what stage is too high to fish Markland pool

Discussion in 'OHIO RIVERS TALK' started by Scott C., Nov 2, 2009.

  1. Scott C.

    Scott C. Member

    Messages:
    510
    State:
    NKY
    Just curious what everyone's preference is for leaving the boat at home because they think the water is too high to fish the Markland Pool.

    I'll start us off - when the river's above 33 feet I don't bother.
     
  2. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I would say that the height of the water isnt as important to me as the amount of drift and trash in the water. I have fished around 34' ( Cinci gauge) a few times and it was a little hairy......:eek:oooh: but I would generally say between 33-34 ft is a good number for those who have a low "pucker" factor or are not used to having a vessel on the big water to definately stay at home. When its that hight, i usually try to go with another boat/buddy system, makes me feel safer.

    Fished yesterday am at 31 ft and no problems at all except the really thick dangerous fog and the heavy drift in the water........ Still had a problem anchoring ( 15 # with a 3 lb chain) in a few spots but a few tries got us where we needed to be.

    Salmonid
     

  3. Flootie16

    Flootie16 New Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    State:
    Indiana
    It really depends on how badly I want to go out. In the late spring early summer months when the flats are on I will possibly get out there in around 38-40 feet and normally get in behind something to get me out of the current or fish right inside the mouth of the creek. Ive done real well for flatheads this way. But any other time I dont like to get out on the water once it hits 35. And a lot depends on whether the Army corp is holding the water and the current isnt all that strong of whether they are running the water. cuz if the river is at 38 and holding and they arent running the water through due to high water down below, then im out there. But there are times when the water is at 31 and its a pain to keep anchor. So that is a major factor. And also gota consider debris. small debris is ok. Big trees and houses make me nervous :big_smile:
     
  4. fishmonster13

    fishmonster13 New Member

    Messages:
    700
    State:
    cincinnati,ohio
    i've been out at 34ft when the water has just been cookin along makes it hard to anchor up but like flootie said you just get in behind something. i don't like the debri either lost the backet to the transducer sunday when i was out ,lucky it was the bracket and not the tranducer:big_smile:
     
  5. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Have caught alot of good fish when the river is at 40ft+, risk may out weigh the rewards, but to me very high and fast water is the easiest time to catch fish..
     
  6. catcrazed

    catcrazed New Member

    Messages:
    575
    State:
    ohio
    Im with this ole boy!! I fully trust my boat
    for one and for 2 the fish are a lot is more predictable when the water is high. I also have caught tons of fish when the water is up and screaming. The day we went on our first guided trip the water was at approx. 37 feet and we smoked em.
     
  7. Scott C.

    Scott C. Member

    Messages:
    510
    State:
    NKY
    I'm not a high water fan - maybe I'll have to rethink my strategy.

    I have a safe boat. To me the issue always seems to be in the presentation. Aside from keeping floating trees off your lines that can quickly spool you I find the small particles of what looks like grass acumulates on my line when anchored. I can shake it off a little better with mono but braid is like a magnet for that stuff.

    Anyone care to share their successful presentation methods when the water is smoking (aside from hiding behind a barge/bridge/etc)?

    I'm sure you're somewhat limited on where you can actually fish based on the debris slick. I'm guessing inside bends with a good channel break or the mouths of larger creeks is a good place to start...
     
  8. JBrooks

    JBrooks New Member

    Messages:
    742
    State:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Where there's water, I'm fishin'. :smile2:
     
  9. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    In my experience, which isn't a ton mind you only had my boat for about a year and a half......But it always seems to me that high and fast water, and I mean 35ft+, the fish will usually pack up along the banks. Not just inside bends, because usually on both sides of the river, there are already hundreds of different pockets, points, and current breaks. Seems like the seams of fast and slower water can always be found on both sides. 20ft off the bank you can be sitting in water thats slow enough that 3oz of lead will keep the baits down, move out 10 more ft and you'll need 8oz or more..In my experience, for some reason alot of good fish tend to move out of the really fast water. Could be because the shad tend to move into that slower water. I have literally sat 10ft off the bank in times like this and crushed blue cats. But it seems like the water has to be extremly fast for me to target fish in those areas. This weekend for example, the river was only up around 4 ft, even though there was some pretty good current, it didnt seem to be enough to force those fish along the banks like it sometimes will do, atleast not any spots I hit..:smile2:...To me the fish become very predictable when the river is up and really crankin. That being said I have caught fish out it the heavy current too. It seems like the Ohio River fishes very different than some of the bigger rivers like the Mississippi river, or other rivers like the Missouri that always have rediculous current. I have seen those guys using 20+oz of lead, and hammering blues, where is in my experience on the Ohio, it's very rare that I have caught alot of big blues in fast current, unless there were holding behind some sort of structure. Regardless, if you haven't had much success when fishing the high water, or don't think that its worth it, it really is a good time to locate some nice fish rather easily. Thats why I enjoy winter time fishing so much, more often than not the river is up 10ft or more, thats when these fish can be taken on a regular basis, and with alot less effort. More often than not, if you can find those pockets of slower water, all of the leaves, grass, and other garbage will stay off your lines. I have never caught any good fish when I am pulling in 10lbs of garbage every time I change the bait.