Turkey calling techniques

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunting' started by Wil, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    i need some pointers on calling toms, all i can get them to do is gobble at me.
     
  2. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    If he heard you, and gobbled back, in most cases he will come check you out. That's the good news.

    Here's the bad: it will be on his time schedule, not yours. That means he may wander off, doin' his turkey thing, and then come looking for that hen (you) in a couple of hours. If you are lucky, he'll gobble a time or two, so you know he's in the neighborhood. If you're not, he'll come sneaking in and bust you. You can up the odds in your favor by moving off a hundred yards, or so. Don't call, until you know he's back, and then once, softly.

    Most people lack the patience to outwait birds like this, but it works
     

  3. brian sax

    brian sax New Member

    Messages:
    187
    State:
    shawnee kansas
    Do these guys have hens with them? If so it would be hard for anyone to call them away from the hens. When this problem occurs try calling to the hens, if you can get the hens to come to you he will follow them right in. If they don't have hens im not sure what the problem is. Just mix it up a bit. If they are cutting you off get real loud with them, if they are just kinda gobbling just to do it, well then they don't have much intrest and are wanting you to come to them. Sometimes a gobble call can get them walking your way. All I can say is mix it up with different calls and styles.
     
  4. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    ya they do have hens but they are extremely territorial, my grandpa hasnt seen a jake where i hunt in the spring in about 3 years because the toms drive them all off i guess. so what im gonna do is get a bunch of hen decoys and then one jake and see if they come to kick some jake butt.
    this year im gonna make it sound like theres two hens yelping because i got a hand free mouth call and i can use a different call with my hands. im gettin good with that mouth call too. thanks for the tips
     
  5. huntsfromtree

    huntsfromtree New Member

    Messages:
    142
    State:
    KC Northland
    Wil, Not trying to argue but maybe the lack of jakes is because of poor hatches??? Sibling Jakes usually stay together which can and will attack and runoff the older, mature toms. Anyway if the toms are aggressive toward jakes try a spring jealously decoy setup, A jake mounting a hen. It really pisses off old toms. If you got a lot of henned up toms try making the hens mad. Cut aggressively with fighting purrs. The best tip I can give is set up close at daybreak in the toms strutting zone or setup and call where the turkeys are heading. They’re much easier to call on their natural travel routes. When you say you can get them to gobble what do you mean, are you getting them to shock gobble??? Scout hard and understand their daily patterns. Also realize don’t over call, If the toms gobbling let him come it may take a while(over an hour). If you can see him and he is henned up get aggressive with the hen and she may bring the tom in….Good luck, turkey huntin… sometimes its easy, but often of the turkeys win. Also between 10am-1pm can be the best time to call lonely toms, becuase the hens are on thier nest.. dont give up if you cant get a bird early.
     
  6. tkyhnt

    tkyhnt New Member

    Messages:
    125
    State:
    Missouri
    Jeff, That is some great advice, I will only add one point and that is if your setting up on birds on the roost they will gobble and gobble, and if you overcall at that point they will not come in. I have seen birds fly from mountian ridge to mountian ridge back east before because I over called why they were on the roost. Get in close early between where they are and where your grandpa see's them first thing in the morning. Just a few calls to let them know your there and then let nature take its course. Like Jeff mentioned SCOUT HARD, this can be from a distance with spotting scopes or by walking around when you are sure the birds are not in the area. Good luck this spring and let us know how you do.
     
  7. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    scouting is not at option for me because where i hunt is 3 hours away from me and i have to wing it. it is not a shock gobble im sure i call and they gobble and i call again and they gobble again. but they dont come at all. one time i had my decoys set up and these two gobblers walked by to my right about 80 yards out and they stopped and gobbled but then walked off. im sure they didnt see me cuz i was behind a bush and was having trouble seeing them myself. there arent poor hatches from what my grandpa has been telling me, every year he sees about 15 more little turkeys in the flock than usual. idk if thats a lot but there are quite a few hens around and quite a few toms too.. i honestly dont know what im doin wrong cuz i can get in close in the mornings and they always walk down the path in front of me but too far for a shot. what would you guys do in my position?
     
  8. brian sax

    brian sax New Member

    Messages:
    187
    State:
    shawnee kansas
    What I would do is find out where that path they are walking down leads to and be at the end of it. Since scouting is hard for you to do, look at some maps of the area you are hunting. You can use your computer to get some good photo's of the land. Plus dont be afraid to try something different or odd. Weird things can happen in the spring woods. I have seen many turkeys die to ideas I thought would never work.
     
  9. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    ill keep that in mind
     
  10. huntsfromtree

    huntsfromtree New Member

    Messages:
    142
    State:
    KC Northland
    Wil, definitely check out maps as Brian said both topos and aerials. Even if you know the property well looking at quality aerials and topos will help. Once I started using maps as a hunting tool I couldn&#8217;t believe the terrain features I missed or overlooked while scouting by foot. I don&#8217;t recommend google earth because the photos are taken during the summer when all the foliage is present check out &#8230;&#8230;<http://www.geocommunicator.gov/NILS-PARCEL2/map.jsp?MAP=USFS>&#8230;for awesome winter Arial photos and mytopo.com. Also you may be over calling or calling to loud its pretty its easy to do when the bird keeps gobbling. Chances are he&#8217;s telling the hen (you) to come to him. One other trick is to get close while the tom is on the roost, and at fly down time &#8220;flap&#8221; you hat quickly sounding like a hen pitching down. Then lightly rake the leaves with your hand sounding like a bird scratching along with very soft purrs and puts. Sometimes that&#8217;s all it takes. I only hunt very pressured birds on public land and understand your frustration. Good Luck.
     
  11. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    thanks i appreciate all the advice
     
  12. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Will I wish to thank you for this thread you have started because I have never hunted turkeys and theres been lots of info to others like me.reps to ya