Trotliners, please step into my office.

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by Blind In Texas, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    I'll be setting out my very first trotline this weekend. Yes, I am a trotline virgin. I have one set up with 6" figure eight loops spaced every six feet for a total of 50 hook loops. 50 is the freshwater limit in Texas.

    I have no intentions of using snap swivels. I will simply pass the loop through the hook's eye then pass the hook through the tag loop. I am using 7/0 Eagle Circle hooks. The Brazos record for Gar is 190lbs on rod and reel and 110lbs on a trotline. I have seen HUGE gar in the Brazos, so, I feel snap swivels are certain death for the hooks.

    Bait will be large chunks of smelly bloody shad.

    I have ideas for deployment. Deployment will be executed from my 14' yak. Here is where the trotliners' collective wisdom comes in. What will be the best way to deploy the line using my yak? Should I use a sail-line method, say.....like a boogie board, and let the line float away in the current as I bait it, then secure the far end? Should I secure one end to a limb on each side of the river? Should I secure one end to a limb and the other to a weight then drop the weighted end into the current?

    Should I just scrap the trotline and stay at home for football cuz I'm a wacko for trying to use a kayak?

    Also, how long should I leave it before I check it. I'm thinking 24 hrs.....I am gonna do this, so, any help I can get BEFORE I make myself mad or crazy would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  2. whisker maniac

    whisker maniac New Member

    Messages:
    2,712
    State:
    arkansas
    One problem with your set up... if you do not use a swivel for your drop the fish will just twist and twist until they knot up the drop and will twist off.

    I always run my swivels on the main line between two knots at the distance between the drops of my choice usually no more than 4ft apart but here in arkansas we can have them all the way down to 24 inches.

    The swivels just slid down the main line does several things. It allows the fish to swim around the mainline without tangling up the drop on the mainline as a drop loop will, and it keeps the fish from twisting out.


    Hope this helps ya
     

  3. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    I agree you don't need snap swivels,but you do need some big barrel swivels to keep the fish from twisting.
    And i would tie off both sides of the line first then start putting your hooks and bait on as you go back across.
    I think 24 hours is way to long to wait to check your lines.in that length of time the fish has too much time to get off.at the most i let mine sit 6 hrs. normally i check them every 2 hrs but thats up to how they are bitting.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  4. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I havent ran or set a trotline in years,But when I made mine,I liked to use a barrel swivel on the main line ,and a snap swivel on the stagings,it makes it much easier to remove a fish while running the line ,and you can set the line ,then add the hiiks as they are baited after. also makes for simple taking up of the line as well.
     
  5. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    This is the way we use to make our up. Saves a lot of headaches later.
     
  6. Jollymon

    Jollymon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,621
    State:
    Wilm .N.C
    Michael which ever way you decide to do it as far as running you trot line make sure u have a good sharp knife wear you can get it in case you need to cut the line or the line hooks you . Don,t want to see anything where they are looking for you ,because of a trot line accident . Run your line have fun, but most inportant stay safe while running it
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  7. boswifedeb

    boswifedeb USCA Jailhouse Lawyer

    Messages:
    13,922
    State:
    Tennessee
    Name:
    Debbie
    First off, I don't think you're crazy. My husband Bo and I have run a trot line out of our canoe. Secondly, you might want to use some trotline clips. These make baiting and removing the HUMONGOUS fish that you will catch much easier and safer. Have a good time and let us know how it goes.
     
  8. sscharlie

    sscharlie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,369
    State:
    Illinois
    Name:
    Stan
    This is so true but I would make sure your wearing the knife rather than just sitting beside you. If it's not attatched to your body, it won't do any good sinking to the bottom of the water. Be careful.
     
