Unwelcome Catch? What to do?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Jones, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. Jones

    Jones New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    TX
    I've been running trotlines (about once or twice a year) for 25 years. That doesn't add up to a whole lot of fishing, but I enjoy getting out when I can.

    So far, I've only caught fish.

    I am curious about what some of you guys do when you hook other things (turtles, snakes, gar, etc.). Can someone help me out here before I hook one? :confused2:

    Many Thanks,

    Jones
     
  2. Wickedbreed

    Wickedbreed New Member

    Messages:
    37
    State:
    Indiana
    cut the line that hes on....to me id rather lose a hook than a finger!
     

  3. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    I was once bank fishing and caught a darn muskrat... by the time I reeled in most of my line he/she was pretty angry to say the least, I got as much line back as I could and decided it was a good time to call it a day!

    Cut the line and hope for better luck next time!!!

    Cheers mate
     
  4. westkybanded

    westkybanded New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    Kentucky
    As a kid, we used to run trot lines alot in the green river. I can remember turtles, beaver, fish, tires, logs, deer carcas, ect.
     
  5. r_p_narramore

    r_p_narramore New Member

    Messages:
    179
    State:
    East KY
    If its a turtle I keep it. They're good eating. I once hooked a beaver on a rod&reel. The fellow I was fishing with started to get the net. I told him if he put it in the boat he was going to be wearing the paddle for a hat. I cut my line and let the beaver keep my spoon.
     
  6. catseeman

    catseeman New Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    State:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Decisions,decisions,decisions,
    easy answer, If i want to keep the hook i unkook object.
    If i don't want to keep the hook i cut line.
     
  7. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Trot lines drown many critters.Limb lines catch many more "live" critters of all types.Even Hogs and Bears are subject to getting hooked while stealing your fish.I was taught to and have always done my best to release everything that I would not use,with the least amount of damage.Even the snakes that were poison,as safely as possible.As each situation is different,there is no cut and dried answers.Your safety first.The critters second.Being that you are thinking about it,is the best thing of all.It means that you will do O.K. Look carefully.Think it out.Do it.A pair of pliers capable of cutting the largest of your hooks in half if needed is a big help.Also a long,strong hook remover with a lot of reach.A device such as the Berkley "Lip Grip" is handy using in the mouth of Snakes,Gars and Turtles.It keeps your fingers out and the mouth open to remove the hook.Caution! Do not lose your cool WHEN Snakes and Eels wrap their bodys around your arm.They all will bite if you give them a chance. peewee-williams
     
  8. Fisher14

    Fisher14 New Member

    Messages:
    73
    State:
    SC
    I try to release everything that I possibly can. If a Gar gets on, then I'll reel him in, get a pair of needle-nose pliers with the long reach and try to get the hook out. With a snake, I would probably cut the line because I just don't do snakes very well. Beavers or muskrats.....cut your line before they get too close! Depends on the size of the turtle. I don't eat turtle, so if it's possible, I'll let him go.
     
  9. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    I cut the line once i caught a cotten mouth he rolled up in my line worse than a ell
     
  10. Stainless

    Stainless Member

    Messages:
    185
    State:
    Ft Smith, AR
    Here recently I have caught a cotton mouth and three gar. I caught the cotton mouth on a yo yo that didn't have any bait on it. Some guys at work through it on fellow BOC member "okiekrawler" thinking it was just a water snake. The gar I caught on jugs and a trot line. The ones caught on jugs we released but the one on the trot line drown. While getting one of them off a jug, it got a few teeth in my friends hand. He didn't like it to well but he'll survive.
     
  11. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    if I did that (trot'ing) & got something like a Beaver/Big Snake/other animal & knew it was going to suffer a slow death from the swallowing the hook or something I would prob just put the creature out of it's missery. I HATE snakes but I dont like seeing creatures suffer. I ALWAYS have some sort of handgun on or around me when I am fishing. Now w/ that being said I put a large hook through Goldfish, Shad, Bluegills, Bass, etc... each time I go out, doesnt make much sense does it?
     
  12. ersel

    ersel New Member

    Messages:
    1,164
    State:
    Haughton Louisiana
    My buddy caught a Comerant last year on a trotline while trying to unhook it the bird got a beak through his finger and cut it to the bone.
     
