transom repair???

Discussion in 'Boating' started by FirefighterBull, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. FirefighterBull

    FirefighterBull New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Charlotte Tennessee
    ihave an old walk through tri hull the transom is a little soft right at the bolt holes anyone ever just stuck a piece of plate across em and bolted the motor back down? i want to get some feedback onpersonal experience doing so and if it will hold for a while thanks yall.
     
  2. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    I used a plate on a deep V bass tracker with an 80 HP Merc and it worked. I never did trust it so I replaced the whole thing.
     

  3. big riggin' younggun

    big riggin' younggun New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Illinois
    i work at a family owned fab. shop and that would work but remember it depends on how thick your plate is that you are putting in and you may also need to put a piece on the back of the boat and drill through both pieces and transom and bolt them together, that would be a sturdy fix.
     
  4. FirefighterBull

    FirefighterBull New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Charlotte Tennessee
    yeah thats what i was going to do is run it on both sides i dont wantto go fast just want to be able to get to my good holes and anchor off
     
  5. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I have talked with several guys who does this type of repair work, and they suggested at a minimum you use plate aluminum on the inside and outside, and have it held together by a aluminum angle iron on the top. It will require the aluminum to be welded, which will cost some, but no where near what the price of the aluminum would be. Probably could use regular metal plate, but you need to be conscious about weight.
     
  6. Trevor1

    Trevor1 New Member

    Messages:
    546
    State:
    oklahoma
    You can use a piece of angle iron on the inside and along the splash well. Just make sure it's as long as possible so it will disperse the load over the entire width of the transom, this should work for several years.
     
  7. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    If you have rotting around the bolt holes the odds are real high that isn't the only rot.
    One of the first places to rot is the bottom of the transom usually. Thats common in older boats particularly because at some point they have been been neglected by leaving them out in the weather uncovered for extended periods.

    One reason I'm not gungho about people jumping all over these "free" ancient boats unless they can afford and more importantly handle these repairs themselves.

    One way to check with exploratory surgery is a drill bit. Drill into the transom from the inside of the boat in multiple places checking the drill bit runnings.
    Fill the holes with thickened boat building epoxy.

    Another method is with a hammer. If it's bad you usually can tap around with a hammer.

    A transom is one of those things that you think "oh, that aint too bad" until you start tearing into it good. Then you are standing there looking at the mess repeating "damn" over and over.

    Really depends on how well the transom was constructed, how well the thru holes were put in it, and things like the top cap.
     
  8. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    As a footnote.
    If you are considering anything over 10 years old go ahead and budget for atleast 500 bucks for a transom repair doing it yourself.

    Atleast then when you pull it home and figure out what you bought into, your world isn't crumbling because you already budgeted for it.
     
  9. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    I'm with ya mark, that back part of the boat keeps water out! :embarassed:

    Seriously though, why spend money on a fix that's just temporary?
     
  10. ncfowler

    ncfowler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,648
    State:
    NC
    Name:
    Jeff
    don't forget to seal your bolts with a silcone sealer. the reason the it got soft in the first place is most likely water got behind the bolts, one show on tv showed this type of fix and they put a sealer in the holes and then using a under water line silcone sealer on the bolts and around washer on the exposed side (enough to squeeze out around washer) in the assembly of the repair
     
  11. FirefighterBull

    FirefighterBull New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Charlotte Tennessee
    preciate the help yall mark hit the nail on the head it was a free boat so i dont have any money invested in it preety much just brought it home for the motor but i tapped around on the transom a while back and it sounded preety solid but the front deck is spongey and some of the floor it willget scrapped and the trailer wil be made into a toy hauler lol i will get some use out of it
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    It's what I would do. Take any usuable hardware off it and scrap it.

    If a boat has rot problems like a spongey floor it usually doesn't end there. It goes into the stringers which are a itchy pain in the butt to cut out and replace and then you haven't even addressed the fiberglass. 9 times out of 10 If you got floor problems you got transom problems as well.
    When you have these problems obviously the boat has been cared for poorly.

    Glass is not impervious to water damage. Glass hulls do become waterlogged.
    Fiberglass is made up of millions of individual strands. When water finds a way into the glass mat or cloth it will literally run from strand to strand.
    It's called wicking.
    Just like if your kitchen floods from a broken pipe the water will wick up the sheetrock walls.

    One tell tell sign of this in fiberglass boats is a black oily residue usually in the bilge area but it doesn't always show that easily.

    These boats can be saved but few boats are worth saving unless it has some value as a collector.
    It involves putting these boats indoors, stripping the hull and placing fans in the hull to dry it out. We're talking months of these fans going. Not just a couple of days.
    It's a long drawn out process with no guarantees of success.

    That is why it is important that when you damage a fiberglass hull from beaching or trailer damage you need to really get down and look at it.
    If the damge goes to the glass you need to be mixing up a little epoxy and saturating the area with several coats before mixing in thickeners with epoxy to fair the damage back out. Forget the little gel coat repair kits. They are useless against water intrusion. They are just for cosmetic appeal.

    Above all keep the boats covered with a quality cover or better yet under a roofed structure like a shelter or garage. It greatly lengthens the service life of a boat.