WHAT ANCHOR AND ROPE TO USE 24 FT TOON

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by team salmon, Apr 12, 2009.

  1. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    I have a 24ft pontoon and was wanting to know what would be recomended for my water conditions in Kansas. Usual fishing depth 4ft - 30ft with mostly soft bottom however rocky rip rap areas and standing timber is also a factor about 25% of the time. I would like to know style of anchor- weight to use- rope size- and length that would be suitable. So far my thought is navy anchor 30lbs - 7/8 braided nylon 60ft. Any help would be greatly appricated!!! :confused2:
     
  2. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN

  3. CatHunter24

    CatHunter24 New Member

    Messages:
    715
    State:
    Dayton, Ohio
    I have been told that depending on conditions you may want as much as 5x as much rope as the depth of the river....this way in swift current you can hold and be at an angle to the anchor and allow it to bite...so i have 100 ft of rope for the ohio river which averages 20-27 feet near me in many spots...could have used maybe a little more. I know that richter makes river anchors that some swear buy, look like a good set up but can be a little pricey. I use a river anchor, that i picked up at bass pro, probably paid too much but have been told they dig in well, not used it on the river yet, but worked real well in rough lake conditions. hope this helps a little.
     
  4. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    I work construction and I'm sure I can come up with enough scrap iron to give that a try! The best thing I've done lately is join this site!! Thanks for the help guys!!
     
  5. Waterbug

    Waterbug New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    Arkansas
    One thing to keep in mind when using an anchor is the application of an anchor chain. The purpose of an anchor chain to is allow your anchor to lay properly on the bottom so that it gets the bite it needs. I have a twelve pound anchor that will not hold my 18' figerglass boat, but with the use of an anchor chain the anchor has never failed to hold - even when the river current is really strong.
     
  6. CatHunter24

    CatHunter24 New Member

    Messages:
    715
    State:
    Dayton, Ohio
    good point waterbug, forgot to mention that, definately an important part of the anchor set up. Forgot to mention that if you have carpet get a link for the chain that is stainless, so it doesnt rust and stain your carpeting in your boat.
     
  7. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Kyle,
    Although a thicker rope is good for preventing tangles you don't need to go so big. 1/2" or 5/8" is plenty but 60 feet is not near enough. You should have at least 100 feet, preferably more. I have 300 feet on my front anchor and sometimes us it all if I want to set the anchor well upstream from a hole or ledge or timber and lower the boat back...W
     
  8. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    One reason I was really worried about a longer rope is that I won't be fishing any rivers. All flat water but I guess too much is better than not enough!
     
  9. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Kyle,
    If you are going mostly fish lakes then you are going to need a front and rear anchor to keep the boat from swinging around.
    With no current to keep the boat straight you are totally at the mercy of the wind and wash caused by other boats.
    There can also be a need on the lake for plenty of rope. Suppose you mark some catfish (hopefully flatheads) in some of that standing timber you mentioned. The last thing you want to do is drop anchor on them or be dragging your suspended bluegills though that wood as the boat swings.
    Better to toss a marker float close to them, ease away about a hundred feet and lower front anchor. Then ease back right over the marker and go a hundred feet in the other direction. The front hook now has two hundred feet of rope out. Now lower the rear anchor and let out the rear rope as you ease back to the marker and gather in the front rope.
    With both ropes tight you can put the boat right on the marker, the anchors are nowhere near the boat so the fish won't get caught up in the ropes. The fish haven't been disturbed and the boat won't be swinging around.

    Now, lower those baits into that timber and get ready for those flatheads:wink:
    ...W
     
  10. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    You're right - I'm planning on using two I'm also gonna use a pool nuddle and a small piece of pvc thru it to make a float to go on my ropes so if I need I can disconnect and come back to retreive my achores. I'm also gonna hook a droper rope on the back so I can tie my anchore to the d loop at water level and then pull my line up to pull it out with the droper. I was thinking of using a clevis for it so I can disconnect it for storage. Any other thoughts on floats? Thanks!
     
  11. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    Hey Winston - your post made me think a little more about things - just got back and this is what I got - FRONT ANCHOR 150ft 5/8 with a 28lb navy anchor - 4ft chain. BACK 100ft 5/8 with same set up. I figure I drop the front anchor then feed all the rope out plus I have a smaller 50ft rope I can tie to it to move back 200ft off my drop. then drop the 100ft back anchor and pull back tight to the front. I think if the wind isn't up I should be able to hold rather steady in depths of around 30ft. If the wind is up then it's blowning into some bank where the baitfish and cats should be anyways so I ought to be good in 10ft. At the end of the lines I'll put my rope floats and that will be insurance if my smaller rope were to break or I end up having anything else go wrong. Do you or anyone else see anything I could be overlooking? Thanks again for the help!!
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Coulda shaved 10 pounds off that anchor easy.
    Feel sorry for your anchor puller.
     
  13. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    THAT'S WHAT MOST PEOPLE WOULD THINK - HOWEVER- FISHED LAST SAT. DOWN AT POMONA WITH WIND GUSTS UP TO 30MPH OR SO - ANCHORED IN 5FT OF WATER WITH ABOUT 90FT OF ROPE OUT ON EACH END AND AT ONE POINT STILL GOT BLOWN OFF OUR FISHING SPOT - I'D SAY IT WOULDN'T HURT TO HAVE MORE WEIGHT - A 24FT PONTOON ISN'T EASY TO HOLD WHEN YOU'RE BRODSIDE TO THE WIND!!!! AS FOR PULLING UP THAT KIND OF WEIGHT I'M HOPING TO PULL IN SOME FISH AT LEAST THAT WEIGHT SO IT'S GOOD PRACTICE:wink:
     
  14. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    I'm kinda new to the boating world,,but, Last weekend, I began storing my Main anchor at the bottom of the Colorado River,,, My partner was tryin to bring it up and it appears the rope needed some pre-trip maintenance...

    Anyone, have a large magnet, or grapple hook???:smile2:
     
  15. centexcop

    centexcop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Texas
    That's funny... I can relate. I got a new used boat back in the mid 80's. A buddy and I were fishing on a deep lake and had no idea how deep it was. I had been taught to have enough anchor rope. I had a 100 feet and "after the fact" we estimated the water to be 80. Needless to say, anchor got hung up in a tree..... I learned the lakes I fished and got a depth finder after that.