What is the best way to weight a jug line

Discussion in 'Homemade baits' started by TX Fisherman, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    I havent run juglines very often because i cant figure out how to weight them so a good sized catfish wont drag them very var. the few times i have run them they have gone off somewhere in the lake, (different lakes) these lines werent weighted with more then 4 ounce weights. then someone told me why i was losing them because when the catfish get hooked up, they can move those jugs really fast. does anyone know how to prevent this, without tying the juge line to a dam, or concrete pier, etc...
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I have made concrete weights of various sizes... some are about 1/2 lb, some are a pound, some two pounds. If a dink gets on the two pound weight, it don't move it... If a 20 pounder gets on it, I just hope it don't go to deeper water. Don't know what the answer is myself, unless we use a crankcase on each jug. LOL
     

  3. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    i use bricks, they seem to be hard to drag across the bottom or something. Also, if u use bigger jugs they are harder to pull as far.
     
  4. sw2324

    sw2324 New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    Texas
    How often are you running the jugs? I jug at Texoma with 1 gallon jugs and tie two railroad spikes on the end of the line. We run them 3 times a day and have great success. You can walk the local tracks and pick up old spikes all over the place where they have been replaced and thrown on the ground.
     
  5. Wally

    Wally New Member

    Messages:
    857
    State:
    FLORIDA
    We use 2# lead weight and a Gallon Clorox Bottle. The only time we ever lost any at Texoma is when we put them too close to the river channel and a storm came through!!
    Old window weights would work fine also, if ya can find some old windows that someone don't need !!
     
  6. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    i run them morning and night, but if i get to devote a full weekend to them(not very often) i'll run them every 4-6 hrs
     
  7. CatHound

    CatHound New Member

    Messages:
    164
    State:
    Missouri
    Here's something you can try. I know this works.

    1. Take a half gallon(or gallon if you think you need it) plastic milk or clorox jugs - the ones with handles.
    2. Poke a couple of small(tiny) holes in the bottoms and along the sides of each jug. This is to let any air escape when the jug is submerged.
    3. Fill with sand, pea gravel or cement(quickrete) (you have to be patient filling it with cement). They should weight several pounds each.
    4. Tie one of the filled bottles to the bottom of each end of your set line.
    5. For floats, use 1 gallon clorox bottles. Again tie them off by the handles.

    (You can also use an onion sack or gunny sack full of rocks for the anchors - but they tend to be a one time thing and then you have to replace them. They also tend to get hung up on the bottom more often)

    The combined weight of these anchors and the flotation of the floating clorox bottles will make it very difficult for even large catfish to drag very far at all. Of course, I have never tried this and caught a 100 pounder before so I could not vouch for how it would stand up against one of those.

    If you can set up near any shore or bank, run a line from the nearest floating clorox bottle handle to a large rock or tree branch and tie it off there.
     
  8. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    my uncle runs 1 gal jugs and bricks same as i do, furthest we have seen big cat drag one of these is about 200 yrds. Just put reflective tape on them and look for them with spot light, then distance doesnt become a problem.

    A big turtle will drag them further than the fish though, weve had turtles drag them up on bank and then some!!!
     
  9. savage308

    savage308 New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Victoria, Texas
    I made my weights out of 1" rebar or round stock. Then I welded a chain link on the top of it so I could tie my main line onto it. Mine are about 10" long and they weigh approx. 2lbs. I keep them with my jugs in a milk crate so everything is there together. In my opinion you need 2lbs of weight to keep the jugs in the area you put them. If you don't have access to a welder you can go to any machine shop and buy the round stock and they will weld the chain eye on there relatively cheap. Construction sites or companys may also have the rebar there you can get for free.

    Good luck.
     
  10. Lab Man

    Lab Man New Member

    Messages:
    6
    State:
    Texas
    I have had the best luck with flat weights. They wont roll on the bottom and fish cant drag them as far. A Bleach bottle cut off so there is only about 5" left , fill with concrete and while concrete is wet put a wire with a loop in it down in the concrete. It also helps to bend the wire at 90 degrees when you put it in concrete. After the concrete dries you can heat the plastic (if you left a small lip) and roll it inside so it wont come off and now the weight wont scratch your boat when you pull em up and they bang the side.
     
  11. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    thanks for the suggestions i will try them probably on lake richland chambers considering we go there most often. -thank you
     
  12. bigcatmaniac

    bigcatmaniac New Member

    Messages:
    459
    State:
    California Miss
    I have learned that approximately 2lbs of weight will hold a 35lb blue in one spot using a 2liter soda bottle in moderate to fast current.
     
  13. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    First of all, unless you're absolutely sure that you have a weight so heavy a big cat can't possible move it, don't use a weight over 1/2 the floatation capacity of the jug; otherwise, there's a possiblity that a cat will drag it to deep water where the jug will sink out of sight forever. A rough rule of thumb is that a gallon jug has 8# of displacement, which means approximately 4# of displacement for a 2-liter jug. I use 2# cannonball sinkers for my 2-liter jugs, since I have a mold for them. Mostly, though, I prefer to use freefloating jugs; I just seem to have much better luck with them.
     
  14. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    glad to see ya posting Jerry. Been missing your wise tidbits of information!
     
  15. catman849

    catman849 New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Alabama
    Definetly go with some bigger jugs, thats where your gonna get resistance on the fish. The best catfisherman I know taught me to use pool noodles cut into about 1 1/2ft sections. Even the big boys cant keep them down too long.
     
  16. toddrod

    toddrod New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    Vacherie,LA
    I use tire weights cast into 1 pound ingots in a Lyman mold I found at a gun show. I drill a hoe in it and loop a plastic quick tie through it and attach to jug line.
     
  17. jetdocx

    jetdocx New Member

    Messages:
    105
    State:
    Corinth Tx
    I use a 20oz plastic bottle. Saved all my mountian dew bottles for a while. Cut the tops off and filled with concrete. Made a loop out of a piece of coat hanger. Works great, plus the plastic bottle helps not to mark up your boat when it bumps up against it when you pulling them back into the boat.
     
  18. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    Jerry makes a great point here that you always need to figure the bouyancy your jug will handle unless your anchoring with a 20 pound cinder block.:lol: I've used 2.5 pound weights to anchor a jugline in a certain place only to find it a mile away from where I orginally set the jug. A 10 pound fish can still move a 2 to 5 pound weight quite a distance. Now if that fish can drag it to deeper water and theirs not enough bouyancy you'll never see your jug again. The only way to keep a jug from moving at all would be to place enough weight where it's basically a weighted vertical trotline....like a 20 plus pound concrete block where there's no way it can be moved. You might as well just set a trotline and keep it hidden where it won't be ran.

    Anchored juglines are really not to keep the fish from moving the jug.There are most useful when trying to fish a specific area that you believes holds fish without drifting away until a fish finds your bait. I use anchored jugs if I'm trying to catch larger fish and specifically a flathead that doesn't chase after free floating jugs.
     
  19. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Good point about using anchored jugs for flatheads. While I have started using some anchored jugs, I've mostly used freefloating jugs over the past 20+ years, and I have yet to catch a flatheac over 2# on a freefloating jug. Now, I've caught several on freefloating jugs that got hung up in the rocks and weren't freefloating anymore, but not while the jugs were floating with the current.