Too Cold to Jug

Discussion in 'LOCAL NORTH CAROLINA TALK' started by Tarpon, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. Tarpon

    Tarpon New Member

    Messages:
    19
    When I get home for christmas break I'd like to be able to do some catfishing. I'll be on either high rock or tuckertown, fishing beside the dam. Is it worth it to set out jugs? I usually use chicken liver and target eatin size channels. thanks
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    All the jugfishing I've done during cold weather has been at the warm water discharge at the nuclear plant. That's extremely effective. Unfortunately, I can't offer any info about jugging out in the cold water of the Arkansas River system.
     

  3. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Tarpon, Have you jugged that close to the dam in the past? seems to me your jugs will be floating to fast down stream. The current at our dams get very fast at times. Just my thought. :confused: :D
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Top, I often drop my jugs close to the dams on the Arkansas. For instance, I generally start dropping them at the bluffs across from the launching ramp at Toad Suck; but at Dardanelle, you can't drop them above the hwy 7 bridge. When they are releasing enough water to cover the dikes, I don't jug, but that's because of the jugs getting hung on the dikes, not because of the speed of the water. Jugging in a relatively fast current will definitely cause your jugs to spread out, though. You really have to watch for jugs getting left behind in slackwater or slow current areas, as well as for those getting hung up on the bottom, which is normal.
     
  5. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    I've done quite a bit of winter jugfishing both on rivers and lakes. The biggest thing I would say is to reduce the size of your baits. I never get any hits on whole or cut shad over 3 inches during the winter. Small cut shad one to two inches works the best when the surface water temps get below 45 degrees. Long line jugs can do well the the deeper sections of your lake or river but I still catch a majority of my shad in water less than 9 feet and thats when water temps have been below 40 degrees. Experminent with both regular shallow running jugs nine feet or less and make yourself some deep water jugs. Make your deep running jugs according to the deepest depths of your water. I've had days where I only catch a few and other days I limit out with half of my blues over twenty pounds. Winter fishing can be great but not all the time.

    Good Luck