Walleyes preferences

Discussion in 'Walleye Fishing' started by barbel, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    I am just getting into the idea of fishing for walleyes. Most of them are small around here, but I would like to know some of the better rigs and jigs out there that catch them. Colors, etc... things like that would be most useful. Thanks in advance to anyone that can help me out.
     
  2. ArkansasRiverBlues

    ArkansasRiverBlues New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Casting 1/8-1/4 oz jigs with orange, red, chartruse, or white curly tailed grubs or sassy shad. It is very important to keep the jigs moving slowly and most importantly constatly keep them bumping the bottom. If you are reeling so slowly you can feel every little rock and hump on the bottom, youre doing it right. You'll lose some jigs this way at first, but you'll learn to get the feel of just lettling the jig barely settle to the bottom before lifting it off to fall again without getting snagged. Tipping jigs with crawlers or minnows also works well. I almost always use plastics, i seem to get bigger fish than with live baits. Fishing with 2 jigs in tandem usually works better for me than using just 1 jig, plus you can cast farther, and fish at 2 levels at once, and with 2 baits or colors to see what they prefer.
     

  3. catmankev

    catmankev New Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Valmeyer, Illinois
    I use 3" Berkley Power Grubs tipped with a medium sized minnow. Usually pumkin colored body W/chart. curly tail. I vertical jig this staying in contact with the bottom. Work this up and down slowly. Walleyes bite very lightly,sometimes you won't even feel the bite just the sudden weight of the fish. The size of the jig head is determined by the current if fishing a river. I prefer at least a 1/4 oz. or whatever it takes to keep your line vertical.
     
  4. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    Minnows, nightcrawlers and a variety of other lures worked good for me when I was in walleye waters.

    One thing I found out while fishing the Spanish River chain of lakes in Canada, Walleye love leaches. They can be caught on a 4" to 6" black plastic worm.

    Another trick for catching them at night is to listen for them to bust the minnows with their tail. They'll stunn them then leisurely go back and pick up the stunned ones. When you here the splash, cast your minnow to the sound. This takes a light spinning outfit to make it work.
     
  5. Jagal

    Jagal New Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    Evansville, IN
    I have had a lot of luck with walley harnesses with nightcrawlers for bait...this rig is also effective for northern pike. I have also had luck catching walleyes using chartreus and orange crankbaits. I caught a nice one last year with one. I even managed to catch a musky on a walley rig. It is a very verital lure.
     
  6. capt.kirk

    capt.kirk Guest

    BARBEL
    i have read and been told that slow trolling at night with those floresent
    green colored crawlers bumping them on the bottom works well,also use
    light tackle so you can feel every touch.i no longer live where there are
    walleye so i have not tried it,but it sounds like a good idea.
    GOOD LUCK :)
     
  7. Jagal

    Jagal New Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    Evansville, IN
    I have also had a lot of luck with leaches on a carolina style rig...just bouncing it off the bottom. Doing it this way if the walley aren't biting the small mouth bass will. It is also good to find a nice drop off or a point or a big hole on the bottom they are most likely to be there. Then just drive your boat up wind of the hole or drop off and drift back over it while bouncing your rig. I like to find whatever under water structure I can and fish around and over it too.
     
  8. sal_jr

    sal_jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,390
    State:
    Ithaca, MI
    for the right advice I'd need a few things- the structure youre fishing, water clarity, temp, what spwan if any is on of baitfish, and time of day or night you're gonna go.

    I fished many places for walleye... literally world class places, like Dog and Esnagi lakes in canada, the french and pickerel rivers off Georgian Bay in Canada, as well as the bays de noc in the upper peninsula of michigan, lakes huron, st clair and Erie as well. Ive had nights where my brother and I filled a big white cooler with 7-9 pounders and nights where I got 30 of em between 17-25 inches and my boat partner using the same bait but a different jig style got skunked. Walleye are a lot of fun to catch but the technique is really really really more important than the color.

    One thing to remember- and I also have to give props to arkansasriverblues for the jigging hints- walleye bite usually on the end of the drop, not the beginning of the jig action.... or a better way to say it is that they bite just before the trough of the jig, never on the crest.

