What Grass can grow in sandy soil? Is it just DOOM?

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by Catfish_Commando, Apr 22, 2006.

  1. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Is there a type of grass that will take root in Sand environments? What options are available other than maybe just sod replants, and even if you did this, would it be a waste of time?

    Thinking just a dump-truck of gravel :)
     
  2. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Paul, have you tried st.augustine, it grows in sandy soil very well.
     

  3. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    JW,

    I sure haven't, I will have to give it a whirl. I looked at 1 acre with a double-wide mobile home on it, but the acre is basically sand. Some trees have taken root, but the terrain looks about as sad as it can be :sad:

    Thanks for the advice!
     
  4. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    With Joisey bein notorious for sandy soil I have found that Zoysa (SPELLIN) has taken root very well at my place and will spread like a cheap hooker. LOL!
     
  5. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    LOL!

    To funny to pull!
     
  6. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    CC JW hit it right on the head. There are other types that will grow in sand some can get costly while others are not good grass for lawns. Over all St.A. is your best bet,as long as it get's sun & water. If you need any tips on installion or care let me know.
     
  7. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Swampy,

    Thanks! I like this property because it is cheap enough for me to afford, and if the grass issue is fixed, its a win win!

    I may be calling :waaaht:
     
  8. dixiedrifter

    dixiedrifter New Member

    Messages:
    102
    State:
    Tennessee
    St. Augustine would probably work...

    I'm surprised nobody mentioned bermuda...
     
  9. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    I've been in landscape in one way or another for over 20 years,I'd never plant that stuff. LOL I've sprayed the hell out of it many times before.
     
  10. squirtspop

    squirtspop New Member

    Messages:
    968
    State:
    Glencoe, Arkansas
    Bermuda will do quite well. Spreads like wild fire, heat and pretty much drought resistant. Makes a nice carpet of a lawn. Pretty much the only thing is it does get rampant by spreading where you don't want it to go. I spray it with round up or pull it and transplant it in another bare spot. It is the first grass to turn brown in the summer and the last to green up in the spring but I like it anyhow.
     
  11. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I'd say Centipede or St. Augustines but not without work.
    I have both grasses and got full coverage by sprigging and in certain spots putting down a patch.

    Sprig and patch in the fall. Even though it is dormant in the winter it gives the root system time to root in for the spring jump.

    Which do I like better?
    St. Augustine because it can take traffic better then Centipede.
    Driving across a Centipede yard in the winter will leave stripes in the spring in most cases.

    The old sayig about Centipede would really apply to both grasses.
    The first year it sleeps.
    The second year it creeps.
    The third year it leaps.
     
  12. kspor

    kspor New Member

    Messages:
    716
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I have raised 6000 head of cattle on grass grown in sandhills. It takes a lot of water. I would suggest incorporating some orgainic matter into your area. Another option is to use crystals that hold water and till them into the top 1" of your soil. Then plant your grass. You will always have to use more water and fert as the sand doesnt hold either well. I grew up in sandhill and its just a matter or water.

    I planted a water saver fescue. It looks a lot like blue grass but needs less water. Young grass takes a bit to establish deep roots. You will need to keep it really damp until germination. Once it germinates keep watering it but allow the soil to dry a bit on top. Maybe once a day. After you mow it the first time go to every other day. After the third mowing go to every third day. Now if there is a strong wind or the grass pales increase the water.

    You may have other problems as well. PH and nutrients may be off. Go to your local extension and get a soil sample kit. It cost around 17-25 dollars and can let you know what is your current status. Now that is a snapshot in time, but it can highlight glaring problems.

    I have worked in the turf industry for years and planted many yards. I just renovated my entire front yard and was mowing it three weeks after planting. I will never recommend tilling unless your lawn is severly unlevel. Tillers are a waste of time and money for most planting.

    Grass seed needs to be planted 1/8-1/4" deep. A verticutter is best for this. I use it in three directions and then broadcast seed and starter. Water 2-3 times a day and there should be no problem.

    If the PH is off grass may germinate grow and then just die. You can get a PH test kit for soil at most garden centers for undr 5 bucks.

    Good luck.
     
  13. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Centipede loves sorry land. The sorrier the soil the better.
    Worst thing you can do is fertilize it unless you go with something like a 4-4-26. Sweet tater fertilizer.
     
  14. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    JW is correct but you will need to keep it alive, unlike many other grass it can die. Most grass that dies comes back but not all.
     
  15. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    Paul, contact your local county agricultural extension office. They can tell you what types and variety of grass will work in your area. The extension office will also be able to tell you how, who,what, and when to get the grass going. Should be able to find them under county government.
     
  16. Rat

    Rat New Member

    Messages:
    236
    State:
    Forrest Illinoi
    Astroturf...........stays green all year around, never needs mowed, weed resistant, stands up well to traffic and you can take it with you if you move.;)
    Rat
     
  17. Hootowlc3

    Hootowlc3 New Member

    Messages:
    409
    State:
    Florida
    Paul be sure to check if it needs lime. Here in Florida I have to lime my sand 2 times a year.
     
  18. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    State:
    TN

    I'm with Rat, plus you won't have to mow and save GAS! In the long run you would save money and labor. Just a woman's opinion who has to mow a billy goat hill in the back. :rolleyes:
     
  19. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Bermuda Grass
    Johnson Grass
    Crab Grass
    Fescue

    All grasses that thrive in Oklahoma. Sometimes I feel like my backyard is 3/4 sand, 1/4 dust. Weve got the top 3 in our yard in various spots. Haven't been here long enough for me to get it one type all the way through.
     
  20. pursuing_cats

    pursuing_cats New Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Clarksville,Tennessee
    I agree with Squirtspop. I grew up in Augusta, Ga and I remember the days when my Dad planted Bermuda. He also planted Centipede and Man those two grew like a wildfire and I was always the one who had to pull it up and relocate it to other parts of the yard. It is a durable grass and will last forever if you take care of it. The parents yard still looks good after 37 years.