what lbs. thrust for a trolling motor

Discussion in 'Boating' started by bigfish08, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. bigfish08

    bigfish08 New Member

    Messages:
    375
    State:
    ohio
    in the next couple weeks i am looking to buy a 12 or 14 foot john boat, what would you say the minimum amount of thrust for a trolling motor going up streams and rivers.
     
  2. whisker maniac

    whisker maniac New Member

    Messages:
    2,712
    State:
    arkansas
    Is the trolling motor going to be the only power you are gonna have or will you have a gas motor also. If the trolling motor is all the power you will have you will need to get the biggest you can. But the only problem with that is that it will eat up your battery at full throttle in about an hour. If you will have a gas powered motor also you will be able to get by with less power cause you will have the gas motor when ya really need it but the trolling motor will still need to be pretty strong to fight the current.
     

  3. FourWinds

    FourWinds New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lawton, Oklahoma
    I've been looking to buy a 12-14' maybe a 16' jon boat soon myself. I was thinking of a small outboard about 5hp or so and a 30-35 lb thrust trolling motor w/2 batteries. I haven't got my mind made up yet but I think it'll work for me (local lakes)
     
  4. bigBB

    bigBB Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    St.Louis, MO
    it of course depends on the conditions your fishing and as stated if it is your only power. i had a 12' jon with a 40lb thrust and it did great in small lakes etc... if you are in a river with much current i'm not sure you would make much head way with that.. but i'm not exactly sure since i never took that boat in a river..
     
  5. Spills

    Spills New Member

    Messages:
    61
    State:
    Missouri
    If you're looking to do much river fishing I would recommend a minimum of 45lbs or more for that size boat. Of course if the river is up and the current is moving I wouldn't go on that alone.
     
  6. FourWinds

    FourWinds New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lawton, Oklahoma
    I agree... if I were going to take it out on a river I would want a lot more thrust and I'd also want more power than a 5 hp.
     
  7. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    If you are taking two batteries you can use a bigger trolling motor. Ask your self this question. If a storm was brewing and you needed to get to safety quick, what size trolling motor would you like on that boat. A minimum of 55 -65# trust. If you are using a 14'-16' boat consider getting at least a 9.9hp motor. Good luck on your search.
     
  8. FourWinds

    FourWinds New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lawton, Oklahoma
    Thanks for your post, Mickey, and you do make some excellent points. I've been out on the lake when many a storm came up!

    However, regardless of the number of batteries (i.e. 1 or 2) , the more the thrust - the more the current draw - the quicker those batteries are discharged/depleted.

    Having to get off the lake quickly probably has more to do with nautical speed than anything else. A person might realize more nautical speed with an 5hp outboard than with a 65lb thrust trolling motor, I don't know.

    I did say a 5hp or so. The un-funny thing about that is the price. Considering a 9.9hp as a minimum is fine and good for practical purposes, and even specification purposes, but it's going to cost more than a 5hp motor. Additionally, a 55-65# trolling motor is considerably more costly than a 30-35#.

    However, being the poor-boy that I am... both of those more powerful options may be beyond the considerations of my bank account.

    In this area, like many others, storms can come up pretty quickly. But this is the plains and you can see for a hundred miles (so-to-speak). And unless one just pops up right on top of you, if you don't see it coming then it's because you're not watching what's going on around you.

    Regardless, I'm going to get the best compromise of price vs. performance... or performance vs. price... or whatever my bank account will allow... or whatever best describes it! :)
     
  9. Don Wessling

    Don Wessling New Member

    Messages:
    316
    State:
    IL.
    Another factor to consider is the width of the boat and the condition of the bottom skin that contacts the water. The more square feet of skin, the more drag. A beat up or dirty skin will also create drag. White wall tire cleaner in a spary bottle at a car wash will help keep it clean. The less power you have, the more area that contacts the water. Have you ever noticed how a power boat picks up speed when it comes up on plane? Less contact area = less drag.
     
  10. FourWinds

    FourWinds New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lawton, Oklahoma
    I'm leaning toward a brand-new boat. Excellent point about the contact pad though.
     
