waitingon flatties?

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by hock_paul, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. hock_paul

    hock_paul New Member

    Messages:
    246
    State:
    illinois
    How long do most of you guys wait at a spot before moving to another? I fish a medium size river with live green sunnies and usually have 3 rods out and i usually fish at night. Also, are inside bends that are across from or close to the deeper holes the proper places to be fishing at night? It seems that i get out at night and start in the holes, then kind of hop around between holes, runs, and inside bends.(i get kind of antsy and confused.) I have'nt connected with a flattie yet and just wanted to see what you guys thought. Thanks a lot! and GOOD FISHING FELLAS!
     
  2. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    If you can fish a rod in the hole and a rod on the flat at the same time I would do that. Your third rod can be placed in between. You might not be waiting long enough. If you are fishing from the bank it may pay off to wait it out. Now that is has been hot the bite has gotten later in the night. Atleast here anyway. Patience is the most important aspect when it comes to flatheads and we all come home empty handed more than we would like. Just try to find something that will keep you entertained while you wait. If you can move easily between hot spots Id give each spot an hour, with baits placed at all potential locations.
     

  3. slikk03

    slikk03 New Member

    Messages:
    2,507
    State:
    illinois
    im glad you posted this, what about when fishing a lake from the bank, how can i increas my chances of a flathead finding my bait, how long before you recast, or move to another spot on the lake i waited all night and then caught a 27 pounder but ive sat all night and caught nothing more times than that
     
  4. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    I tend to fish the deep banks more than the inside bends - I like spots where the bank drops sharply and there are downed trees in the water or some other cover. I read a study a wile back where some guys tracked flatheads and, yes, they spent more time on the shallow flats at night than they did during the day (like some versus none), but they still spent more time deep than shallow even at night! ("Deep" is a relative thing - in this case it was like 5 to 10 feet for the deep stuff and 1 to 3 for the shallow). Anyway, I figure that they are not constantly cruising, that a lot of their time, even at night while hunting, is going to be spent in good ambush spots, and that means cover. Like arkrivercatman said, if you can cover the deeper stuff and the flat at the same time, that's best. While anchored along the deeper bank, with one or two baits along the edge of the cover, I always have another bait tossed out toward the open water sand flat - and that one often produces the best fish for me.

    As far as time - some people like to wait for the fish to turn on or come to them. I am a mover. I often hook up within minutes of putting baits out in a new spot, so if I haven't gotten a bite within 30 minutes I am gone - unless it's a spot that has proven itself in the past, then I'll give it longer. Since you are starting out and trying to find something that works, I would keep moving until you do - but you have to give it long enough for a fair try. I wouldn't sit more than an hour, personally. Once you do catch a fish or two, look at the spot and try to figure out what made it work, and then look for other similar spots.

    One thing to keep in mind about rivers is that they are constantly changing: varying water levels mean that they fish differently from one week or month to the next, and each year changes the location of snags and the depth of holes, etc. Often for me, the spot that was red hot last year is dead this year. Maybe it's because the hole under the fallen tree filled in, or maybe the sand bar moved or maybe all the little branches broke off that fallen tree. You have to keep exploring and adapting.

    Good luck. Remember: the learning is half the fun.