Wade Fishing for Catfish...

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Catcaller, Dec 31, 2005.

  1. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Does anybody esle do any wade fishing for catfish in any of their home waters? We wade the Neosho river in the Se Kansas segment in several spots. Theres a couple of low water dams here that have shallow riffles below them that are hot spots. We'll get out there and catch the hell out of blues from 5 or 10 lb...up to 30 lb or better at times. You can really learn alot about a river by wading it. You might step in a hole one day...discovering it for the first time...and then turn around the next day and catch fish out of it. Some people have a problem with wading...others learn to love it after they actually got in there and tried it on a good day.
     
  2. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    I did some wading when I was younger, but haven't fished like that in years.
     

  3. T-Bone

    T-Bone New Member

    Messages:
    1,125
    State:
    South of Dallas
    Brian, our lakes are down so bad this year, we were forced to wade out to cast out far enough to fish. Now, here's a story you didn't ask for. My buddy passed me by as I was wading back to the bank after casting out. I put my pole in the holder and sat down. It was very dark (new moon). Well my bell goes off and I set the hook. I can here my buddy holler'in but can't make it out. So I tell him "Hell yea, I got a fish". Well I heard him real good the next time and he need help ! I waded out there to him and he had a small catfish in his hand (with a hook in it's mouth) and my other hook (we fish with two hooks per line) was imbedded in his leg :eek: . Seems the fish swam over to him and between his legs. While I thought I had a big one on, it was really him. He told me that one didn't count as a double hitter.

    His leg has healed and he walks way away from where I cast now.
     
  4. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    I do a little wade fishing in the spring and summer, not as much as I would like to. My first fishing experiance was bank fishing and wading the mighty Sabine river with my dad. Many great and wonderful hours spent on that river as a kid and a young adult. Now I do some wade fishing on the east and west fork of the stones river.
     
  5. Redtick

    Redtick New Member

    Messages:
    303
    State:
    Neoga, Illinois
    You would have to break the ice to wade now. :rolleyes: But, on a hot summer day, wading small rivers and creeks would be an excellent way to fish. :cool: The InFishermen show on TV has a segment on wading for channels in the summer this week. :cool:
     
  6. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I have waded the Neosho river ever since I was a kid. It's a shallow enough river that you can get away with it in most places here in Se Kansas. I always try to pack light. I carry a small waterproof Plano mini tacklebox that fits in my pocket for a few hooks and sinkers, a 15' rope stringer, a bait jug with a neck strap (A wide strap helps relieve neck pain), a pair of long nose pliers, and a water bottle that attaches to my belt. I generally wear a pair of old shorts, a tank top or tshirt, and a pair of old hiking boots....along with my gore-tex boonie cap and a pair of polarized sunglasses. (Both help reduce glare from the sun)

    I'll generally wait until the end of april before I start wading without waders. The water can still be plenty chilly willy then...but it's worth it to nail a few 10 lb plus hungry spring blue cats or wipers on medium-light tackle. It's not uncommon at all to get a 30 pound blue cat on. Catching such a fish while wading is a whole new experience...Lol. My buddy got a 27 lb last spring, and it took both of us to land it.

    As far as bait...we generally stick with small perch, shad, crawfish, hellgramites (If available), gar or spoonbill eggs....or old faithful...fresh chicken livers cured with garlic and/or lemon juice.

    We'll wade in the Neosho from spring until it starts getting too cold in the fall. In mid-summer through fall the water is so low that wading is the only means of fishing the Neosho. A boat is generally out of the question after the bottom falls out of the river. Fishing can be tough during those times...but there's still a few channel and flathead spread out. The blues are seasonal, and won't be back until the following spring when they first chase the shad up the river, and then spawn before they go bye-bye again.
     
  7. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    We definately need to start hooking up and doing some fishing Brad. If you haven't been in a long time...you'll love wading the Neosho when everything is hitting in the springtime and early summer. We'll show up at the river at daylight or so...wade until 10 or 11 am for blues...and then when that bite slows down...we'll clean the fish and ice them down, eat some lunch...and then put in the boat and anchor right in front of the dam, and fish for flathead. (Sometimes until late afternoon...other times until midnite...lol)
     
  8. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    can't wait for spring time!!!! got lazy and didn't even make it to la cygne today. I'll definatly be coming down your way come spring time. i'd like to try some of that wading agian, 30 lb blues wow would that be some kind of fun!!!
     
  9. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    oh yeah, wade fishing can really be some fun, especially with some light spinning rods and floats. i like to drift chubs or small suckers, never know what youll catch, channels, smallies, etc. dont do it much anymore though.
     
