Warm Water Treatment Plant by River

Discussion in 'ILLINOIS RIVERS TALK' started by SPowell, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. SPowell

    SPowell New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    Illinois
    I have heard that if you can fish by a warm water discharge, there are a lot of cats. By my Dad's house, there is a warm water treatment plant that dumps warm water directly into the river. Would any of you think this would be a decent spot to try? I haven't fished it before, but it seems to be a promising spot. Thanks!
     
  2. Doyle

    Doyle New Member

    Messages:
    582
    State:
    Illinois
    A lot of catfish(mostly Channel) are caught in the warm water discharge at the lake I fish. I think shad, Perch, strippers, and catfish all like this warm water.
     

  3. astutzman

    astutzman New Member

    Messages:
    243
    State:
    Collinsville, IL
    There's a power plant colling lake down near Springfield that is one of the best catfishing lakes that I've ever fished on. It seems like the fishing in the discharge is better in the winter and early spring, becasue the water gets really hot in the summer. Check the water temperature there, if it's not too hot, they may still be biting.
     
  4. astutzman

    astutzman New Member

    Messages:
    243
    State:
    Collinsville, IL
    What river are you fishing on there, by the way, Sean?
     
  5. SPowell

    SPowell New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    Illinois
    This is actually the Grand River in Michigan. It is near my parents house, literally like 3 blocks. I'm excited to check it out. I've caught a lot of flatties on the Grand, but I'm just now discovering this spot so close to home.
     
  6. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    If the water is not hot when they are discharging, you may be able to catch skipjack there. If the water is hot, fish the seam between the discharge and main currents.

    I don't fish for cats at the power plant discharge here but have talked to several people who do. They claim to have caught some really big cats. I catch lots of skips before the water gets hot (they start generating) but it slows considerably once the discharge water heats up. With all the baitfish in the area, it seems a likely place for cats to be.
     
  7. SPowell

    SPowell New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    Illinois
    Yeah, the water isn't hot at all, just a little warmer than normal. I need a cast net for skipjacks. I've been meaning to get one too. Thanks for the advice!
     
  8. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    It's tough to catch skippies in a net. They are fast little buggers! Try using a light action rod n reel like a zebco 33 or similar. Tie a couple of small jigs in a line and throw against or perpendicular to the current. Vary your retrieve from really fast to letting the jigs sink a foot or two. Color can make a huge difference so try several colors if you have them. I have found that the most productive colors for me are white, silver, or chartreuse. Some days they hit weird combinations of colors like an orange head, black body, chartreuse tail. Some days they don't hit anything. That's fishin...even if it is for bait.

    The discharge water here is quite a bit warmer than the river now so we catch more on the fringes of the discharge. The water will get as hot as 115 or more later in the summer. It's still worth giving it a shot for fresh bait.
     
  9. QUECAT

    QUECAT New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Illinois
    I agree a warm water discharge can be a very good place to fish at certain times of the year but I would suggest first to find out what type of treatment is the water being used for.
    Example if its just cooling water for a power plant or a factory and never comes in contact with the physical process you probably will have a gold mine but if it actually is part of the process toxicity may occur and leave a dead stretch in and around the discharge [ like a wastewater treatment plant that uses chlorine], while the residual chlorine will eventually disapate in the river it may take awhile depending on flow and existing organic matter.
    Just beaware and alert of what your dealing with.