tracking deer

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by flannelman, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

    Messages:
    111
    does anybody have any tips on tracking and finding and stalking deer?
     
  2. flatheaddundee

    flatheaddundee New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    Madison,MS
    Well you might as well ditch the rubber boots for a lighter and more mobile pair that allow you to "feel" the ground. And look for areas that offer cover but are open enough to allow you to see the deer before they bust you. All of your senses have to be on red alert when stalking deer.
     

  3. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Stalking is my favorite way to deer hunt. My suggestions would be to slow down, if you think your going slow enough go even slower. Watch every step you make so you dont step on that stick. Try to stay in shadows and behind trees. Pick your stalks, meaning dont try it when all the leaves are crunchy and dry. Rain, snow and wind are great stalking weather. Often when Im on stand and get too cold I will stalk to my next stand.

    Also I wouldnt try this during turkey season but a good turkey mouth call is great to use when your taking a few steps to that next tree. Ive popped many a doe that would have normally run off but decided not to because of the turkey call. If your hunting with someone let them know what your doing. Often you can turn a stalk into a drive for your buddy.
     
  4. MadKater

    MadKater New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Evansville,IN
    great advise fellas.best advise i can give ya is go to wally world and get some of them cheap slip on "swimming" shoes,they wont keep your feet warm but they help out alot whne ya need to move qiutely. and for me its not out of the question to remove my boots completly to make a stalk..i would also suggest getting a pair of leg gators,to keep your pant legs close to your legs so they dont rub together and make noise.if you start putting a stalk on a deer dont be suprised if it takes ya an hour to cover 50yrds,and when in sight of the deer only move when its not looking towards you and also helps to move when you have background noise like wind.good luck to ya
     
  5. Jesse168

    Jesse168 Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    You can try all the tracking ya want but if ya don't keep the wind in your face you're fartrin in the wind. That deer will smell ya faster than it would a skunk.
     
  6. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I admire anyone who can stalk up a deer, I prefer to set and let someone chase then to me :D
     
  7. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    If it takes you more than an hour to cover a 1/4 mile, then you're doing it right. Use any available cover to hide your human form and don't get in a hurry. Use binoculars to scan the cover with EACH step you take. It is a very tedious process in which you will see more deer than you could ever see while sitting in a stand, when you pay attention to your surroundings and stalk a bedding area. Look for horizontal shapes/forms. Look for whites/browns. Anything that could indicate a deer. God bless.
     
  8. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    youre getting some great advice here and with luck youll see more deer this way than you will by sitting on a stand. and amen to the mention of if you think youre going slow enough... slow down some more. i wear rubber boots but deal with a lot of water and use a doe bleat call in lieu of a turkey call, sometimes ill use a grunt tube too.

    cammo i wear a ghille suit i made so im not so dependent upon trees for cover. stalking deer is one of the few times i use cover sents too instead of lure scents. dont forget to have some orange on you too. we joke about how common it is to not see any deer till we set our guns down to eat a sandwich or to pee. hahahaha somehow they know.

    stalking is also an excellent way to learn the land you hunt. i mean REALLY learn. its not the easiest method of hunting deer and for sure takes a little more dedication to master this technique but given time i think youll have a lot of fun doing it and in the process add one more method to your bag of tricks.
     
  9. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Wow, this is geat advise for a new hunter that wants to learn still hunting. I learned to hunt in the Colorado Mountains about 18 years ago. My friends taught me to still hunt and I was actually getting to where I could get pretty close to deer or elk my last year there. I actually followed an elk down a logging road the last year I hunted there. Only about 100 fee though, I took her when she finally turned so I could shoot something besides her backside. LOL It's very hard to hunt like that here in Tennessee unless like someone said it rains, snows and it's soft snow, or you find a place where the leaves aren't too thick. I've never thought about the turkey call before. What a great idea that is. Patience and stealth is what it takes in my opinion. And attention to detail when it comes to where you take every step and with all your clothing and equipment. I even used to take my rifle sling off so it couldn't squeak or brush up against anything. Quiet and slow movement is definately the order of the day if you're gonna hunt like this.
     
  10. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    a good bit on the stalking part, ill try to add a lil on the finding and tracking.

    lets say you just obtained access to a 1000 acre tract of woods you know has deer but youve never been on before. right after a good rain walk the perimeter of the property. youll learn your boundaries, how to get out if lost, and any active deer trails will be obvious. flatland bayou country makes terrain maps poiintless but anywhere else theyre a great idea. pay special attention to ridgelines and draws. (gully, holler, ravine, etc etc) and if natural water is scarce thats the place to focus your efforts first.

    those woods are the deer's home and just like you have your household routines so do they. deer are just like us in that they sleep, poop, eat and they have patterns they follow. they dont pee in the bed and they dont eat in the bathroom. follow an active trail and sooner or later you will find all of their hangouts. upon rising from a bedding area they head out to the outhouse enroute to breakfast and a drink of water. as deer browse for food where they eat is always changing and what they are eating is dictated by locale. if its a doe with a fawn or two with her then youll find the playpen too. (way cool to observe from a deer stand) just like a human mommy at the park with a small child or two the doe does the same. tiny clearings in heavy cover. doe sits alertly off to the side while the kiddies frolic and play.

    patrol the same woods enough and youll obtain a great idea of who the residents are. go out in spring and look for antler sheds to get an idea of the big guys in the area. or just use a deer-cam. hahaha
    you can find sheds later in the summer but its rare. they are an important source of calcium and minerals for squirrels and such so they get gnawed up before too long.

    figuring out the routine isnt that hard. whats so difficult is the when not the where. the more hunting pressure they face the more apt they are to go nocturnal. sometimes i swear i can hear the deer laughing as i get out of my stand at dark thirty. times like this is when the skill of stalking comes into its own as unless its the rut, stalking is about the only way you will see nocturnal deer during shooting hours.
     
  11. Big Country01

    Big Country01 New Member

    Messages:
    964
    State:
    brandon,florida
    some pretty good advice in this thread..... :D