What do you think of this shad tank?

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by JRA, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. JRA

    JRA New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Kentucky
    I ran across this online and was wondering what you guys think. Since it is only 10 gallons, I know it won't hold many shad. It does seem like a cheaper way to get an insulated tank. Here is the site: http://www.geocities.com/davis405/bait_tank.html.
     
  2. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    That looks great!! They make bigger coolers that would flip the bill.
     

  3. shotdemducks

    shotdemducks New Member

    Messages:
    208
    State:
    kansas
    should work out great
     
  4. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    I suppose it depends on your goal. If you want to keep them for just a couple of hours, that tank design *might* work. But if you want to keep them overnight or for a few days, I think you'll be disappointed.

    Why? Because there's no filtration on that tank. Any shad you put in it will quickly puke, crap and shed scales to the point that they'll pollute the water and die. One of the big problems with unfiltered water is that the shad lose scales and end up breathing them in later, where they get caught in or across the gills and cause them to suffocate. Remove the scales and you go a long way toward keeping your shad alive.

    Moving the water helps with aeration but the primary problem in keeping shad alive for any period of time is water quality - both as it relates to "stuff" in the water and the content of ammonia and other chemicals that are harmful to fish.

    Take a look at the design of commercial bait tanks such as the Grayline, Blue Water and Creek Bank - they all utilize a fairly sophisticated filtration system. Here's a web page on the Blue Water tank filtration system: http://www.bluewaterbaittanks.com/filter.cfm and this one for the Grayline tanks: http://www.graylinebaittanks.com/filtration.htm -- those tanks use layers of polyester batting, plus activated charcoal - the batting catches all the "stuff" in the water and the charcoal helps to remove ammonia and other chemicals.
     
  5. Doctor

    Doctor Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Springfield, Ohio
    My first designed Shad tank was that very same set-up, would hold about a dozen Shad for a night of fishing, more than that and they went belly up, now I have the Greyline tank and have had good success with it...............Doc
     
  6. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I thought at one point I had seen the same rig in the library. Check there for plans. I am not 100% though.
     
  7. catrod

    catrod New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    North Carolina
    Several problems with that design; No filtration system first of all. You would have scales, poop and other crap going around in the tank. You need a good current like a circular movement for the shad to swim properly. You also need some way of either changing the water or introducing oxygen into the water for the shad to live a decent amount of time. That tank would be great for minnows or other small bait, but as far as shad go they wouldnt last very long. Go to keepalive.net to see what I am talking about, I have kill lots of shad in my day and not until I got one of their tanks have I been able to keep any alive for any amount of time.
     
  8. JReed

    JReed New Member

    Messages:
    102
    State:
    Lima, Ohio
    I think it was a good idea. Nice and simple.
     
  9. keithcatfish

    keithcatfish New Member

    Messages:
    148
    State:
    Maryville, TN
    I recently converted the livewell in my boat to a shad tank. Here's why and how. Why: Livewells recirculate much of the water in them. Pretty soon shad scales and slime clog the aerator and drain/fill valve and ammonia from fish poop poisons the water. To fix this problem you must eliminate water recirculation. The fill and drain lines for the livewell can not flow through the same plumbing (i.e. the drain/fill valve) anywhere. How: Drill an additional hole in the transom and get rid of the drain/fill valve so the fill line draws water from the outside of the boat and the drain line drains directly to the outside of the boat via gravity. This way, only fresh water enters the tank and the dirty water (scales, poop and all) drains out continuously. With a standard 360 GPH pump running nonstop I can keep 3 dozen 5-8 inch shad alive and healthy all day. I'm certain its a better system for bass tournament fishing too.
     
  10. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    I agree, its called an "open system" .. I thought about converting my livewell, but it wasnt very big, wasnt round, and was made of alum which I thought would be bad for heat..I made this one this spring: http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16308&page=2
    I've been VERY happy with it. Can be used in a recirc or open system and was less than $50 to make...
    Latley been debating on adding a filtration system to it and maybe some insulation wrap just for grins and giggles.. I have not had any problems keeping bait alive so really no reason to mess with it...
     
  11. MississippiJugHead

    MississippiJugHead New Member

    Messages:
    147
    State:
    Missouri
    One of the basics I learned keeping pet fish is that while filtration and aeration are very important another factor in determining how many fish can stay alive in a given container is the amount of surface area you have. The container in the plans is round, tall, and doesn't have much surface area. I would think a rectangular cooler would be better.
     
  12. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    For Shad, you want/need a ROUND tank. They will bunch up in the corners on a square one and kill theirselves...
    Also, I've read on some of the commercial tank sites that they specifically color the inside of the tank Blue to help keep down shadows and light. It helps from spooking the fish and freaking them out (least thats what they say) ....
     
  13. keithcatfish

    keithcatfish New Member

    Messages:
    148
    State:
    Maryville, TN
    To eliminate corners in your livewell just cut the bottom out of a 5 gallon bucket, cut the bucket in half lengthwise then it rivet into place. Viola, no more corners.