Welding help part 2.

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by whiskerchaser, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    Ok guys its me again im doing better but I cant seem to get my puddle big enough and my instructor says its not hot enough he says im getting ghost welds for now we are just practicing on a 16 gauge piece of metal. I keep getting scared i dont know why but i cant get the puddle big enough and hot enough. Also the ripple that i make does not go straight please help me guys.
     
  2. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    Practice makes perfect. If your machine is not hot enough you can turn it up are slow your weld down. I did a lot of stick weling both vert and horizontal in the past and have even had to do full and partial pen welds with stick. If your useing a wire feed some people use a circular motion I like to use a small triangle type motion. Welding is not hard once you find your "rythym". So pratice and patience is all that you need, the rest will follow. Good luck
     

  3. john barber

    john barber New Member

    Messages:
    114
    State:
    north carolina
    hey brother wish you lived closer so I could show you some those weldig tips alot of them are hard to put into words but here is one .......remember to watch your arc length that also controls your heat as well welding is a very skillfull trade and it takes alot of time to learn but hang in there you can make alot of money at it one day just pm me if you have some guestions I can help with:cool2:
     
  4. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    sorry guys i forgot to mention that im oxy-acetylene welding.
     
  5. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    hey i think i am gonna arc weld tomorrow in school im lookin forward to it

    we also get to cut metal with oxy-acetelyne


    oh this class is fun

    i love it!

    ill proally have questions too lol
     
  6. pk_powell

    pk_powell New Member

    Messages:
    3,485
    State:
    Missouri
    Hold it streadier in correct angle and closer.Some people do what they call a weave back and forth.Hope this helps ya.------------pk powell:smile2:
     
  7. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    Thanks a lot guys also when u leave the torch there too long and the metal gets too hot and pops a hole in the metal and sparks fly do the sparks hurt can they light u on fire?
     
  8. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    yea i would say if they hit the right spot they could catch clothes on fire


    this one dude demonstrated it and what it will do if it gets too hot

    IT POPED and he didnt have glasses on and them sparks went EVERYWHERE

    u gotta think when u are cutting with oxy fuel it reaches like 5500+ degrees

    ITS HOT!!!

    Jeff
     
  9. zappaf19

    zappaf19 New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Monticello,IN
    Yeh you will burn! I have a burn on the bottom of my foot right now from being to lazy to put on boots. Went down the inside of my tennie and then I steped on it. Who says I can't dance? Gas welding like all welding is practice. Speed heat flame distance all have to be right. Just relax and watch the pretty puddle you'll get.
    Bill
     
  10. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    dang whiskerchaser its beginning to seem like you and got an aufull lot in common i am a welder also just experiment with your flame you can make the blue part pretty long before it carborizes to give more heat i like to use a circular motion and only add filler as needed it makes the weld stronger
     
  11. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    223reload i noticed we have a lot too lol the same problems hey guys i got really good and am like the 3rd best welder in the class yea!! thanks for the help and encouragement.
     
  12. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Whiskerchaser i had faith in ya its nice to see ya posting again glad to see you are getting the hang of the torch i just built a 10x20 chicken pen for my daughters 4h project all out of 16 ga 11/4 x 1 1/4 square tubing and all with a torch i dont own a mig and its too thin to arc weld with my 225 amp miller portable
     
  13. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    way to go james !!!!!!!!!!
    i liked the oxy/acetylene pretty good.
     
  14. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Does anyone know why stick welding is called stick welding?
    The answer be a surprise to some.
     
  15. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    OK, I'll tell.
    Anyone who has ever stick welded has stuck their rod to their work.
    I was on Miller's website the other night looking at a welder I have to have.
    At work we have 4 of them and they both mig and tig in a very small portable package. I've seen these welders do both and they are bad to the bone.
    Miller has a a welding tips section on their site and this is where I learned this bit of welding trivia.
    This is the welder.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/maxstar_150_stl/
     
  16. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Welding machines and their capabilities have come along way in the last 15 years. they get more and more idiot proof all the time and with the aid of auto darkening helmets it makes tig welding, something that was difficult to learn much easier.
     
  17. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    I'm assuming you're starting down-hand, on flat stock, with a square groove butt joint and no root opening. Prep the joint by abrasive finishing to bright metal at least 2x the metal thickness either side of the weld, both edges in the joint, and the back side. Wirebrush it clean of dirt and dust. Gloves, goggles, fire extinguisher, safety rules.

    Start with your flame adjustment. For low carbon steel, you want a neutral flame (non-oxidizing, non-carburizing) which will be the hottest flame as well -

    lite the acetylene and turn it up to where the smoke clears from the flame;

    turn on the O2 until you see a fuzzy light blue cone develop around the clean white inner cone - this is a carburizing flame and will make the weld dirty;

    slowly add more oxygen just until this fuzzy cone loses its rounded end and become one with the inner cone (the end of the inner cone will be somewhat sharper).

    Listen to the flame as you adjust - it should not get to a harsh sound, as you will then be oxidizing which will make for difficult control and poor weld quality.

    Now you can heat the parent metal. Set the torch at about a 60 degree angle to the metal surface pointing away from you on the edge closest, with the white inner cone just off the surface about 1/32 inch. This takes a bit of practice to maintain, but will put the most heat into the metal. Watch the temp progress, from dull red, to bright red, to yellow - and then a puddle (don't let it go white or boil/burn) - keep the puddle a bit less than metal thickness to start - then introduce the rod from either the side or from the forward direction. Don't touch the rod to the puddle or it will cool the melt, rather hold it close and let the molten droplet fall into the puddle. Move ahead about half of a rod diameter and repeat in one smoth motion - you'll develop a rythm (this is how you get the rippled bead, which shows how steady and consistent you are).

    Takes a good bit of practice downhand. When you get good, try a fillet joint, which take a slightly oxidizing flame to keep the heat at the joint. If you can't seem to get enough heat, bump the tip size up one and try again. Too much heat will make it hard to control, and you'll melt thru and have those gobs of whitehot metal in your shoes. BY the way, do not wear a flannel shirt (fuzzy surface catches real quick), as many folks have had their shirt burnt off while their head was under the mask.

    Keep at it. There are a lot of artisans ans metalsmiths still using oxyacetylene welding, and it is an excellent way to develop a sense of control leading into stick, GMAW, GTAW, and many other methods.
     
  18. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    mark i hope that was a joke !!!!!!!!!!!!!
    and to think i was waiting for a lesson:embarassed:
     
  19. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    DRC, I know you have gone to strike an arc and clumsily found out your welding rod welded itself to what you were trying to weld.
    Stick welding. You stuck it, sticked it, or better yet, screwed up:big_smile:

    Check that amperage:embarassed:

    Hey, I'm just passing on trivia from Miller.
     
  20. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    of course,
    but i was really thinking i was going to be enlightened that s all !!!:roll_eyes:
    just a side note to that .
    i find that rods that have been properly stored are less likely to stick
    on you than the ones your uncle billybob digs out of a drawer in a garage and hands you expecting you to turn in to paul turley jr. only to find your self with a foot long orange electrode stuck to your project with him snickering sayin something sarcastic like
    thawt u sed u ked weld

    for future reference STICKWELDING is not STICKWELDING its "arc welding"
    sticks fall from trees welding rods is acceptable but electrodes are the proper name for the STICKS:cool2:

    i cant wait to get my arc welder set up in the garage now that ive got an updated electric service.