Trailer guide-ons

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Localhero813, Jun 5, 2007.

  1. Localhero813

    Localhero813 New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Missouri
    does anyone have plans for homemade trailer guide-ons. i have a 14 ft jon boat trailer:cool2:
     
  2. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    No plans but you could take a piece of 2" unistrut bolt it under the trailer frame spanning across its width and then some.
    Take 2 of the heavy unistrut angles and bolt a piece of strut in the upright position on each side and drop a piece of PVC over each upright.
    I wouldnt use less then a 1/2" bolts, fender washers and either a locking nut or lockwashers.
    You'll probally need 20 feet of strut. Its comes in 10 and 20 foot lengths.
    Probally around 30-40 dollars depending on where you buy.
    Its probally cheaper at a store like Fastenal rather then Lowe's or Home Depot.
    Those box stores usually take you to the cleaners on fasteners and anything related to strut.
    You can get all kinds of strut from fiberglass to stainless. Stainless runs around 20 bucks a foot .
     

  3. Localhero813

    Localhero813 New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Missouri
    what i cant figure out is if ineed to use pvc or another type of upright
     
  4. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    PVC alone isnt much of an upright but PVC over something sturdier keeps the dings out of the hull and takes out the flop factor. PVC will bend and break.
    Trailers take a beating just being pulled down the highway.

    Now they make transom savers that attach to the hull rather then the trailer.
    The theory is that by attaching it to the trailer you are transmitting every bump in the road to your transom by a direct path.
     
  5. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Hero I made some using 3/4" EMT conduit. Just high enough for me to see ta back up the unit. I used a standard bender an tubing cutter and used C clamps to attach em to the frame. Siliconed some plastic caps on the uprights, popped riveted on some running lights. Just a sunday evening thing. I used 2 clamps to each rail of the trailer after slightly flatening the conduit at the attachment points. I don't use em as guide ons, but they been bumped some an have held up so far. I just used a level on the trailer horizontal, and a level on the uprights vertical as I mounted them. They are 4" clearance for my boat on each side, an just bout the width of my truck. Just for driving an backing up.
     
  6. George Graham

    George Graham New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    Texas
    These guides can serve at least two purposes:

    to help guide boat onto trailer and also if high enough, help you back trailer down ramp.

    PVC with reflective tape really helps at night

    You might want to consider two sets of guides, one at rear of trailer and one about 2/3rds of the length of your boat towards the front of your trailer.

    This second forward set will help in recovering your boat, especially if windy at boat ramp.

    My 16ft lowe deep vee and trailer came without guides, (29years ago) and the second trip to the lake was windy. I had to hand walk the boat onto the trailer. I did not launch again (two weeks) until I had installed two sets of guides, mine are connected by an 8 ft piece of treated 2x6. on each side of trailer, creates a fence.

    These guides have survived wind, heavy waves, young son learning to drive boat, brother in laws in a hurry and ME.

    George
     
  7. George Graham

    George Graham New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    Texas
    forgot to mention, my guides are of galv unistrut and treated lumber.

    George