turtles

Discussion in 'KANSAS RIVERS TALK' started by Tunnel Rat, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. Tunnel Rat

    Tunnel Rat New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    Kansas
    i for one caught a record amount of turtles this year hope turtles are gone for the year, they were hugh snappers which were pretected by law. are they still?
     
  2. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    well here in ga. we have the common snapping turtle,and alligator snapping turtle.the alligator was protectedup til last year but someone told me they're not this year,i'm not sure.the common is not protected i know.
     

  3. warcraft1975

    warcraft1975 New Member

    Messages:
    1,190
    kansas a season on snapping turtles with a limit of so many a day, i would just eat them..lol
     
  4. warcraft1975

    warcraft1975 New Member

    Messages:
    1,190
    we only have two types of snappers in kansas i beleive one is the common and the other is the soft shell (sub speices) both taste pretty good i tend to think
     
  5. catman73

    catman73 New Member

    Messages:
    142
    State:
    Lawrence Kansas
    I agree with Tom. I can remember when I was a kid here in Lawrence my grandad would bring home some huge alligator snappers and we would eat them up. Was pretty good stuff and watching them snap a broom handle like it wasnt even there was pretty cool too. I guess thats something I have kept as a kid I am easily amused!!
     
  6. Circlehook Jester

    Circlehook Jester New Member

    Messages:
    624
    State:
    Kansas
    John, I caught more soft shell turtles this year than i ever have. I have never ate the soft shells, but have eatin the common snapping turtles a lot. they are really tasty when cleaned properly. We always called them "muddies". But I am with you. I hope those dang soft shells are gone for the year.
     
  7. warcraft1975

    warcraft1975 New Member

    Messages:
    1,190
    thats what i always called flatheads was muddies
     
  8. Circlehook Jester

    Circlehook Jester New Member

    Messages:
    624
    State:
    Kansas
    LOL :smile2:
     
  9. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    Soft shells are a different species, but we do have two species of snappers. Common and alligator. Commons aren't pretected but allitgator snappers are. If I'm correct alligator snappers are only found in the southern part of the state and are considered threatened.
     
  10. warcraft1975

    warcraft1975 New Member

    Messages:
    1,190
    Turtles
    TURTLES

    Common snapping turtles and soft-shelled turtles may be taken year-round. Daily creel limit is eight, single species or in combination. Possession limit is three creel limits. A valid fishing license is required (unless exempt). Legal equipment: hand, hook and line, setline, hand dip net, seine, turtle trap, or gig.

    Printable Version Email Page
     
  11. warcraft1975

    warcraft1975 New Member

    Messages:
    1,190
    Alligator Snapping Turtle 49.73 kB
    Map Key
    SPECIES DESCRIPTION

    The Alligator Snapping Turtle is a secretive deep water turtle of large rivers, swamps, lakes and sloughs. It is active during the warmer months of the year, generally at an air temperature of 65 degrees F or above. Little is known of the daily habits of this large creature. They forage for food at night.

    They mate probably at any time during warm weather. The female lays a single clutch per season ranging in size from 15-50 round, white eggs and hatch in 3-4 months. They are carnivorous, eating anything they can overpower. Platt recommended close scrutiny of any pesticide use or flood control projects along rivers in southeastern Kansas which might seriously harm this turtle. In 1978, they were protected as a threatened species in Kansas.

    Historic specimens are documented from the Arkansas River drainage in Cowley County and from the Neosho River drainage in Labette and Lyon counties. Recent sightings have occurred in Montgomery and Sumner counties. They are probably restricted to the major rivers of southeastern Kansas. The population declines are due to exploitation by trappers and habitat alteration.
     
  12. grandpa7

    grandpa7 New Member

    Messages:
    72
    State:
    alabama
    Have eaten both snapper and soft shell turtles. Both are very, very good. Need to soak out the mud especially in snappers. I put them in a cut off plastic drum and change the water twice a day for a couple of weeks before cleaning. Cleaning is the hard part, especially the snappers.