Transom cracks

Discussion in 'Boat Repair Help' started by Rastus, Jun 24, 2007.

  1. Rastus

    Rastus Active Member

    Messages:
    158
    State:
    North Central, Missouri
    I have a late 70's, lowe, 17" bass boat with a rotten transom and cracks on both sides of where the 45hp outboard was. There is bracing running lengthwise with the boat that attaches to bracing running the width of the boat, about a foot in front of the transom. All bracing welds are cracked and was wondering if this is a problem for a professionial to tackle. The folks I bought the boat off of said it would cost $500 for someone to fix.
    After getting the boat home, I took it off the trailer and walked down the toungue and the trailer bent in half. Upon moving the boat I managed to pull the front hook(what looks to be a truck bed tie-down hook) out of the front of the boat.
    The trailer has been totally rebuilt and am now starting on the boat itself.I wouldn't mind just fixing the front hook problem and using the boat for a while with just a trolling motor being as I have two deep cycle marine batteries sitting around here anyways. Then fixing the transom once I have the money or a bunch of time to spare. My welding experience is limited to steel and I don't have the time neccessary to learn to weld alum.
    All thoughts welcome.
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Your talking two different animals when you speak of aluminum and fiberglass. It should not be difficult to replace a transom in an aluminum boat, but fiberglass takes a special skill and a lot of luck for a novice. The wooden portion of the transom should be sandwiched pieces of plywood, hopefully marine plywood, but regular exterior would work if your willing to replace the transom every three or four years. You will need to have all the cracks in the transom and its support braces welded before you replace the wood. No sense in doing a job half way, even if it means you must wait to save your pennies. There are several guys on the site who is very knowledgeable in this area, and I would recommend you wait for them to post before you take action. It should just be a few hours/days before you have more information than you wanted. LOL
     

  3. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Pictures would help tremedously.:confused2:
     
  4. Rastus

    Rastus Active Member

    Messages:
    158
    State:
    North Central, Missouri
    Thanks for the replys, Boat is an hour away as is scanner and camara, I'll see what I can do next weekend. Looking forward to getting this thing out on the water. Bought it 3-4 yrs ago, saved $$ a yr. built trailer and awesome engine stand one yr., got married and conviced wife to keep boat last year. As with anything, timing is everything. Patience is appreciated.
    Thanks.:big_smile:
     
  5. Rastus

    Rastus Active Member

    Messages:
    158
    State:
    North Central, Missouri
    Awshucks, sorry if I miss lead you within the first post as their is no fiberglass on the boat, only alum. and a really soft spungy rotten stuff that is now a breeding ground for all kinds of fungus. lol
    Thanks.
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Wait a minute!
    You married a woman that you had to convince to let you keep a boat you owned before you married her?

    She wouldn't last long around here. A few things out rank a wife , me being one of them.
     
  7. fish

    fish Active Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    ChattanoogaTenn
    Brent, I replaced the transome in the boat I use to have and it wasn't too bad a job. I had a few cracks like you are talking about in mine. My boat had pop rivets and was easy to take apart and reassemble. I used solid 8/4 cherry in my transome because that is what I had at the time and it is still holding up good. When you put the wood back in the transome, be sure to seal it before you put it in place. Seal all surfaces and every edge and ends really good and it will last you a long time. It really isn't too much to it but it is some work.
     
  8. nightowl

    nightowl New Member

    Messages:
    84
    State:
    Vicksburg,Mississippi
    AS FAR AS GETING THE TRANSOM WELED, THIS IS WITH OUT A DOUT A PRO'S JOB. BUT AS FAR AS THE PRICE I DONT THINK IT WILL COST YOU THAT MUCH, I WAS THINKING ARROUND $200 OR SO FROM WHAT I AM READING. GOOD LUCK.
     
  9. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I replaced the wood across the transom of my aluminum jonboat with a scrap piece of oak. That's what I had on hand. It's holding up very well.
     
  10. Rastus

    Rastus Active Member

    Messages:
    158
    State:
    North Central, Missouri
    Mark J, as I'm guessing you already know this but, there are three sides to every story. Hers, Mine, and what REALLY happened. Sorry, but the thread is about the boat, not the wife. Thanks for the attention to detail though.
    End of story period. lol