  11. Wabash River Bear

    Wabash River Bear New Member

    Messages:
    3,019
    State:
    Indiana
    O.k. guys, here's what I know. I have a newer Lowe 1652, when it was a bare boat with me and the wife and our gear, and a MinnKota Endura 40'# transom mount, it stuggled in a fair breeze. I have since then upgraded to a MinnKota Edge 55'# bow mount.
    Go as big as you can afford to. someday you'll be glad you did.
     
  12. FourWinds

    FourWinds New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lawton, Oklahoma
    I thought about this last night after I got off of here. And like Mickey suggested about bigger motors, I've been leaning that way even if it means having to wait a few months longer. I think I'll be a LOT happier in the end with something like 10-15 hp outboard and 50-65# troller.

    Come to think of it though, the government sends me a $600 check to help stimulate the economy, I'll sure do my part with it.

    Hmmm might even just talk to the banker, not that I need anymore bills.

    Thanks guys!
     
  13. baptistpreach

    baptistpreach New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Oklahoma!
    Its much better to wait a few months and save the money to get what you need, then get on the water and be frustrated by your equipment that can't perform. (Just ask the guy whos trolling motor couldn't move his boat in the Oklahoma wind:eek:oooh:. VERY FRUSTRATING!!:sad2:
     
  14. catchase

    catchase New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    I have a 16 ft river john which is a flat bottom and pretty wide. i used to have a 35# thrust on it and it worked fine in small lakes and ponds but i went up to an endura 55# and love it. on the lakes i fish that won't allow a gas motor i can still get across fairly quick to where i want to be. i also have a 25HP for when and where i can use it. go big, even if you have a 55 or 60 you won't be a full thottle all of the time unless you are moving a great distance. i didn't notice a big difference in battery drain. they still last all night. Just my 2 cents.
     
  15. tkoehler

    tkoehler New Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    Nebraska
    Transom mount trolling motors have become very reasonable. I wouldnt go any smaller than a 40 # thrust !
     
  16. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    I have to agree you want a bigger one-I had a 34th minkota trans mount -sold it and bought the 43th motorguide foot control and there is alot of difference now,I dont use my trolling motor for much other then bait so it is on the sippi-If you are gonna have a motor foot controlled is the way to go if you can! Bigger is better!
     
  17. JAYNC

    JAYNC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,312
    State:
    Newport N.C.
    I have a 17' aluminum, hull weight 900lbs, engine 400lbs gear, people sometimes can be over 2000lbs. I bought the boat with a 55lb minn kota all terrain and it does a good job in slack water with medium to heavy winds but if you want to go up river forget it. I should have bought a 90-100lb trolling motor. Depends on the weight of the boat your using to determine the trolling motor you need. If you have an outboard on the back of your boat then get a bow mount if your boat supports it and trim the engine up when using the trolling motor. Battery is the next step, DONT get a cheap battery. I run Marine Master 27 series batteries and I can fish for bream all day and still have power left. Dont get a cheap charger, get a good onboard charger like a Dual Pro. One of the biggest battery killers of them all are crappy chargers, and people who dont keep their batteries topped off. My batteries are going on three years of heavy use and still going strong. Put di-electric grease on all your connections, and buy a nice in-line auto reset circuit breaker. Make sure your wires to the trolling motor are the proper gauge, I have 6 gauge in my boat. All wires are not created equal either, get a good ones such as Ancor. They are expensive but they are also the best. In my opinion boats are like airplanes. Take no chances with your equipment, do it right the first time and she'll get you back to the ramp every time.
     
  18. mariofish

    mariofish New Member

    Messages:
    914
    State:
    wv
    try 40lb trolling motor works good:big_smile:
     
  19. mariofish

    mariofish New Member

    Messages:
    914
    State:
    wv
    nice truck catfish kenny:wink:
     
  20. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    I used to have a 14' flat bottom, V front with a 6hp Johnson & a 65 lb. Minn Kota trans mount. Worked well in both lake & small rivers. I also used it on the Mississippi occasionally but don't recommend it.