Water running at Truman?

Discussion in 'MISSOURI LAKES / RESERVOIRS TALK' started by Mr.T, Jun 29, 2006.

  1. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    The Truman information web page says (and has said) they're running 250 cfs through the spillways for the last several days. Anyone been fishing on the upper LOZ in the last few days? Is there enough water moving to make any kind of current at all?

    Going fishing later this weekend and trying to decide between the upper LOZ and drifting up on Truman -- Steve Brown suggested to me the other day that the end of June/first of July would be good below the dam from the 65 hwy bridge up to the no-boating zone if water was moving, but otherwise to concentrate on drifting Truman.

    Ron? Troy? Anyone been out lately?
     
  2. Itch2Scratch

    Itch2Scratch New Member

    Messages:
    1,662
    State:
    Ivy Bend on LOZ, Missouri
    Down here at the 58MM I have not noticed any current at all....we need a lot more rain I think....sure would be nice to have some moving water.:confused2:
     

  3. Taliesin

    Taliesin New Member

    Messages:
    680
    State:
    Missouri
    They have been running 250 cfs for the last several weeks. It's not really enough to do much, but at least it is a consistent flow instead of nothing at all.

    Usually they have been running turbines in the afternoon, but not always (and not lately). A good site to see what the trends have been is: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/mo/nwis/uv/?site_no=06922500&PARAmeter_cd=00065,00060

    All it is intended to show is water depth, but those sharp changes usually mean turbines going on or off.

    By the way... from what everyone up near the dam says they almost always keep the turbines turned off during weekends and especially during the long ones.
     
  4. fishingbuddy4

    fishingbuddy4 New Member

    Messages:
    1,564
    State:
    Warner Rob ga
    yea they were running the same amount last time i was there ,you can see it running down the spillway but you cant tell it in your boat
     
  5. Taliesin

    Taliesin New Member

    Messages:
    680
    State:
    Missouri
    True... 1/4 oz. was enough to keep my bait in one place from the shore on the west side right next to the no-fishing zone.

    Still... It's better than nothing.
     
  6. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Discharge has been slow. They have been running some thru the turbines but it's not been much. You would think with the high temps. they would be genetating more. Best bite seems to be in the evening w/ some flow around 8-10.
     
  7. Taliesin

    Taliesin New Member

    Messages:
    680
    State:
    Missouri
    I don't know... Right below the dam my best times have been around 10 pm to 4 am. /shrug
     
  8. aaronm283

    aaronm283 New Member

    Messages:
    137
    State:
    missouri
    i fished below the dam about 50 hours in the last week nothing over 10 pounds. bites where few and far between at one point i went 8 hours between bites. should pick back up any time.
     
  9. diodeman

    diodeman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Benton Co. Mo.
    The largest of predators are out at night, as I am. Currently there is a massive amount of fresh fry (small fish) in the water so competing with this huge amount of easy to catch prey is difficult but possible to overcome.

    I use a large whole live shad or carp (6-10") for the female flatheads which have completed mating and are roaming for food while the male flatheads gaurd the nest.

    I use whole fresh dead shad for all blues which have completed nesting and are hungry.

    Current from Truman may be only 250cfs but it is perfect for spreading the scent from my large baits. Adjust your habits so that the scent from your bait will bring them in. They are biting but you must present bait that is more interesting than all the small fry that is currently being consumed. I use the biggest shad I can find (preferably 8-10") or up to 2lb. carp. Big baits = big fish.

    LOZ is currently green in color because the algae bloom is at its highest point which benefits the the newborn fishes, the fish time their spawning in conjunction with water temps. which initiate the algae bloom. LOZ is alive with algae and small fry, bluecats are completing nesting and male flatheads are beginning nesting. All of this abundant free food challenges the normal catfishing methods but they can be overcome by providing large smelly or active baits. Catfishing right now is challenging and will remain so for the next two weeks but remeber that the blues are coming off the nest and the female flatheads are roaming in their usual patterns.

    Altering your methods and presentations to place the bait where blues are roaming is best. You're asking fine...now where the hell are the fish diodeman?
    Look for blues in 4 to 12 feet of water chasing down whole shad which are bunched up in schools in shallower waters. Truman's G14's slope from the ramp to the rivers main drop-off zone is a typical hot spot right now, drift through those spots with a big shad below a bobber or float that will keep it at least two feet below the surface but be quiet, turn off the radios, stereos and keep quiet. Use your trolling motor sparingly.

    The flatheads are looking for live fish along travel lanes that extend away from their daytime resting spots in log jams, shoreline holes, rock holes etc. Lay your live baits along their travel lanes. Look for their lairs and remember that the flatheads will be traveling along and through cover at night ambushing their prey. They will prefer to be in at least 3 foot to 10 foot of water, a flatheads eyes are on top of their head so they will be near the bottom looking to jump the fish from the bottom.

    I am catching fish but I must present the fish with something they need, big easy to catch prey.

    Diodeman
     
  10. diodeman

    diodeman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Benton Co. Mo.
    The largest of predators are out at night, as I am. Currently there is a massive amount of fresh fry (small fish) in the water so competing with this huge amount of easy to catch prey is difficult but possible to overcome.

    I use a large whole live shad or carp (6-10") for the female flatheads which have completed mating and are roaming for food while the male flatheads gaurd the nest.

    I use whole fresh dead shad for all blues which have completed nesting and are hungry.

    Current from Truman may be only 250cfs but it is perfect for spreading the scent from my large baits. Adjust your habits so that the scent from your bait will bring them in. They are biting but you must present bait that is more interesting than all the small fry that is currently being consumed. I use the biggest shad I can find (preferably 8-10") or up to 2lb. carp. Big baits = big fish.

    LOZ is currently green in color because the algae bloom is at its highest point which benefits the the newborn fishes, the fish time their spawning in conjunction with water temps. which initiate the algae bloom. LOZ is alive with algae and small fry, bluecats are completing nesting and male flatheads are beginning nesting. All of this abundant free food challenges the normal catfishing methods but they can be overcome by providing large smelly or active baits. Catfishing right now is challenging and will remain so for the next two weeks but remeber that the blues are coming off the nest and the female flatheads are roaming in their usual patterns.

    Alterering your methods and presentations to place the bait where blues are roaming is best. You're asking fine...now where the hell are the fish diodeman?
    Look for blues in 4 to 12 feet of water chasing down whole shad which are bunched up in schools in shallower waters. Truman's G14's slope from the ramp to the rivers main drop-off zone is a typical hot spot right now, drift through those spots with a big shad below a bobber or float that will keep it at least two feet below the surface but be quiet, turn off the radios, stereos and keep quiet. Use your trolling motor sparingly.

    The flatheads are looking for live fish along travel lanes that extend away from their daytime resting spots in log jams, shoreline holes, rock holes etc. Lay your live baits along their travel lanes. Look for their lairs and remember that the flatheads will be traveling along and through cover at night ambushing their prey. They will prefer to be in at least 3 foot to 10 foot of water, a flatheads eyes are on top of their head so they will be near the bottom looking to jump the fish from the bottom.

    I am catching fish but I must present the fish with something they need, big easy to catch prey.

    Diodeman