Trot Lines

Discussion in 'Kayaker and Canoe Fishing' started by ggoytia, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    Would you recommend setting up a trotline off of a kayak. Any suggestions on when to put one I am kinda still kinda new to fresh water fishing and have a lake 6 miles away with some nice cats. Please advise
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I assume you're talking about a fiberglass kayak, right? Cuz I saw a couple of young guys (that I didn't expect to get any older) running some trotlines from a plastic blow-up kayak. I tried to keep an eye on them, expecting to have to rescue them at any time, but somehow they managed to keep from getting a hole in it and sinking. I see no reason why you couldn't run a trotline from a real kayak, but you'd have to make some well thought out plans for landing, handling, and keeping your fish. For instance, how are you going to land a 20# blue? If you try to lift it, you'll turn over, won't you? Maybe some kind of flying gaff so you can just tow it in to shore?
     

  3. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    You may want to consider tieing "Throw Lines" off the bank. Like the gentleman from little rock stated, landing a 20 pounder mite get a bit hairy for ya. I have limblined from a canoe in the deep holes of the creeks here but always felt like i was just one move away from being wet.
     
  4. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    Throw lines and Flying gaff? Guys Im sorry for the dumb questions I honestly dont know what these things are. I figured I would beat the head are with a small pipe to stabilize the fish before bringing it onboard.:eek:oooh:

    I have a solid plastic kayak not inflatable so no worries there. I would need to get the drill or go extremely fast right into a rock.

    Any other suggestions would greatly be appreciated.
     
  5. Catmaster

    Catmaster New Member

    Messages:
    391
    State:
    SE Kansas
    CountryHart has a good technique. Alot of times when I do not feel like lugging my big 150 pound flatbottom down to the river I will make throw lines. I have never caught anything big doing this but have still caught some nice fish. Once you do it for a while you can realy learn how to fling those bait lines a long ways. I usually only check them in the morning unless I am camping. GOOD LUCK!:wink:
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    A flying gaff is a type of gaff that has a detachable head that has a rope attached to it. Rather than trying to hang onto a gaff handle that may be flailing around dangerously, it allows you to simply let go of the gaff and hang onto the rope. Improper gaffing will kill the fish. If you have any idea of releasing the fish, the proper technique is shown in the picture below. Flying gaffs are generally quite expensive, so I recommend making your own. Buy a LARGE 'J' hook or fashion your own 'J' shaped hook. The advantage of buying a large hook is that it has a barb on it to keep it from accidentally coming out of the fish's mouth. Attach 12"-18" of strong cord, say parachute cord, to the hook and put a loop in the other end. Get a length of broomstick 8"-12" long. Position the hook at one end so that the curve of the hook extends past the end, and the point faces away from the broomstick. Put a small screw through the eye into the broomstick. Now use some 100#-150# nylon cord to wrap the gaff from the hook end of the handle to the other end, making sure you wrap the parachute cord too. Now you should have a very short handled gaff with a provision to allow you to attach a rope to one end of the gaff and stick the other end into the fish's mouth. Again, if you have any idea of being able to release the fish, be sure to gaff it like it shows in the picture.

    A throwline is simply a length of heavy line with a weight and a couple of hooks on one end and the other end attached to something on shore. Throw the hook end out into the water. Be careful of those flying hooks! Check it at least once a day. Now, with a kayak, you can paddle the hook end out further than you can throw it. When I lived in Florida and fished for sharks from shore, we'd use a small boat to take our baits out two or three hundred yards from shore.
     

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  7. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    GGOYTA, never apoligise for not knowing something. At one time i couldn't walk but caught on after awhile. If ya try the throw lines, tie off on a green limb close to the water. If ya do hook into a nice one it has some play, if it's not feasible to do that try tieing a piece of innertube to the bank. This allows for some play rather than a straight pull. if theres anything i can do to help, jus holler.
     
