Truman Tailrace 1st trip bait?

Discussion in 'MISSOURI LAKES / RESERVOIRS TALK' started by POLECAT, Jun 18, 2007.

  1. POLECAT

    POLECAT New Member

    Messages:
    65
    State:
    MISSOURI SPRINGFIELD
    Since I dont have a throw net and not very experienced with the tailrace fishing I'll probably buy some shad at the bait shop. Is shad available fresh or will it be frozen or packaged and what is the best type to purchase for a days fishing ? Polecat
     
  2. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    You don't buy shad, you catch shad.

    Sure, some bait shops will sell you frozen shad but you might as well just put the dollar bills on your hook instead...

    If you don't know how to throw a cast net, now's the time to learn.
     

  3. POLECAT

    POLECAT New Member

    Messages:
    65
    State:
    MISSOURI SPRINGFIELD
    Thats probably a very good suggestion, I'll run over to Bass Pro and get one after work tonite. You know how some of us are - always looking for the easy way out. Polecat
     
  4. whisker_chaser

    whisker_chaser New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Missouri
    This is something that I know I need to get better at as well. What size would you suggest? I have heard several of you talk about using a 20'. Would I be able to throw something that big out of a 15' jon boat full of tackle? Would practicing in the yard be the best way to learn? Thanks guys.
     
  5. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I picked up on the technique pretty quickly so anyone can do it. LOL

    There are a couple methods out there so just find which one works for you. It's pretty cool catching your own bait. PLUS, it works better, and it's cheaper.

    Cast nets are well worth the small, initial investment.
     
  6. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I'd get something around 6 ft radius to start with, the smaller ones are just too hard to throw and the bigger ones take a bit of finesse. The ones with the "accu-throw ring" (available at Wal-Mart, not sure about BPS) might be good for you to learn on, though you'll have to start all over when you switch to a "real" cast net.

    But getting the net and learning to make a passable throw isn't even half the battle -- the hard part is learning to find the shad.

    I consider myself pretty good at finding them these days, but still budget 1 to 2 hours per trip for bait catching. Sometimes I get lucky and catch 50 shad in one throw. Sometimes I throw for hours with little to show for it.

    There have been days that I've spent upwards of 3 hours looking for bait, ending up with time to fish only an hour or two. I'd still rather do that than use frozen or store-bought "shad sides".

    Some folks here don't agree with me, and will use frozen shad or fresh dead shad and maybe have good luck. But I'm 100% convinced that your cut bait isn't really "fresh" unless it twitches when you stick the hook through it.

    And still other folks swear by bluegills, bullheads, etc. -- I may be wrong, but I suspect those same folks have a hard time catching shad, thus enhancing their preference for "easier to get" baitfish...

    When I first started catfishing "for real" I couldn't catch a shad to save my life, and used to always keep a zip-lock bag of them in the freezer to take long "just in case" - and I don't that I ever caught more than a few small fish on frozen shad, which only makes the frustration worse: I couldn't find fresh bait, used my frozen bait, caught nothing, assumed I was a poor fisherman and wondered why I should go back. Things turned around once I realized that any idiot should be able to catch bait if he'd just work at it a little...
     
  7. Fishking

    Fishking Member

    Messages:
    306
    State:
    KC, MO
    Name:
    Andrew

    Might be the best post you have ever wrote Marty...
     
  8. whisker_chaser

    whisker_chaser New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Missouri
    What is a "real net"? Like manufacturer and what it is called so I know what to look for in a catalog or online. We dont have any "real" tackle shops up here in the middle of nowhere. Also once again, how big do you think that I could throw out of a small jon boat? Would it be possible to throw the 20'? Thanks again.
     
  9. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    A "real" net is one with out the "magic easy throw ring"... If you learn to use the one with the ring, you end up with a skill useful but only on nets that have the ring. You'll have to re-learn when you move to a different (bigger) net.

    I currently throw 8 and 9 ft radius nets. You don't have to be 8 or 9 ft tall to throw one, and you don't need a lot of room in the boat. If you've got a front deck that you can stand on without losing your balance, you probably have all the room you'll need to throw a net as big as you want. The advantage to throwing a bigger net is that even a poor throw will generally open up bigger than a good throw on a small net. Bigger open area = more bait with (usually) less work.

    For most folks, a 7 or 8 ft radius net is probably plenty big. As for brand, it probably doesn't matter much unless you really want to drop a lot of change. BPS will carry the Tyzac "Old Salt" brand, usually up to 7 or 8 ft radius. The quality is good enough, given that your net is going to end up with a hole in it big enough for you to walk through, probably within the first few months if not the first few days. (I went through 6 or 7 nets between December and April of this year, a least 2 of them lasted me exactly 1 throw each.)