Transducer installation

Discussion in 'Kayaker and Canoe Fishing' started by Wallbass, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. Wallbass

    Wallbass New Member

    Messages:
    334
    State:
    Indiana
    Last year I bought a Mad River 14.5 FT Canoe and it has a single hull thickness of like ABS plastic. I would like to install the Fishfinder Trans. on the inside of the hull floor. The Q; is what kind of glue to use that will not hurt the hull?? Has anyone tried to put the Trans. into a bag of water and lay it on the floor??....Need help please.......Thanks Jeff :confused2:
     
  2. rush_60

    rush_60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,719
    State:
    Troy, KS
    What I did with mine was take a 3" piece of PVC. Cut it to about 4". Glue it to the hull with a layer of silicone around the outside. And then put vasaline in it and set the transducer in the vasaline. I suppose I could put water in there but the vasaline is pretty firm and holds the transducer the way I want it. And I almost forgot right before I attached the PVC to the hull, I roughed up the hull a bit with sandpaper (just enough to take the shine off), and cleaned it real well. I just did mine in march and so far its worked pretty good. Good luck!
     

  3. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    i always use marine "Goop". Thats a silicone type sealer that you can get at almost any boat/fishing supply house. check out jaxkayakfishing.com and search "kayak rigging" then "fish finders". You will find details on installing anything you want to put on a kayak...
     
  4. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
    Unspecified
    Jeff, in-hull mounting robs a little amount of transducer power, but not enough to worry about. Additional distance from the hull to the transducer is a concern, though. As sound passes through different materials, it refracts, or bends, at the interfaces between the materials. The greater the distances between the interfaces, the greater the bend. This creates inaccuracies in your readings, or reduced resolution of your fishfinder.

    Your goal is to get the transducer as close to the hull as possible without any air gaps. Air is a killer to sonar power.

    Even when using marine goop, you want to carefully apply as to eliminate air bubbles as much as possible.

    I would assume that Vaseline would work as well for temporary mounting, but the same principle applies: mount the transducer close to the hull without air bubbles or gaps.

    I prefer the semi-permanent mounting method of marine goop because it holds the transducer firmly in place, close to the hull; but you can still remove the transducer whenever necessary. I do not suggest that you epoxy the transducer to the hull unless you have several transducers lying around unused.

    Good luck! :cross:
     
  5. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    Good advice.... I used marine goop on both of my yaks and it works great.
     
  6. Wallbass

    Wallbass New Member

    Messages:
    334
    State:
    Indiana
    Well I went to Wally World and read the Goop package and it said not to use it on PVC or any plastic.... :confused2:
     
  7. kayaker

    kayaker New Member

    Messages:
    5
    I know this post is out dated but
    Just saw this today and I'm going to try the bag of water.


     
  8. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Just get a suction cup transducer and stick it to the bottom of the yak when you hit the water. Its what I got, no goo no glue:wink: Have a look at the Piranha 215.
     
  9. Yakdawg

    Yakdawg New Member

    Messages:
    146
    State:
    Cumming, GA
    Installing a FF on a Yak is pretty easy. You have several options when mounting the transducer. Most use a marine Goop and mount the transducer to the hull. They key is not to get any air bubbles between the T-ducer and hull. Here is a great video by Stan of Captdick enterprises on mounting the T-ducer:

    http://www.georgiakayakfishing.com/CDE_Transducer_Install

    He shows several options, I use the pool noodle/goop method. For power I use a 7amp alarm system battery from radio shack....runs my eagle fishmark 320 for days. Hope this helps!!!
     
  10. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    You're right, that's what it says.

    Since it's so widely used on polyethylene yaks, I decided to do a little testing. I took the top out of a HDPE barrel, roughed it up a bit, and then wiped it down with alcohol. I laid down some test patches of Goop, silicone, and Lexcel...3 of each. I then stuck the head of a 1/4" bolt in each one, and set it aside for a week.

    I was able to remove every one of the test bolts with a straightline pull, but the Goop did seem to have a stronger bond (to use the term generously) than the rest. As an afterthought, I tried a patch of hot glue, but no bolt...it seemed to stick pretty good, too, but I was able to pop it loose with the tip of a knife blade. Hot glue has the advantage of curing almost instantly, however.

    When I looked into adhesives for PE, I found that there are no commonly available adhesives/sealers that make a permanent bond. There are a couple of two-part products that allegedly do, however, but they both require specialized applicators, and seem to be beyond the reach of the casual garage tinkerer.

    All of this leads me to my question: Goop seems adequate for 'ducer installation, but what happens when you flip the yak upside down on a rack, and travel over rough roads? Anybody have any experience with this?
     
  11. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    after I posted the above, I decided to try the hotglue with a bolt, like I did with the other tests. As I said, no cure time with the hotglue...in a straight pull, I was unable to pull the glue free of the HDPE...the bolt came loose from the glue first. As before, however, it was very easy to remove with the tip of a knifeblade.

    If I can lay down enough of it before it begins to set, the hotglue may be the best choice for the 'ducer.
     
  12. Lucian

    Lucian New Member

    Messages:
    9
    State:
    Michigan
    Humminbird makes a plastic Thru Hull transducer for some of their Fishfinders that can be installed through the scupper holes on some kayaks. This makes installation easy but then you need to be aware that the transducer can get damaged in shallow water because it protrudes (approx. the thickness of the transducer, 1" or so) from the bottom of the hull. This is minimized in many of the Ocean Kayaks due to the fact that the hull design is such to allow the transducer to be recessed and the transducer is basically/ almost flush with the hull. The foot area scupper holes are designed to accept the thru hull transducers.

    If you buy a humminbird FF they offer a transducer exchange where you pay the difference between the transducer that came with the unit(usually a transom mount) and another of your choice.
     
  13. Yakdawg

    Yakdawg New Member

    Messages:
    146
    State:
    Cumming, GA
    Never heard of anyone using hot glue, but it is worth a try!

    The main thing to remember is not to get any air bubbles in it, will mess up your reading.

    As for goop, yes the product does say not to use on plastic. I have used it to install transducers on three kayaks without any problems. Many others use it also. I have had it on my ride for close to one year, and at least 50 fishing trips, some of which are down rivers where banging into a few rocks is not uncommon. The transducer has not moved a bit, still gives a very accurate reading!

    It is a bit of a chore to remove the transducer with the goop method, but its doable, I did it on the first kayak I sold with out much problem.

    Good luck with the fish finder!