What Sinker?

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by Katmandeux, May 21, 2008.

  1. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    When bank fishing on the river, I have yet to find a sinker that will "stick", when fishing cross-current.

    No-rolls and pyramids up to 5 ounces just tumble downstream like there was no sinker at all. The bottom is sand/mud, and the depth is less than 10'.

    Is more weight the answer, or is there a better sinker design I need to try?

    Thoughts?
     
  2. philosopher

    philosopher New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Oklahoma

  3. CoonX

    CoonX Member

    Messages:
    737
    State:
    Oklahoma City O
    Spider weights
    Sputniks
     

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  4. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY

    Those will work but I use 6-8oz and up No-Roll Slips and No- Roll Bank Sinkers on the Ohio River and they work well. Good advice so far, wish you the best of luck!!!
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Some kind of 'spider' type weight should work. Somewhere, I've got a mold designed to mold lead around the center of a treble hook. (I found it in the shop after I bought my house.) I see no reason why putting some coathanger wire in place of the treble hook wouldn't work. If I had to make some sinkers like that and didn't have a mold, I'd get me a piece of scrap pipe that, filled with lead, would provide whatever weight I wanted the sinker to have. Take two pieces of coathanger wire and fold each in half, and insert them into the pipe so that the folded end sticks out an inch or so; this will be the top end. The wire should stick out of the other end of the pipe at least 3". Fold the 4 ends back up against the pipe; try to get them equally far apart as possible. Stick the bottom end into a bed of DRY sand to create a plug, and fill the pipe with melted lead. When cool, you can rebend the wire into a 'treble hook' or 'grapple' shape. This should hold the bottom, and when you need to reel in, the wire should straighten out most of the time.
     
  6. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Man thats a tough one you have there. I don't think it's possible really to throw a line out and have it stick right where you want it. That cross current pulls your sinker because of your fishing line thats catching all of that current. I would say that if you fish current and it takes 8oz lead to hold bottom from behind the boat. Well then your probably going to have to step up to 20oz sinkers for bank fishing.
     
  7. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY


    The surf fishermen up here in Joisy use them and swear by em.
     
  8. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Don't I know it!

    I've seen something like Will posted, made up on a bank sinker...they use them in riprapped tailraces on the Arkansas. I never thought about using them on a softer bottom, but maybe they will do the trick.

    I'd like to be able to make my own, but haven't been able to find a mold...Jerry's suggestion may get a try.
     
  9. CoonX

    CoonX Member

    Messages:
    737
    State:
    Oklahoma City O
    Dave, get ahold of Lawrence(Awshucks), he has a mold for those weights.
    Should be able to pour a few at Keystone.
     
  10. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I'll be bringing the molds... you need to supply the lead. LOL
     
  11. Cmartin4538

    Cmartin4538 New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    pennsylvania
    yea i think you should go with more wait because i fish the mon river and after it rains the currents are real strong i usually use an 8-9 oz sinker to keep my bait on the bottom.:cool2:
     
  12. Pacman

    Pacman New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    South Carolina
    If you can reduce the diameter of your line, the current will have less to push on. Power pro braid has an extremely small diameter for the strength. (100 lb test only has a 20 lb diameter as compared to mono.)
     
  13. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    the pyramid sinkers work good in soft soil from the bank. the flat side digs into the mud as current pulls it downstream. I would'nt run your line through the fine wire eyelet though. attach a drop leader to it and use a barrel swivel on your mainline....
     
  14. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    We have a winner.

    Yesterday I made a little road trip to a tackle shop near L&D16 on the Arkansas, and picked up some 5oz bank sinkers that have "spider" wires molded into them.

    I just got in from trying them out, and here's the deal: they stick. Like glue.:big_smile:
     
  15. mrmarkedwards

    mrmarkedwards Active Member

    Messages:
    919
    State:
    Delaware
    The key to fishing fast water from the bank is to keep your bait in a fixed position. This can be achieved by locating a pocket of slack water or by anchoring your bait in heavy current. Either way downsizing your rig and bait are a good idea or small diameter line should be used if conditions allow. In order to do this I use a tactic that is popular with European sea anglers called uptiding this tactic is simple most of us myself included cast our bait out and once the sinker hits the water we begin to reel in the slack line the result is the line comes tight and the current begins to push on the line and in no time your rig is tumbling downstream. With uptiding, cast upstream at a 45-degree angle then once the sinker hits the water leave the bail open (if you’re using a spinning reel) and wait until you feel the sinker hit bottom. Next flip the bail and wait a minute or so what will happen is the force of the current will turn the sinker and hold it in place. The amount of slack line can vary but, anywhere from 10-100 yards. Rods have to be held almost vertical in order to keep as much line as possible off the water. The rod springing back as a fish picks up the bait, dislodges the sinker, and causes slack line usually indicates bites. Often the hooks itself, but reeling up the slack and setting it again can increase your hookup percentage as would circle hooks. Braided line can be useful if the bottom is fairly snag free. Using braided lines in this situation also is a benefit every advantage should be taken to minimize water pressure. Thinner line means less line needs to be fed for the loop, which results in better bite detection and more hookups. If the sinker continues to bump down current try different sinkers the picture at the bottom shows my progression. The last sinker is called a grip sinker and it can hold bottom when a sinker almost twice its weight can’t.
    So remember smaller baits, thinner line and possibly the only good time to have a belly can help you fish a fast current. Good luck.
     

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