What is the best beginner/cheapest kayak?

Discussion in 'Kayaker and Canoe Fishing' started by will21190, Nov 17, 2007.

  1. will21190

    will21190 New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    Kentucky
    .........thanks
     
  2. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    The cheapest is almost never the best. Search the internet under "kayaks'' and "kayak fishing" you will find all the info you need. Also test paddle different kinds. Lots of questions you have to answer for your self. Do you want a sit on top or a sit inside? Are you gonna use it in surf, fast water or big slowrunning water? Are you gonna fish from it? How big are you? All these are very important is selecting the right yak. Do lots of research, it will save you money and help you find the right yak for you. Also remember to use this forum again if you need more help...
     

  3. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    Welcome to the BOC, William!

    For a great deal on a kayak, check this one out right here on the BOC site:
    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/pp-classifieds/showproduct.php?product=208.

    If you prefer new, Google "kayak fishing stuff" and see what companies appear. There is a good company out there that is offering outstanding deals right now on Heritage kayaks.

    Heritage and Native Watersports are considered my favorite because they are designed by fishermen for fishermen, and they are great value for the money. This is not a bias, nor arrogance, just simply good sense! :wink:
     
  4. sherlockian

    sherlockian New Member

    Messages:
    50
    State:
    Alabama
    I have been kayaking for almost 20 years, which was primarily whitewater and touring. I just recently got into kayak fishing(8months) and have found alot of difference in fishing kayaks vs. all others. I do not like sit on top models, so I decided to get a cheaper short kayak to dedicate to fishing.
    I got a Victory Blast from Dicks Sporting Goods for $229 and outfitted it with the essentials(rod holders flush and bow mount, anchor, dry storage, paddle holder, etc.) for around $60. This yak is small enough to easily transport, yet still move through the water well. The Victorys are made from older/discontinued Percerption molds. This yak is great for someone that is not sure if they will stick with it. Since I started fishing from this yak, my little boat rarely gets taken out.
     
  5. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    I can understand why it doesn't get taken out.. That ain't a fishing kayak.
    A fishing kayak ( sit on top is the only way to go ) has to have enough secondary stability to allow you to fish side saddle when you get a real fish hooked, has enough room to hold 4 rods, a tackle box, a cooler for food and drinks, a live well with aireator for live bait, room for a fish bag that can take at least 40 pounds of fish and 15/20 pounds of ice. 12 volt battery to run the fish finder, bait pump and GPS.And a cast net if you wanna catch your own bait on the fly.. That doesn't include maps, lip grippers, nets, anchors. stake out poles, life jacket. Mine is 13 feet 9 inches long and can carry 600 pounds total weight. OH, and by the way, my son who is younger than I (DUH) can stand in it an throw a cast net..All this for a yak that costs under a thousand dollars, burns NO gas and is not required to be licensed or registered. Oh yeah, I could pull a 9 footer as a dingy if I wanted... But I don;t !!
     
  6. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    Welocme to the BOC, Gregory!

    I would say "Whatever floats your boat..." :wink:

    It would be interesting to know why you are opposed to SOTs. As Jerry points out, SOTs provide some definite angling advantages, unless you are running rapids between the pools!

    Most angling SIKers that I know were kayakers before they decided to do some fishing.

    On the other hand, I am considering building a strip wood kayak, which will certainly be a SIK!
     
  7. sherlockian

    sherlockian New Member

    Messages:
    50
    State:
    Alabama
    Jerry, I do not understand what you are getting at. By saying my little boat, I was referring to my 14ft aluminum v-hull with outboard. My little yak can be transported on my car roof to anywhere I wish to fish. Yes, I am limited to the gear I can take, but I have always been a minimalist. Why haul 3 tackle boxes when only about 10 of your lures catch fish? Why take 10 rods when you are usually using only 2?

    Joel, I am not opposed to SOTs. I actually have used them in saltwater. A SIK is what I learned to yak in, and is more comfortable for me. I feel I am lower to the water, which increases MY stability. And yes some of the waters I yak and fish have a little whitewater(primarily the Locust Fork of the Black Warrior in Alabama).
     
  8. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    OK, You are right, I misunderstood what you meant by little boat. Sorry...
    And I probably could get by with less tackle(Please don't tell my wife).
    But on most of my yak fishing trips I often start the morning fishing for redfish, flounder and seatrout in the flats in water from 1 to 3 feet deep using light to medium spinning tackle. then later in the day move to deeper water(up to 60 feet) for drum, sheephead, sharks and once in a while grouper and snapper. That takes heavy rod and reels. So 4 outfits are just about minimum and the cast net and baitwell is needed for live bait. As an un-willing member of the upside down fishing club I know for a fact that SOTs are much, much easier to reboard in deep water, and they can be made unsinkable by simply putting 6 or 8 pool noodles inside. Hey, different strokes for different folks, thats why they make more than one brand truck !!!
     
  9. gbigskin

    gbigskin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    State:
    oklahoma
    william, since you live in ky. not florida, i doubt you will be fishing for redfish or shark so to you question. i have a $229.00 10' pelican which comes with a paddle. this is a sit in model. i put a rod holder on the front. added some rubber cord to the front so i could secure gear. equipped a milk carton with pvc for rocket launchers and added cleets to tie off line and have found this more than adequate to fish the arkansas river, feeder creeks, and lakes. i have limblined, jugged, and fished with rod and reel with this rig and it works great. i thow a small cast net from it also. the one thing you will get with some other more expensive models is better tracking when the yak is in a glide. this is not a big issue with me as i am not covering long distances at a time. when i chose this yak it was to see if i would like yak fishing before spending a buch of money on something i wouldn't use. i love fishing from it but since i got it rigged the way i do and have fished from it as much as i have i have not found a reason to 'upgrade'. it meets all my needs for inland fishing. best of luck.
     
  10. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I would recommend looking around your area for a place that rents them for a day. When I lived in Va, we used to go to a place up in the Blue Ridge Mountains and rent kayaks for a day, they would haul you as far up the river as you wanted to go, drop you off, and you float back to where you started. We would pack a lunch and fish all day for smallies, stop and swim, play frisbee, etc...GOOD TIMES!

    Anyway, back to the point, if you can rent one for a day or two, you can get a feel for what you like and don't like, and look for those things in one you plan to purchase. Or, you may decide you don't like the kayak way of fishing at all, and save yourself the grief of purchasing one all together.