  10. Cutshad

    Cutshad New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Newalla, Oklahoma (Shawnee)
    Brian, that's one of my favorite ways to fish. My daughters love it also. I don't get to wade near as pretty river as you do, but the North Canadian and Deep Fork rivers are perfect for wading. I even use a canoe every now and then. We don't have the Blues in the canadian and deep fork like you guys do. At least not any size. We do have channels and big Flatheads though. One of my favorite ways to fish is with a long rod and light line, 10 lb maybe 12. I use shrimp, and I will flavor them vanilla or peppermint, and keep some natural. Small weights and and a decent hook. I fish around and behind a lot of brushpiles and get broke off some. I tried heavier line but the action wasn't the same. My oldest daughter goes with me all the time, she loves the action. I thin my youngest daughter prefers exploring after a little incident. We had caught two decent channel cats from behind a brushpile, I threw in again and handed her the pole. She got one of those arm breaking hits and started screaming! She got the fish up and it got around a snag, looked like a 15 pound channel cat. When it came up and started splashing she really screamed and fell backwards in the river. The line broke and she went to the bank. I laughed until I cried! She still loves going just not getting that close!!! For you guys that used to wade and haven't in awhile, you need to get back into it. I do the boat fishing, and all the other stuff, but the wading has been the absolute funnest. Brian we will have to get together and do some wade fishing ! Good Luck and have a great new year!
     
  11. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    The thing I love most about wade fishing is the connection you feel with the river when you do it. It's a good feeling to be out there in the current with the warm sunshine splashing on your back or your face. You have to pay attention to where you step because of all the green moss slickened rocks and holes that lie in your path...camoflauged by the coffee colored spring runoff water. Sometimes even using your stringer of fish with the current dragging on it to keep your balance. Baby steps you tell yourself...but the inevitable eagerness you experience...the anticipation of the spot you're bee lining to that ALWAYS holds nice fish...gets the best of you, and you get your shirt wet up to your neck as you slip, and then regain your balance. That's freaking cold!!!...you're thinking as you forge ahead to your destination. Feeling the now chilly breeze through your wet shirt...you shudder and shiver until you get used to the temperature change and your t shirt dries out a bit.

    You'll be standing in hip deep water...enjoying the solitude of the riffle you have all to yourself. Feeling the tug tug of the fish you already have on the stringer that's tied around your waist...and the lazy current against the backs of your legs as you stand there quietly....your wading boots wedged in behind a rock so you won't slip downstream. Thinking about nothing in particular except that last fish you landed, or wondering silently if maybe that last fish that bit you got your bait. Or perhaps you're engrossed by the blue heron standing in the shallows you've been watching that is trying to catch its dinner in the riffle as well. A wild turkey gobble breaks the silence from the timber at the rivers edge. The hawks or falcons screech occasionally piercing the crisp spring air as it circles incessantly overhead.

    When suddenly you feel that tell tale "tap" through your line as you're feeding it into the current...letting your bait wash downstream. The adrenalin flows immediately...coarsing its way through your veins until you feel its intoxicating effects from head to toe....bristling the hair on the back of your neck. You reel down...feeling intently for pressure or current drag that normally isn't there....not knowing if you're hung up...or if it may instead be a fish on the end of the line that has grabbed your bait as it washed by from behind its current break hiding spot. You set the hook...you see the fish's tail slap the surface of the shallow water...and the rod doubles over and the drag begins to sing from the weight of a nice blue...or even better...a bonus 10 lb hybrid. The fight is on!! And nothing else matters.

    Geeez!! I can barely wait!
     
  12. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Brian...I used to use mono when I wade fish, but like you say...hangups are inevitable...and ten or 12 lb test just breaks too easy. I had a problem with using anything over 12 lb test because the current drag on the larger diameter line doesn't allow the bait to stay on the bottom as well when using little or no weight as I like to do. I switched to braid line instead. The smaller diameter braid line with its superior pound test is the way to go IMO. Twelve pound diameter braid line is 50 lb test...which is way more than is neccessary...but is not a bad thing to have when you need it. I have tried Stren braid and Power Pro...which are both round (Which allows their use on a spinning reel)...and you can't go wrong by using either one.

    I also prefer a longer rod to wade fish with. I have an 11' medium action Predator rod with an Abu 6500 C 3 on it, along with an Ugly Stik medium action 9' rigged with a Penn 4500 SS spinning reel. Both spooled with hi vis 40 or 50 lb braid. I prefer the longer rod because of its ability to move more line while using the drifting technique I employ while wading...along with the longer rods ability to shock absorb the heavy surges a bigger fish sometimes makes.

