transplanting nightcrawlers

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by cattinhoosier, Jul 23, 2008.

  1. cattinhoosier

    cattinhoosier New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    indiana
    Has anyone released nightcrawlers to start a population in a yard that has none. Does it work how many would it take to get them started good. My uncle has some but I don't so being a tight wad like I am I thought it would be a good idea for free bait in my own yard. Any suggestions or experience? thanks
     
  2. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    That is a very interesting question. I am sure that the worms are present based on soil composition and type. It may work. When I lived in GA I turned many loose..............................still no nightcrawlers, but nobody else had them either
     

  3. nycathunter

    nycathunter New Member

    Messages:
    101
    State:
    New York?
    i dont think it would work to well in a yard unless you realeased alot only because of birds especially robins if no one else has worms in there yard an the birds find them in yours youll have a yard full of robins tho lol i would either raise them in a bait box or a raised garden bed
     
  4. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    that bird issue makes alot of sense to me. Thanks for your post
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Seems to me that you'd have to have, or create, the right conditions for the worms. From what I've read, they don't like sandy soil, because the sand cuts into their bodies. So, I guess that if you have sandy soil, you're out of luck. Otherwise, they need moisture and food; some kind of cover is very attractive, too. I've created wormy spots by simply piling up leaves about 6" deep in a certain part of my back yard. When the leaves got accidentally raked up (by someone else), the worms disappeared. But even when the leaves were there, if the ground dried out, the worms left till it became moist again. I've also attracted worms by laying old scraps of plywood or carpet out on the ground. Don't want to dig in your yard, or have piles of leaves, plywood, or old carped laying around in it? Cultivate your grassy yard like the putting area of a golf course. I can't tell you how many times I've heard, "Man, the best place to get nightcrawlers is out on the putting green. Just use a red light and walk real easy so you don't scare them."
     
  6. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
    Did that once at a rental I had for a few years.

    No clue why, but this big yard had no crawlers. Over the course of 5 years I turned loose all the leftovers from fishing trips(3 or 5 or 7) and toward the end of my time there I had got to the point I thought I could take a few without harming the population.

    I was just playing around but if you want to be serious about it, I would get a soil test and adjust for the worms. Then pick up 500 or so from a wholesaler and dig them in.
    Under controlled conditions red worms will double in 60 to 90 days, I don't know about crawlers but I would guess, if things go right, you could start raiding them for personal in a year or two.

    If you have a County Extension Agent, you might want to ask him/her about local conditions before you get started.

    Good Luck!!
     
  7. mobowhtr

    mobowhtr Member

    Messages:
    102
    State:
    MO
    Several yrs ago I considered raising worms commercialy, in my research one of the interesting things I found was that our native night crawlers didn't work in tubs because they only breed and lay eggs in specific chambers of thier tunnel system, and diging some out for use or sale messed up the system. I never thought of useing a whole yard for a worm bed. I suspect that if you were to dig a fair size hole a foot or two deep and fill it with leaves, grass clipings, wood chips, etc. (worms will eat almost anything that has lived and died) keep it moist and give a little time to rot down, you could probably stock the area around it and develope a population, at the very least you would have a bunch or what ever type worm is native in your yard.
     
  8. katfish ken

    katfish ken New Member

    Messages:
    4,092
    State:
    Paintsvill
    YES!
    nightcrawlers require a far amount of organic mater in the soil. That being said. I had a piece of ground that was about100' bye 150'. I worked a lot of organic matter into the soil ( by a lot I mean winter wheat waist tall) 1st thing.Did that with a tractor and plow and dick. Then I put lime on the soil. Then took a shovel and dug holes every 8 to 10' apart 10 to12" deep. Then I went and caught a 1 1/2 gallon of worms brought them home and buried them in the holes. DO NOT pack soil tight buring them. In 3 Years I could catch all the worms I needed. This was a plot where I raise a garden in so the only extra work it was for me was diging the holes and buring the worms. that little effort saved me a bunch of money over the last20 odd years. Hope this helps.
     
  9. crazyKat

    crazyKat New Member

    Messages:
    549
    State:
    kentucky
    yrs ago at a friends grandma house they use to have night crawlers. dnt know if they raised them but i remember having to catch them at night with a flashlight cause she wouldnt let us dig in the yard we would catch them after a rain and i remember them being really fast and would be everywhere then just dissapear.
     
  10. BigCountryRob

    BigCountryRob New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    champaign i illinios
    maybe you could try feeding them with that worm food from walmart.just pick an area and feed and water it maybe turn a couple dozen loose right in that area and see how it goes.
     
  11. parman278

    parman278 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Kansas
    Soil must be a key but my uncle in Oklahoma dumped dishwater and coffee grounds in his yard and raised lots of worms. Not nightcrawlers, these were red and really squirmey. One day a guy came by and offered to buy $200 worth of worms. After taking out that many the worm farm was depleted.

    I think the moisture and the organic matter are the keys to having worms.