    4-12 inch jig action is plenty in colder clearer water. In cloudy murky or hot water you may be able to do 2-3 foot jigs with better success.

    My go to jig is a gamakatsu 1/4oz stinger jig in a orange, black and green pattern from bass pro with a 2 1/2 inch mister twister white jig and a minnow on a 3" stinger treble hook. From there I will determine what needs to be changed replaced or discarded. If the alewifes are up and running, I switch to a blackback shad rap and cast every direction or troll around the dam or waterfall. As soon as twilight hits I switch to a blueback and continue.

    If you have a narrows between the deeper holdout holes where the walleye suspend all day and dont likely feed, and a waterfall, river mouth, or place where fresh bait will be found after dark, fish the narrows from 7pm till twilight then bolt your butt over to the bait source feeder creeks or waterfalls or dam.

    PM me if anyone has questions on this or specific conditions. I will do my best for recommendations.

    Best of luck to ya.

    Sal
     
  9. nuthinlikeacat

    nuthinlikeacat New Member

    Messages:
    517
    State:
    Eden Prairie, Minnesota
    I strictly use a lindy rig tipped with leeches. If leeches aren't available, then Crawlers will do.
     
  10. Larry

    Larry New Member

    Messages:
    707
    State:
    Minnesota
    Lindy rigs with floats on it. Make sure your using a small hook (no circles), tipped with Crawler, leech or minnow. If they are finicky (tap tap tap goes the rod tip) let out line and let them take the bait with out any tension.
    Good Luck. and Good eats
     
  11. Jagal

    Jagal New Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    Evansville, IN
    It's just a matter of testing out what works in your neck of the woods barbel I have always fished for walleye up north in minnesota but lately I have been trying to get better at sauger and walleye fishing in the ohio river. even though sauger don't get as big I'm sure they are just as tasty. so just keep trying things out until they work barbel. pay attention to the conditions when they do work.
     
  12. misterwhiskers

    misterwhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    273
    State:
    Trenton
    read they see orange and yellow better then most other colors.got an orange rapala and caught a bunch.Maybe coincidence maybenot?

    caught them with blue,white and shad color rapalas but more with the orange lure
     
  13. Dabluz

    Dabluz New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Where I live in Quebec, almost anything within reason will catch walleyes. However, my favourite rig is a 1/4 ounce marabou jig tipped with worm (minnows are not allowed). Any colour of marabou is fine....as long as it's black. However there have been occaisons when a white marabou jig was the ticket on overcast days and murky water.

    Marabou jigs are hard to find so the best thing is to make them yourself. You can even add a dash of colour by changing the colour of the thread when you tie the marabou feathers to the jigs.

    One trick that I always do when tying new black jigs....is adding a stripe of bright green marabou to each side of some of the black marabou.

    My second favourite colour for marabou jigs is yellow, with a good stripe of black marabou on each side.

    Marabou jigs sink faster than jigs with soft plastic grubs, so don't forget to tie a bunch of 1/16 to 3/16 ounce marabou jigs. However, finding jigs this size with a nice large fine wire hook is difficult. I guess I will have to start making my own lead head jigs.

    Finding jigs to tie marabou feathers is not easy. There has to be a short shank of lead on the hook just behind the head of the jig. I file down a groove around this shank so that the marabou is well anchored and that they will flare out more.

    Tie the marabou quite short. About 1/4 inch beyond the hook is about perfect. Of course, use jigs with the best fine wire hooks you can find.

    Tying marabou jigs is fun. The companies do not make them much anymore. They are more expensive due to materials and must be hand made.
     
  14. General

    General New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Michigan
    i use crawlers, a night crawler, and a pencil bottom bouncer and that works great for slow troling or just drifting down a river.
    -josh-
     
  15. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico


    I have the same luck .
     
  16. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin New Member

    Messages:
    224
    State:
    Logansport, Indiana
    First off are you fishing a river or a lake?
     
  17. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin New Member

    Messages:
    224
    State:
    Logansport, Indiana
    I just noticed how old this thread is.