    I'll use an Excalibur rotating treble to keep liver or eggs on the hook better...especially if I plan on eating what I catch. If I know I'll be releasing any fish or am using live bait...I'll use a Gamakatsu octopus circle hook to minimize gut or gill hooking....ensuring that the fish will live if it's released.

    Absolutely we'll have to get together and do some wading in the Neosho...just let me know when...and I'll make plans. In the spring and early summer, I'm on or in the Neosho 3 or more days during the week after I get off work in the early morning (I work the third shift)...and usually both days on the weekend. The best fishing is during the week...when most everybody else is at work...and you get a more private experience. Although even during the weekend it still isn't exactly crowded by most peoples definition....especially if you boat downstream a couple miles to a more secluded area. Sometimes we'll combine a boat fishing trip with a wading excursion like that. Taking the boat down the river...anchoring...and then getting out to wade. You can really work a series of holes over like that.

    Pick a time to go...more than likely I'll already be planning to be there....and if I'm not...it's not hard to twist my arm into going anyway...lol. Most times I go it alone. I'd enjoy the company.

    Brian
     
  13. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    Hey Brian,

    I look forward to doing a little wade fishing with you this spring. I've wade fished quite a bit but always for "other" fish. I fish the upper end of the Veridgris river above Oolagah and slay the sand bass each spring. I know the catfish are there also but I never really think of putting anything but a lure when I'm catching the sandies. I'll have to bring a few pounds of spoonbill eggs with me for you to show me how it's done.
     
  14. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I'll plan on it too Chris...I've been telling you about this for over a year now. You need to get your butt up here and try it out!

    During the whitebass/hybrid run...I'm the same way. I love to catch the both of them. Of course wiper win that contest...but the whitebass are fun too because of the sheer number you catch of them. I rarely deviate from throwing jigs, rattle traps, and spinners when the WB run is on. But I will if the action is slow, or if I see someone else catching early blues or boil channel cats.

    I know you already know this from talking with you a couple weeks ago...but I'll say it anyway just in case...If you bring spoonbill eggs...just make sure they're still in the egg sack and have been dried out before they were frozen. Otherwise...they're near impossible to keep on the hook....and using a piece of panty hose or cheese cloth to secure the eggs takes away from the experience because the eggs can't flake away from the wad you've got hooked...going downstream a few at a time...which in turn attracts fish to your hook.

    Brian
     
  15. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    Hopefully in mid March through May we will get some good rains going and get the spoonbill stacked up below the low waters dams up here. I lost all my spoonbill eggs and the rest of my meat and fish several months ago because my daughter opened the deep freeze and I didn't notice for three days. :eek: The smell in the basement was bad to say the least. I've always kept the eggs intact in the sack but never dried them out. I'll be sure to do that this spring.
     
  16. Ohio_River_Rat

    Ohio_River_Rat New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Charlestown, Indiana
    about the only wading i do is creeks and streams for smallies, lmbass, and channels. The river around here is the Ohio so the only wading i have done there is running trot lines.
     
  17. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    I commonly wade fish the waters in bicycle range of my house. This includes the mighty Susquehanna River, and a few of its tributaries. I love wade fishing for smallies and channels!
     
  18. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    I absolutly love wade fishing. Between March and May I hit an old roadbed at the lake and target crappie and gill's. We have even gone out in Febuary and done well.
    I also enjoy tube fishing for catfish. I have a friend who sets jugs in a cove and retrieves them by tube.
    I use neopreme waders because of the added insulation in the cold water as well as they are bouyant. Nothing worse than falling over in plastic/pvc waders. I have seen a friend fall over in neopreme and he just bounced back up to the surface.
    David Frantz
     
  19. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I use neoprene waders when the water temps are still in the 50's and under. I always wear a belt, so if I do get dunked they won't fill up as fast and drag a guy down. Buoyant huh? That's very interesting. I'd hate to find out otherwise the hard way though. I'll be trying that out in the pool first when the temps get back up warm enough to do it.
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Buoyant waders? I never liked waders up in Montana, but when I did use them, they were on the bottom half of my body. I can just see me floating around with my feet up in the air. Why no waders? They were so hot & sweaty that I got as wet wearing them as wading wet; and besides, after 30 seconds or so in that melted snow, you went numb anyway. The humidity was so low that my jeans would dry walking between holes.