Type anchor for the James

Discussion in 'VIRGINIA RIVERS TALK' started by Mildog, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. Mildog

    Mildog Member

    Messages:
    86
    State:
    Virginia
    Hey guys,

    I am starting to plan a trip to the James to get in on some of that great action you guys are having. I have a million questions, but the first is what kind of anchor(s) do you use? Is there a particular style best suited for river use?
    I have a danforth on my center console, but I am worried that it could get snagged. I regularly fish in Lake Anna, and that is like fishing in a swimming pool...very little bottom structure and almost no risk of losing an anchor.
     
  2. JPritch

    JPritch New Member

    Messages:
    1,852
    State:
    Lynchburg, VA
    I use a river anchor. Seen almost every kind you can imagine being used on the river though.

    A danforth should work well. I've been on a boat where one was used and it held.

    I think the key with the James is scope, not so much type of anchor as most are plenty capable of holding. Make sure you're bringing 150'-200' of anchor rope preferably with chain. That's the key to getting a good hold with the current here.

    When I first started fishing the river, I could rarely hold bottom, and it's because I thought of anchors as holding due to weight. As soon as I figured out to use the rope length I had available, I cannot remember the last time I lost hold on the bottom.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2009

  3. bluecat69

    bluecat69 New Member

    Messages:
    293
    State:
    Tupelo, MS
    Good question. I currently use two (one front an one back) 20 lb river anchors on my 17.5 ft Carolina Skiff but have also used danforth anchors also. I have paid my dues to the river gods (lost them due to hang ups) with both style so in my opinion either one will work.
    Make sure that you have at least 100 ft of rope cause will need that extra rope when the tide is rollin hard.
    Hope this helps out.
     
  4. Madtom

    Madtom New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    virginia
    Make sure you have atleast 5 feet of chain on your anchor. 10 would be better. I don't have to put out that much rope and I fish with a 20lb wreck anchor. I don't set mine either I let it tightn up then bump it forward to keep it from jerking. Hope this helps.
     
  5. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy Active Member

    Messages:
    1,651
    State:
    Virginia
    Dansforth, wreck anchors, river anchors, they all work. Like Josh and everybody is saying. Lots of rope. Good rule of thumb is three times the depth you set up in and make sure you have a long piece of heavy chain. I use ten feet of chain.

    I also carry two anchors,(Thanks Bruce). If I ever lose one to a snag, I have a spare and my fishing day is not ruined.
     
  6. Steve Knox

    Steve Knox Active Member

    Messages:
    482
    State:
    Richmond, Virginia
    Name:
    Steve
    No matter what anchor you use, attach the chain/rode with a shackle to the bottom of the anchor. Then use a light weight nylon wire tie or twine to tie the rode to the top of the anchor. That way if you ever hang up, you can break the wire tie/twine and pull the anchor up from the snag by its bottom. Also carry extra wire tie etc. to redo it if necessary.
     
  7. Mildog

    Mildog Member

    Messages:
    86
    State:
    Virginia
    I have a river anchor (modified mushroom) and a danforth. I will have to check the river anchor to see if it is heavy enough for my center console. I guess I will get another rode with chain as a spare to use with the other anchor.
     
  8. jwfish

    jwfish Member

    Messages:
    405
    State:
    columbus ohio
    I use a riker anchor I beleive it is called It looks just like your basic river anchor withy a handle on top with a metal ring so it slides back when pulling in.Have not lost one yet.
     
  9. Mildog

    Mildog Member

    Messages:
    86
    State:
    Virginia
    I have seen those on the internet, but they seem kind of expensive and I was not sure if they really worked..