Trolling Motor Battery Advice

Discussion in 'Kayaker and Canoe Fishing' started by Boondock, Oct 7, 2009.

  1. Boondock

    Boondock New Member

    Messages:
    31
    State:
    Harrods Creek, Kentucky
    I just bought a 14 foot canoe to fish some local creeks and small lakes.

    I have a trolling motor. My question is what kind of battery should I get?

    My problem is:
    I am 6'8 250 and the weight capacity on the canoe is 500 lbs. I also like to bring a buddy with me and that another 200lbs or so. Do I need a regular size battery to push a small canoe and is it possible to run it off a smaller battery (jet ski battery)? Also do I really need a deep cell battery? I would like to do this the most affordable way, at the same time I don't wanna spend my money foolishly. Any input and opinions are appreciated.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. thunt713

    thunt713 New Member

    Messages:
    328
    State:
    winfield m
    Buy a interstate deepcycle deep cycles dont run down as fast as nomal batt. Even walmart batt arent bad cheaper then interstates.
     

  3. catman-j

    catman-j New Member

    Messages:
    1,020
    State:
    Eastern Nebr
    Get an Interstate deep cycle battery group 27. I ran my trolling motor quit a bit this year and only charged it twice since spring. ALSO, make sure your charger is automatic and won't overcharge your battery. Mine shuts down when the charge is complete.
     
  4. BigBird

    BigBird New Member

    Messages:
    2,104
    State:
    Charlotte, NC
  5. rush_60

    rush_60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,719
    State:
    Troy, KS
    I dont know from experience but some of the other kayak sites have recomended electric wheelchair batteries. Thats what I would go with if I was worried about weight.
     
  6. Flootie16

    Flootie16 New Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    State:
    Indiana
    thats a tought man. i think id have to take the chance and still go with a deep cycle battery even tho they are heavier. u dont wanna get out there and the battery quit on ya
     
  7. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    Deep cycle is mandatory, a regular starting battery might seem to work pretty well at first, but you will kill it after a few cycles.

    A trolling puts a very heavy load on a battery. You can go with something smaller, but in general a 60lb battery will have more than twice the energy as a 30lb battery. Now here is the catch... even a deep cycle battery will be killed pretty fast (ruined, unable to hold a good charge again) if you run it completely dead all of the time. Use too small of a battery, and you will probably end up replacing it frequently. My advice is to stick with a group 24 size battery, which will weigh 50-60lbs, unless you expect to only use the trolling motor at half speed or less for an hour or less, in which case you could get by with a smaller battery.
     
  8. Widemouth

    Widemouth New Member

    Messages:
    57
    State:
    Arizona
    I've got a 16 foot square back canoe that will support 950 pounds of cargo weight, including me and a passanger. I put a Minnkota trolling motor on it that delivers 80 lbs of thrust. I can't pull a water skier, but I can take it up stream against the Colorodo River's current, which is what I want. I would say that deep cycle batteries are the way to go, not the dual purpose marine batteries that are meant to start the boat's engine. With the limited cargo capacity of your situation, I would suggest that if you want to troll around, that you leave the passenger behind, and replace his/her weight with batteries (leaving enough cargo capacity left over to carry home a large flathead). If you just gotta take the passenger, try paddle power. Deep cycle batteries are heavy and expensive, but you need enough power to get back from wherever that big fish might drag you. I would suggest having at least a couple of hours worth of electical power to operate your trolling motor at full capacity, and then operate it at less than full capacity unless you need to. Its not a good idea to push your batteries below 40%. Just some suggestions.
     
  9. Widemouth

    Widemouth New Member

    Messages:
    57
    State:
    Arizona
    If you do get some heavy, deep cycle batteries for your canoe, and decide to operate the canoe by yourself, put the batteries up front to ballance out the load. I rigged my canoe with some heavy guage wire, under the gunnels, from the back to the front, which allows me to keep the battery weight under the front seat when I go out fishing alone. Don't forget to allow for the weight of a good river anchor, the trolling motor itself, and any fishing gear, bait and drinking water (or other liquid refreshments) you might take with you.
     
  10. rush_60

    rush_60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,719
    State:
    Troy, KS
    Also when buying your batteries, see if walmart has what your looking for. They guarantee their batteries for 1 year. If you ruin your battery they'll replace it. I havent had to buy a battery in 5 years because they keep going bad before I get to a year. And when they replace it the warrenty starts over.
     
  11. boatstall

    boatstall New Member

    Messages:
    140
    State:
    North Louisiana
    I also have a 16ft. square stern alum. that is rated for 5hp. The best advise I could give you regarding putting a TM on a canoe is to buy and use the biggest battery you can afford. The reason is simple.

    You are going to want to see what is around that next bend or cove, etc. etc.
    Amazing how far and how fast you can cover water with a TM on a canoe.
    Its not the getting there that becomes the issue, its the ability to return.

    boatstall
     
  12. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
    FYI, according to Consumer Reports, believe it or not, Wal-Mart batteries get the best reviews. That's where my next TM battery is coming from. That said, y'all are some MIGHTY BIG men to be fishin' around in a canoe! I'd opt for a flat bottomed jon.

    BB in SC
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2009
  13. Salthart

    Salthart New Member

    Messages:
    1,264
    State:
    North Carolina
    Your question is loaded I'm afraid. That is to say that there are so many ways to look at it. Yes, You can buy a lawn and garden battery and troll with it and Yes, Just like others have posted, You will ruin it. The question is HOW SOON.. How large is your motor ? How long will you run it ?

    a good quality charger would help on the life and the way you use your battery and how often will be a huge factor.

    Have you given thought to finding a small 2 or 3 hp outboard ? Or even building one from a string trimmer ? You can see where people have done this on Youtube. The use of a combustion engine to get from place to place would free your battery for fishing and cut way down on your battery use.
    So all said and done, And not to gainsay any of the others, If I were in your shoes I would catch the lawn and garden batteries on sale for $19.95. Make a way to lock it in place in the boat because even a small battery can tip you in a canoe.(when it does, if not tied your battery is going directly to the bottom btw) And try it out to see how it works for you. If you don't kill it every use you might get a season out of it. But you could at least make one trip and learn how long it will last and get an idea if it will do the job for you.


    Good luck and let us know how things work out.