  8. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    jtrew,Catmaster and CountryHart

    Guys I appreciate all your help, the throw lines seem the the safest bet...but just like curiosity killed the cat I will now have to build a flying gaff. I honestly could have used this when I was fishing for large groper and white sea bass in Mexican waters.
    I will be going out this evening and will hopefull advise in the morning with successful results for the throw line. The flying gaff is now a new project!
     
  9. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il
    also, its not out of the question to do trotlines from shore. find a sucure place to tie your line to and have about 10-15 hooks from about 5-7 feet out all the way to the end of the line evenly spaced. with about 1 1/2-2 feet of line at the end to tie the weight on and avoid getting the last hook(and most the time the most productive hook ive seen) from getting tangled up in your weight or getting covered by your weight. to throw it out walk the line to where its along the shore and pick it up and chuck it out there, the line should do almost a half circle and be out far enough, then when you go to check it pull in slowly and walk along the bank as you pull more line it then you should have any hooked fish laying on the bank, then just walk along pick em up and put em in a bucket or whatever you want and rebait, and repeat. any questions or if i didnt explain this good enough just pm me.

    by the way, there are no stupid questions here, ask away.
     
  10. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    CatfishHateMe....
    This seems like a good idea!

    Now do you guys use circle hooks or just the regular hooks that are supplied in the pack?
     
  11. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    i've used circle hooks and the regular trotline hooks with similar results. just make sure your bait is legal, here in nc you cannot use live bait on a trotline, jug line, or set hooks (limblines and throw lines).
     
  12. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    When saltwater fishing, we used a long handled gaff about 10'-12' long when we were on a boat with the deck several feet above the water; when fishing from my 20' CC, we used a gaff with a stainless 4' handle. As long as you're fishing from a deck that's stable enough to allow you to stand up and walk around, you shouldn't need a flying gaff for a fish under 100# unless you're disabled and can't lift it. But a canoe or kayak isn't that stable, so a flying gaff could prove useful on a much smaller fish.
     
  13. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    I usually use 6# stainless on most of my tackle. trotlines, juggs or limblines. Swivels on your trotlines will greatly reduce the amount of twist-off from the blues an channels too.
     
  14. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    Nothing to report guys, got the big skunko.. Rebaited and put them out again hopefully this evening something is hooked on. Ended up tying some 50/50 cord and paddling it out and dropping the weighted line. Thanks for all the help guys!
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    With a trotline, you definitely want your droppers attached with swivels. With a throwline, however, it's really more like the terminal tackle used on a rod & reel setup. Weight on the bottom, and a couple of hooks above the weight. Granted, you usually use a heavier weight on a throwline than when you're using a rod & reel, but other than that, it's about the same. On a rod & reel I use braided line with a mono leader attached by a swivel, but the drops on the mono don't have swivels. And you might want to consider something similar for throwlines, where you are much more likely to get hung up than when using trotlines. I'd use at least 300# test line for my throwline, then have a "leader" of 100# test braided nylon. Whether you attach the "leader" with a swivel or not is personal preference. When you get hung up and have to break off, all you will lose is your hooks, weight, and a few feet of 100# test nylon line. If you use all 100# test line and have to break it, it might break anywhere, and you'd lose a bunch of line and leave a mess in the water.
     
  16. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    Jerry: Thanks for all your info!
     
  17. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Theres a 800 acre county resevoir near my house and it closes at around 7 pm. So the catfishings not to great seeing that it's only open during daylight hours. I'm planning on using my kayak to put out a trotline in the stump fields right before closing and going back first thing in the morning to hopefully bring home dinner. I don't see anything being a problem in fresh water using a kayak. I've trolled for shark in the gulf a mile off the beach on mine:eek:oooh:.
     
  18. TomV

    TomV New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    Warsaw, Missouri
    I think I've seen you before.
     

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  19. ggoytia

    ggoytia New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Texas, Fort Worth
    Never had issues trolling two line behind me on my yak. my concern was getting the fish, snake or whatever is on the hook safely. I to have salt experience with no issues but just like them sabiki rigs to many hooks makes me worry. hahahahaha