  9. Cantrell2500HD

    Cantrell2500HD New Member

    Messages:
    36
    State:
    Cedar Park, Tx
    I do some kyakin myself, most of it on some rivers in Taylor, but I did fish a bass tourney on Lake Bastrop not to long ago. Anyway, when I trotline out of the ol' yak I always have everything set up before hand and easy to get to quickly.
    • Got my main line with drop loops with big barrel swivels already put together usually wrapped around a bottle for easy removal.
    • Then I have my bucket full of shad sittin right there for easy access.
    • Also 2 or 3 weights to put on one end of the line.
    • Then lastly I have my hooks already on my stagging usually stuck around the edge of a styrofoam ice chest that I keep all my trotline equipment in.
    When I find a good spot, I tie off the main line to a tree or stump or whatever is around that can't be drug off. After that I let the current pull me out/down and just grab the hooks when the swivels unroll off the bottle I have the main line wrapped around. When you get done with everything just tie your weight to the end and pattle around till you get a good place to drop it, pull the line as tight as it will go and sink er'.
    Now runnin the line in a kyak is a... unique experience trying to keep yourself from tippin over when your pullin up big burtha. I get next to where I tied off to and let the line run over my lap and pull myself out, or down the line. If I'm rebaiting I'll go ahead and do it while it's in my lap, if not I just let it slide on by if it's empty. When you get to the end and your just gonna pull the line up I remove the weight and start rolling it up, taking the stagings off as I go. If you've rebaited, pattle out and pull it tight and sink er' again.
    I was once pullin one up and had two fish next to each other, while I was trying to get the first one off the second kept trying to tip my over, I just cut the staging when it was in the yak and went for the next one, figuring I'd rather tie another hook on later rather than try to fish all my gear out of the bottom of the river.
    It's kinda lengthy but I figured you'd rather go armed with more knowledge than you need than less than you should. This is just basically how I do it and not necessarily the right or only way. Hope it helps.
     
  10. THE PAN MAN

    THE PAN MAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,213
    State:
    hartsburg mo.
    great info.
     
  11. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    Great info Cantrell. I have a 03 2500HD myself....190,980 miles and still tickin! I appreciate everyone's thought and input. The trotline clips area great idea and really would make life easier ;) I carry a 4" Gerber tactical knife any time I leave the house.

    I went to the river this afternoon after work and the water is still too high to attempt my first trotline, much less from a yak. Right now the entire river is 300'+ wide and 2' above normal. Normally only the bends are close to that. Too risky. The water ain't fast enough to scare me, but, it's cold enough to deter me from flailing around in it while I chase my yak down river. Right now I would still need to jog along the banks (if it were possible, and it ain't) just to keep up with it so it wouldn't get out of sight.

    I think I'll just wait until the water is back to normal flow. It'll still be swift enough to get to get the yak down river a piece, but, it won't get far.
     
  12. Cantrell2500HD

    Cantrell2500HD New Member

    Messages:
    36
    State:
    Cedar Park, Tx
    Thats pretty cool, mine is an 03' also. That ol' 6.0L ain't let me down yet, even after 137,xxx miles!
     
  13. KAYAK CAT KILLER

    KAYAK CAT KILLER New Member

    Messages:
    68
    State:
    Missouri
     
  14. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    Thanks, Casey. I got a great picture of what I need to do and in which order. Very clear methodology. I'll make sure to let everyone know how my first outting is. Since it's raining and cold I am going to opt out of my first attempt for this weekend. At least not on Saturday anyway.
     
  15. jorne

    jorne New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    Texas
    I run limb lines from a kayak, and handling very large cats was a problem until I rigged a flying gaff made from a 10/0 hook tied to old cast net cord. I set the gaff then cut the fish from the limb line and hold on while it play itself out. Then I pull it along side and string it up.

    john
     
  16. superman

    superman New Member

    Messages:
    343
    State:
    DeSoto MO
    One thing i have found is that simply talking to some guys fishing in the same area is great way to get info some guys wont talk much cause they dont want to give up any secrets but alot of guys will have no problem showing what they are using and how they use it and it would not hurt to have someone who has ran lines before with you just in case something happens and all of us who run lines know crap happens i personally have had a buddy cut a leadline while the hook was in my hand and fish pulling the mainline a few hooks down so when you get out there be carefull