Tough Okra...

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by LureheadEd, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. LureheadEd

    LureheadEd New Member

    Messages:
    197
    State:
    Geogia
    Finally got back to the hunt club garden this weekend and picked some okra, the other fellow had had his fill a month ago.... The stuff is too tough even boiled...Any ideas on what to do with the rest of it ? Oh, I also got about 3-4 lbs. of seed for next year from the dried pods, I've never saved seed from one years crop...How should I prepare the seed for next year ? A few dollars here and there might help in these times...Any advice sure is appreciated !
     
  2. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Ed,if that okra is tough,it wont be fit to eat ever!!,I would let it dry out and get the seeds from it,If it is a non hybred variety it will produce ,if hybred it wont. To keep seeds ,just dry them ,and keep dry in a fairly cool dry place. I have storebought seeds from 5 yrs ago that I have planted and they did just fine.
     

  3. LureheadEd

    LureheadEd New Member

    Messages:
    197
    State:
    Geogia
    Thanks Richard, that's what I thought...Hey, somebody told me to put the seeds in the freezer, ever heard of that ? Said it would kill whatever tiny bugs were on 'em.... I put the seeds in an old cricket cage and rolled and shook 'em clean, but there were a few bugs there. I'm pretty sure I got 'em all, still want to do this right...
     
  4. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    Moisture and high temperatures cause rapid loss in the ability of vegetable seeds to germinate. Therefore, discard vegetable seeds held in storage buildings, vehicles, and other places with widely fluctuating temperatures and humidities.
    The longer seeds are stored, the more important it is to control moisture and temperature conditions. Low moisture content in the seeds means longer life, especially if seeds must be kept at warm temperatures.
    Seeds can be stored over, but not touching, calcium chloride, dried silica gel, or freshly opened powdered milk by sealing them in air-tight containers.
    Bean and okra seeds can be overdried, resulting in hard seed coats and reduced germination. Seeds can be stored successfully at temperatures above 32 ºF. Between 40 and 50 ºF is satisfactory when moisture content of the seed is not too high.
    For long-term storage (several months) seeds can be stored in the freezer. Seeds are not harmed if properly dried before storing, but be sure to let them come to room temperature before handling.
    Do not store chemically treated seeds with vegetables or other food items that are to be eaten.
     
  5. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Tough okra? All I can think of is you are picking it too late.
    It's the little uns you want. I take my knife and test the bigger ones by putting the blade down at the base of the okra close to the stem. It should easily slice into with no effort. If not, they aint good for the pot.
     
  6. LureheadEd

    LureheadEd New Member

    Messages:
    197
    State:
    Geogia
    Thanks, Johnny...We'll put 'em in the freezer and see what happens...

    Mark, I have'nt been able to get to the club this summer to pick 'em... And we had a spell of no rain for 28 days before I did get there...When I was cutting 'em I noticed they were a bit hard...This is the 1st year for planting the okra at the club, every other time I planted it in my garden it all got watered and picked on time...

    Okra seeds are easy to get from the dried pods and the deer did'nt eat the pods , only the leaves... Anybody got any other "vegetables that the deer don't eat " suggestions ?
     
  7. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    They will flat out dessimate a crop of Dixie Lee peas overnight.
    I like the small Dixie Lee peas but I also like them big purple hull crowders.
    When I started planting those the deer started leaving my garden alone. They may walk through it and nip something here and there but they dont use it as a feed trough no more. Something about them peas they take a liking to from my experience.
     
  8. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    yep okra needs to be picked at 2" or so. after that it gets spiney. you can tell when its sliced. if it crackles as you slice it slice it to the garbage. if its like hot knife through butter its goooooooooooooodddddddddd!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  9. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Okra is some nasty slimey stuff. Feed it to the hogs. LOL