  13. Jones

    Jones New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    TX
    Gentlemen,
    This has been helpful.
    I appreciate the comments from the newcomers like me and even the "Knight" and "Master Warriors"!
    Jones
     
  14. Abu65

    Abu65 Member

    Messages:
    583
    State:
    Kentucky
    Muskrat liver just might be good bait!LOL Abu65
     
  15. Eels, I love to catch an eel on my lines especially on a center hook. I just leave them on the hook. They can live for over a week that way and they keep the line jumping drawing in more fish. If your really lucky the stinking eel will draw fish to your line and with his dying breath get eaten by a cat. LOL

    Turtles, all of them barring snappers can be safely handled in the boat. Either pin them to the floor with a foot, or between yours knees. A buddy can hold it as well. The idea is to immobilize it. Use the line attached to the hook to pull the head out. If turtle is on the menu do the deed now, if not grab the hook with a set of needle nose and you should be able to pull it out with a twist of the wrist.
    Snappers are handled differently unless they are on the menu, then you use the immobilize stretch and cut method. Just don't use the between the knees hold (you might be saying OUCH as a soprano). If it is small let it hang by the hook over the boat letting it's weight stretch it out or have a buddy grab it by the tail and pull (turn it upside down to give acces to the throat). Use a SHARP long bladed knife cut and let it bleed out. Make sure it is dead and remove the head before attempting to remove the hook. If you wish to release it use the line to let it hang in the air with it's weight stretching it out. Be sure it cannot get it's feet on anything solid to allow it to lunge at you. Use needle nose (the longer the better) to wiggle the hook out. If you end up with a live and pissed snapper in the boat on the loose get yourself behind it. They can be safely grabbed by the tail and held aloft. I have seen bigger specimens held by the tail with one hand and the other hooked on the shel directly behind the head. I have not tried that method.

    Gar, for some reason do not last long on a line. Maybe they are like some sharks that have to move to keep water flowing over the gills. I have never found a live gar on one of my lines. Most of them are fairly easy to get a hold of and remove the hook with pliers. I would advise the use of gloves on the larger specimens and alligator gar because the scales can be rough.

    Snakes, your on your own on that one. I have yet to catch one and don't want to. I am not by nature scared of them and do know the difference so I guess I could get a water snake loose. Mocassins will get the smith&wesson method.
     
  16. Jones

    Jones New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    TX
    This, too, is a helpful post. I think I'll do some browsing to find a photo or two of snapping turtles. At this point, I'm not sure I would identify one correctly. I just haven't run into any yet.
    Thanks,
    Jones
     
  17. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    The old neighbor guy that showed me and my dad how to butcher a turtle pointed out you should bury the head because they can bite for quite a while after the head is cut off. i don't want to wear one so I never tried to prove him wrong.

    I had a buddy when I was a cub and we would catch a turtle about every summer. We shot one and put it in the icebox overnight. It was still movin in the morning. They are tough. It was 20 years ago. Don't prove me wrong it would wreck the memory.

    I wouldn't try to get your hook out of one at all unless you are familiar with them. Snappers have quite a reach. Anyways you can't lip hook them so it seems like an iffy deal to me.

    God gave you fingers. All you gotta do is not lose them.
     
  18. kccats

    kccats New Member

    Messages:
    634
    State:
    Olathe, Kansas
    2 years ago, I was tring to get shad below Clinton Lake Dam and was not having any luck. On the bank there was a very large gar dead, having been disgarded by a fisherman.

    I decided to cut it up and use it as cut bait.

    I opened it up and could not beleive what I found. This gar had a whole belly full of hooks. Some new, some old and nearly rusted away. Two of the hooks had steel leaders on them!

    I have always been concerned about fish that break my line and what happens to them. I would have never beleived that a fish could have a hook in it's gut and still be able to digest. Obviously, my concerns are incorrect.

    I have caught quite a few turtles in my day and I have always taken the time (and the chance) of removeing the hook, even on large snappers.
    As for me, from now on, I will be cutting my line.
     
  19. loki1982

    loki1982 New Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    Im a reptile freak and well just about respect most species of animal even when they are a nuisance. For turtles I remove the hook when possible, or cut the line and release when I can. Snakes I would do the same, although the chance of catching a snake on trotline is very very slim. Snakes dont go cruising out in deep water for meals, let alone dive down to where your trotline is. And gar, it depends who im with. When fishing with my uncle, gars are killed on sight. When im alone or with my dad we let about 3/4 of them go, and occassionally take our frustration out on one.
     
  20. Dmitri

    Dmitri New Member

    Messages:
    577
    State:
    Illinois
    If it is a gar or some fish I don't want I'll get it as close and possible and try to remove the hook. If it is a snake I'll usually just flat out cut the line. There is no reason to risk getting bit. As for turtles, I usually let them go but recently I got the mindset that I would keep them and eat them. A buddy of mine now has 3 tutles that are all over 1.5 feet in diameter that he has been raising for years just to get big enough to feast on so I figure I would leave any I catch in their aquarium. Even though There are no longer beavers near where I would be putting out a line, if I hooked a mammal I don't know if I would try to get it near enough to get the hook loose because some of those can get really nasty. I've seen squirrels get cornered in a feeding house that was put up on a tree and send people to the emergency room by tearing their hands or faces to shreds. But I do agree, while whatever animal it is, it's safety is very important but should not be put above your own.