Visiting the James river

Discussion in 'VIRGINIA RIVERS TALK' started by Bigmagic, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. Bigmagic

    Bigmagic New Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Edwards Missouri
    Guys I visited Virginia last spring for the first time since my school days.I desperately wanted to go catfishing(wanted to look up a guide) but I didn't get to. Wound up spending most of the vacation in a Virginia beach hotel(which was great by the way) except for a wasted trip up to DC(too many people) and a brief run thru Williamsburg& Yorktown(had to show my kids) the beach was it. We are planning a repeat trip this spring(earlier prespawn) and I have a few questions.

    Should I haul my 24ft SeaArk with cabin with me or leave it and rent a boat or hire a guide? If I do bring my boat do I have to do anything with the electrical system to protect it against the salt water(is there salt water that far up river). If I stay in the Hampton area I know I'll need to do something to the grounding system but I'm unsure how to proceed. Might be cheaper to hire a guide or rent a boat then to mess with pulling that sucker all the way out there.

    What type of anchor and length or anchor rope are ya'll using? I do a lot of drifting here and it doesn't take over 150ft of anchor rope even when the Osage river is rolling.
    Here at Lake of the Ozarks I use 30lb mono and regularly catch fish in the 40lb to 50lb range what do you reccomend for the James? Anything else I need to consider?
     
  2. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    You're best bet in terms of locating and catching fish is probably to hire a guide. If you want to go the do it yourself route, your boat would be fine. 150 ft of anchor line is plenty. A good depth finder that you can find holes and mark fish with is very important. In fact - it's not worth bothering without it, IMO.

    Fresh bait is also important. Some of the bait shops have frozen shad but it's expensive. To get bait, you would need to have a good cast net - 8 or 10 ft.

    I don't know who rents boats around here (unless you have a military ID card) They're available though. Hopefully someone will post up with some sources.

    You would do your fishing upriver from Hampton. Salt water is not an issue up that far. If you go to maptech.com and follow the online maps link, do a search for Jordan Point, VA. Nearly all of the fishing for blues is done from there down to the Chickahominy River and up to Richmond.

    Hope this helps and be sure to let us know when you're coming. Someone will surely be able to help you out with bait and a few spots to fish.

    /Scott

    When you come, there are a few of us that can help you out and get you taken care of for bait and where to fish.
     

  3. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    I vote on hiring a guide, ( you might want to try two different guys ) for two or three days. Enjoy Virginia with your family the rest of your time here.

    You will jump to the front of the James River knowledge curve. Next time you visit, bring a boat. Good luck and welcome to Virginia.

    I lived in MO back in the 80's. What a wonderful state! I still have friends I go back to hunt with.
     
  4. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    I'm in the wrong business :crying:
     
  5. Bigmagic

    Bigmagic New Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Edwards Missouri
    Thanks for the replies guys. I have a Lowarance X97 and an old X15 on my boat. I am torn between dragging my boat or just hiring a guide. The price of fuel may be the final determining factor. I have a couple of cast nets and 8ft and a 20ft. I will definately need some tips. What style of anchor works best? Hope to see ya on the river this spring.
     
  6. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Sorry about not responding to the anchor query sooner. Honestly, just about every kind of is used effectively. I use a standard ole fluke style anchor with a length of chain of course. Tank uses a Richter. A river anchor (mushroom with flukes) works in areas where all you have to contend with is mud. I guess if you were going to use one anchor with the least worries, the best bet would be a heavy home made wreck anchor. I've lost flukes when fishing over the wrecks. You would also want a heavy rear anchor for fishing when the current is slack.

    To add to the guide option - the cost of one would not be much higher than the fuel used in towing your boat and fishing the river. And your limited time on the water would be much more fulfulling. Nevertheless - if you bring your boat, we'll at least get you going in the right direction.

    /Scott