that is readily available at any feed store. Works O.K. for chumming in catfish as well, just takes a little longer for the fish to find them.
     
  16. NJ CLAD

    NJ CLAD New Member

    Messages:
    196
    State:
    Arizona
    The range cubes are cattle feed that are kinda shaped like a dog biscuit. They are easy to chum with because one can just pick them up and throw them around. They don't stink either.
     
  17. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    I use Sardine chum, It's bloody & oily @ the same time. One of our sponsors, Fish-ON, can get it for you.

    It's readily available here, since it's used in saltwater.