Trail camera test post.

Discussion in 'Hunting Gear Talk' started by cheapNdisgusting, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    I want to start a thread on "how to use trail cameras"

    I have a Moultrie I-40. Color in the daytime and infrared at night. When I first put it out, I got a lot of pictures with no critters in it. 9 out of 10 were just great pictures of the background.

    My set-up was on a good deer crossing and the camera was pointed across the trail. (Picture #1)This is where I went wrong. The camera has a delayed trigger speed and I was getting pictures of where the deer HAD BEEN. I solved this problem by angleing the camera on more of a 45 deg. angle across the trail instead of the original 90 deg. (picture #2). I got much better results this way. Then I started using cracked corn as bait and when the deer found it, they posed for a jillion pictures. (Picture #3)

    I am by no sense of the imagination any kind of expert with a trail camera nor am I saying that mine is the best. I want to learn what works and what doesn't and then maybe we can all learn to use them better.
     
  2. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    Picture #1 90 deg. across the trail.
    Picture #2 45 deg. across the trail
    Picture #3 Bait
     

  3. Grimpuppy

    Grimpuppy New Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    State:
    Concordia, KS
    I use salt blocks during antler growth period to stop them and get good pictures. I like it better than bait because you never have to put more out. A block will last a couple years. Once hunting season gets close I mount my cameras on trees that are right next to trails. I aim them so they point down the trail so I get a front shot of the deer and they are in the cameras view for a long period of time.

    Picture #1 is early during antler growth on salt block

    Picture #2 is 3 weeks before bow season moved to aim down trails.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    I noticed that your "night" picture is in color, so I assume your camera has a flash instead of infrared.

    Pointing down the trail is the way to go.
     
  5. Grimpuppy

    Grimpuppy New Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    State:
    Concordia, KS
    Ya, it is white flash, no IR
     
  6. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
  7. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    Also if you have any advice - please feel free to add it. These things are not rocket science. But they are fun.
     
  8. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Have used them on my place. A neighbor set his up on an exit trail from deep timber to an open 1 acre food plot of corn and sorghum. Shelled corn and salt was also used to bait. The real reason we set it up was to check for poachers and trespassers which we have plenty of.

    Amazing the number of deer pictures taken. Equally interesting, the wild turkey and small wildlife, esp the squirrel sticking its head in the camera frame.
     
  9. Blue Duck

    Blue Duck New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    Idaho
    I have a Cam Tracker that I have used for about 20 years. I wish it were digital, but back then 35mm was the only thing going. Its great quality and has always been flawless except when a bear muched it. I sent in to the company and they fixed it up like new. I put a cable lock on it to lock to trees and it works fine, but Im sure if someone wanted to steal it they could cut the cable easy enough. I use it mostly on private land so theft isn't usually a problem. One thing I did that makes it handy is I mounted it on a camera tripod. Now I don't have to look for a tree to be in the exact right spot. I painted it camo and it works great.
     
  10. thunt713

    thunt713 New Member

    Messages:
    328
    State:
    winfield m
    what kind of camerias are you using i have 6 moultries and a couple of them wal mart specials the moultries take good pictures the 2 walmart specials are not even worth having in the woods :wink:
     
  11. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    Mine are Moultrie I-40's. I don't know much about others. These do everything I need. Altho, I did paint them camo. The black stood out too much.
     
  12. thunt713

    thunt713 New Member

    Messages:
    328
    State:
    winfield m
    Thats the same ones Ihave they seem to work pretty good.
     
  13. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    Moultrie makes good cameras. As icing on the cake, they have excellent friendly customer service if you ever need them.
     
  14. 6pointer0075

    6pointer0075 New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    tn
    it kind of looks like you are baiting a little far out for the camera to trip 100%. we set our cameras up on our tripod feeders. i have bought a couple cheap cameras before and all i got was blank background pictures but we actually have a moultrie and it takes amazing pictures . i recommend getting a solar panel for the camera. we never replace the batteries.
     
  15. azcataholic

    azcataholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    State:
    arizona
    Hello Guys, I just got a moultrie i-50. I have just put it out a couple of nights. I live in elk country and will upload some pics on here when i get some good ones. I will follow this thread trying to learn any tricks available.Thanks
     
  16. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
  17. seokfisherman

    seokfisherman Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Oklahoma
    About four years ago I purchased a low mega pixel Moultrie camera (I forgot the model number) for $100.00. It was bulky, consumed batteries, and came with tiny strings to mount the camera to a tree. The camera had a slow trigger speed and missed animals when placed on a trail. The camera worked ok on bait the first couple of years I owned it. It also had an SD card slot and stamped the time and date. I later purchased a Wildview camera for $50.00. I believe the camera was only .3 megapixel. The camera was small, easy to operate, and had decent battery life. It also had a decent trigger speed compared to the Moultrie. The Wildview had an SD card slot also but did not stamp the time and date. The Wildview was placed near bait and seemed to miss animals standing behind the bait just out of flash range. During the day it would capture animals a decent distance away. The Moultrie and the Wildview both had strobe flash for night illumination. The Moultrie seemed to have a better range at night. Picture quality was not important, I was mainly concerned with finding out what kind of bucks I had in the area. The Wildview captured several nice bucks so I put the Moultrie next to the Wildview so I could get some times and dates on the animals coming in to my stand area. The Wildview would average about 300 pictures every couple of days. The Moultrie failed to take any pictures. After checking the battery, I jumped up and down and walked all around in front of the camera and barely got it to take a few pictures. I left the camera out and checked it a few days later. It had rained and the seal failed which allowed moisture to get inside the camera display causing it to stop working. After deer season I removed the Wildview and discovered that it had also stoppped working. A solar charger would have helped with the Moultrie, but I bought two rechargeable batteries and would switch them every couple of days. This worked well since I was in the woods hunting frequently. These cameras are very inexpensive as far as digital cameras go and worked ok for the price. I recently bought a Stealth Cam with a strobe flash and will be trying it soon.
     
  18. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,893
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    Infrared flash and 4 megapixels. Batteries (6 size D) last at least 3 months, taking 150 to 200 pics a day. A 2 gig SD card will last about 1500 pics. before full, depending on resolution, Middle setting, Download to Picasa 3 and it cleans the card so you start over.
     
  19. drpepper

    drpepper New Member

    Messages:
    6,133
    State:
    Indiana
    Hey jay.. those pics are cool. pic #1 looks like the demon buck...
     
  20. seokfisherman

    seokfisherman Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Chasingame.com conducts game camera reviews and seems to be pretty un biased.